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Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130013
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden Maria Furberg1,2*, Birgitta Evengård1,2 and Maria Nilsson2 1Division of Infectious diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Umeå Centre for Global Health
  1 document  
Author
Maria Furberg
Birgitta Evengård
Maria Nilsson
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
501926
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry - methods - trends
Animals
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Reindeer
Seasons
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Young Adult
Sami
Perception
Abstract
The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.
To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.
In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.
One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze-thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.
The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Jun;34(3):623-915737965
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
PubMed ID
22043218 View in PubMed
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Infant mortality of Sami and settlers in Northern Sweden: the era of colonization 1750-1900.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130015
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900. Keywords: infant mortality; indigenous; Sami; seasonality; parity, demography; vulnerability Received: 4 August 2011; Revised: 5 October 2011; Accepted: 5 October 2011; Published: 27 October 2011 T hat the health of indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Peter Sköld
Per Axelsson
Lena Karlsson
Len Smith
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
348758
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Health status
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality - history - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parity
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Sweden
Demography
Indigenous peoples
Seasonality
Sami
Vulnerability
Abstract
The study deals with infant mortality (IMR) that is one of the most important aspects of indigenous vulnerability.
The Sami are one of very few indigenous peoples with an experience of a positive mortality transition.
Using unique mortality data from the period 1750-1900 Sami and the colonizers in northern Sweden are compared in order to reveal an eventual infant mortality transition.
The results show ethnic differences with the Sami having higher IMR, although the differences decrease over time. There were also geographical and cultural differences within the Sami, with significantly lower IMR among the South Sami. Generally, parity has high explanatory value, where an increased risk is noted for children born as number five or higher among siblings.
There is a striking trend of decreasing IMR among the Sami after 1860, which, however, was not the result of professional health care. Other indigenous peoples of the Arctic still have higher mortality rates, and IMR below 100 was achieved only after 1950 in most countries. The decrease in Sami infant mortality was certainly an important factor in their unique health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900.
Notes
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(2):159-6011242823
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Milbank Mem Fund Q. 1971 Oct;49(4):509-385155251
Cites: J Biosoc Sci. 2001 Jan;33(1):67-8611316396
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-8519577696
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2019-2816782493
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):27-4218468257
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-7519577695
Cites: Soc Hist Med. 1988 Dec;1(3):329-5811621729
PubMed ID
22043216 View in PubMed
Documents

Skold-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Sweden's Arctic Strategy: an overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299981
Source
The Arctic Institute. Center for Circumpolar Security Studies.
Publication Type
Article
Date
April 16, 2019
Author
Khorrami, Nima
Source
The Arctic Institute. Center for Circumpolar Security Studies.
Date
April 16, 2019
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Geopolitics
Environmental strategy
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Security
Defense
Sami
Abstract
To Sweden, the Arctic is both a matter of domestic politics and foreign policy. Any attempt at understanding Stockholm’s approach towards its own Arctic region as well as the wider Arctic, therefore, must take into account not only its foreign policy priorities but also its domestic needs and sensitivity to various social, political, environmental, and economic developments that are taking place at an accelerating rate including, among other things, the possibility of an oil leak due to an accident on the sea or at an exploration site and its potential impact on the Arctic’s fragile environment, biodiversity, and its indegenous people. Nonetheless, Sweden’s concerns with regard to the future trajectory of the region on both fronts share a large number of important similarities including effective and inclusive governance, environmental protection, peace and security, and sustainable economic growth.
This article is the first in a series of five exploring and explaining Sweden’s Arctic policy. The objective is to provide a general overview of and/or guideline on the country’s Arctic strategy as stipulated within the larger framework of its foreign and domestic policy making. Future papers will then shed light on and delve deeper into some of the more specific issues touched upon in this article. These include a survey of Swedish businesses in the Arctic and how they are contributing to the economic development of the region; Stockholm’s approach towards a common Arctic policy at the European level; a critical analysis of Sweden’s military neutrality in the High North and whether or not it can keep this position in the long run; and Stockholm’s preferred role for the Nordic Cooperation and Nordic Defence Cooperation in the Scandinavian Arctic.
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Sami responses to poverty in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295960
Source
In Indigenous peoples & poverty : an international perspective by CROP International Studies in Poverty Research. chapter 15. pp 274-289.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
Sami identity in order to save themselves and their families from persecution. After the Second World War and the atrocities surrounding the Holocaust, however, world powers were concerned with human rights and colonial issues, allow- ing the Sami to benefit from a change in political sentiment
  1 document  
Author
Burmeister Hicks, Christian Jakob
Somby, Ande
Source
In Indigenous peoples & poverty : an international perspective by CROP International Studies in Poverty Research. chapter 15. pp 274-289.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
104698
Keywords
Sami
Poverty
Political history
Culture
Education
Reindeer
Documents

Indigenous-Peoples-and-Poverty---An-International-Perspective.pdf

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Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. Embassy in Stockholm, Sweden
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Witnesses to Change
Ice Cover
Climate change
Sweden
Arctic Regions
Forecasting
Abstract
The U.S. Embassy Stockholm, with Swedish superstar Felix Herngren and the World Wildlife Fund created four videos highlighting climate change and the Arctic. The videos are:
Our Shared Arctic - The Glacier
Our Shared Arctic - The People
Our Shared Arctic - The Science
Our Shared Arctic - The Future
Online Resources
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Indigenous life expectancy in Sweden 1850-1899: towards a long and healthy life?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297038
Source
Demographic Research. Vol.28, article 16. p. 433-456.
Publication Type
Article
Date
8 March2013
entails changing the culture and the individual (Berry 1990). How this process affects indigenous groups depends on the cultures involved and the quality of the relationship between the groups (Kvernmo 2006). The acculturation of indigenous groups can lead to positive effects; however, the negative
  1 document  
Author
Karlsson, Lena
Source
Demographic Research. Vol.28, article 16. p. 433-456.
Date
8 March2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
706968
Keywords
History, 1850-1899
Indigenous peoples
Life expectancy
Sami
Mortality
Colonization
Abstract
BACKGROUND Previous research has shown that the health transition and demographical pattern of indigenous people has followed a different path compared to non-indigenous groups living in the same area with higher mortality rates and shortened life expectancy at birth.
OBJECTIVE This paper draws attention to the development of life expectancy for the Sami and non-Sami during the colonization era (1850-1899). The paper will compare the development of life expectancy levels, infant mortality, and age-specific mortality between the Sami and the non-Sami population and analyze the main causes of death.
METHODS The source material for this study is a set of data files from the Demographic Data Base (DDB) at Umeå University. Life tables and calculations of values of life expectancies are calculated using period data.
RESULTS The analysis reveals that the life expectancy at birth was remarkably lower for the Sami during the entire period, corresponding to a high infant mortality. When comparing life expectancy at birth with life expectancy at age one, Sami still had a lower life expectancy during the entire period. The analysis also reveals a lower proportion of deaths due to infections among the younger Sami.
CONCLUSIONS The results paint a complex picture of the demographic transition in Sápmi. Neither the Sami nor the non-Sami population followed the same pattern of increased life expectancies at birth, as the Swedish population did in general. The negative consequences of colonization (high mortality, low life expectancy at birth) hit the Sami and non-Sami populations, but at different time periods.
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Sami lifestyle and health : epidemiological studies from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295942
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2012
  1 document  
Author
Nilsson, Lena Maria
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1806673
Keywords
Sami
Traditional diet
Traditional lifestyle
Cohort
Mortality
Cancer
Cardiovascular disease
Abstract
The aim of this PhD thesis was to expand the current knowledge of “traditional Sami” diet and lifestyle, and to test aspects of the Sami diet and lifestyle, specifically dietary pattern, macronutrient distribution and coffee consumption, in population-based epidemiological studies of mortality and incident cardiovascular disease and cancer in a general population...
Notes
ISBN 978-91-7459-359-4
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SLiCA Arctic living conditions - living conditions and quality of life among Inuit, Saami and indigenous peoples of Chukotka and the Kola Peninsula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296755
Source
TemaNord 2015:501. 426 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
............................................................................................................................93 2.6 SLiCA – A Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic; Inuit, Saami and the Indigenous Peoples of Chukotka ..........................................................94 2.7 Focus on context, social change and the concepts of well-being within SLiCA
  1 document  
Author
Poppel, Birger
Source
TemaNord 2015:501. 426 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
Sweden
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
6442257
Keywords
Nunavut
Alaska
Living conditions
Education
Inuit
Saami
Chukotka
Kola Peninsula
Suicide
Abstract
The SLiCA anthology probes into the theoretical and methodological background of the SLiCA project, the research design, the ethical principles applied and introduces examples of the wealth of information available on the livelihoods and living conditions of the Inuit, Saami and the indigenous peoples of Chukotka and the Kola Peninsula, measured with quality of life criteria they themselves chose. Furthermore the anthology provides samples of analyses - including comparative and contextual studies - that can be accomplished using SLiCA data. Examples of living conditions and topics analysed are: 'suicidal thoughts'; impacts of oil development on living conditions and quality of life; economic stratification; objective and subjective living conditions; education; gender based differences in productive activities; impacts of societal development on men's and women's perceptions of their contributions to their households; factors affecting migration, identity, ethnicity, and herding rights.
Notes
ISBN 978-92-893-3895-0 (print)
ISBN 978-92-893-3897-4 (pdf)
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Proposal for ethical guidelines for Sami health research and research on Sami human biological material.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296261
Source
The Samediggi - The Sami Parliament in Norway. 50 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2016]
personal health data being used for specific, broadly defined research purposes, cf. §14. REC may specify condi- tions for the use of broad consent and may order a project manager to obtain new consent if the committee deems it necessary. In the event of substantial changes, the research project 3 §9
  1 document  
Source
The Samediggi - The Sami Parliament in Norway. 50 p.
Date
[2016]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3643975
Keywords
Sami
Health Research
Ethical guidelines
Consent
Human biological material
Documents

Proposal-for-Ethical-Guidelines-for-Smi-Health-Research-and-Research-on-Smi-Human-Biological-Material.pdf

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Prevalence and sensitization of atopic allergy and coeliac disease in the Northern Sweden Population Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107663
Source
Pages 484-490 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):484-490
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
identified, but air pollution (6), climate change and socio-economic conditions, as well as the exposure to infectious agents in 484 Citatim: Int J Circumpolar Health 201 3, 72: 21403 - http://dx.doi.org/10.34021ijch.v72i0.21403 early childhood, have been suggested to influence the development (3,7
  1 document  
Author
Stefan Enroth
Ingrid Dahlbom
Tony Hansson
Ã?sa Johansson
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, SciLifeLab Uppsala, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Pages 484-490 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):484-490
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Atopic allergy is effected by a number of environmental exposures, such as dry air and time spent outdoors, but there are few estimates of the prevalence in populations from sub-arctic areas.
To determine the prevalence and severity of symptoms of food, inhalation and skin-related allergens and coeliac disease (CD) in the sub-arctic region of Sweden. To study the correlation between self-reported allergy and allergy test results. To estimate the heritability of these estimates.
The study was conducted in Karesuando and Soppero in Northern Sweden as part of the Northern Sweden Population Health Study (n=1,068). We used a questionnaire for self-reported allergy and CD status and measured inhalation-related allergens using Phadiatop, food-related allergens using the F Ã? 5 assay and IgA and IgG antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) to indicate prevalence of CD.
The prevalence of self-reported allergy was very high, with 42.3% reporting mild to severe allergy. Inhalation-related allergy was reported in 26.7%, food-related allergy in 24.9% and skin-related allergy in 2.4% of the participants. Of inhalation-related allergy, 11.0% reported reactions against fur and 14.6% against pollen/grass. Among food-related reactions, 14.9% reported milk (protein and lactose) as the cause. The IgE measurements showed that 18.4% had elevated values for inhalation allergens and 11.7% for food allergens. Self-reported allergies and symptoms were positively correlated (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986895 View in PubMed
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The impact of Chernobyl on the economy and cultural-environment of northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76740
Source
Pages 195-198 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
and plant species, poor soils and a short growing season. Unlike much of the rest of the circumpolar north, how- ever, the climate mitigating influences of the Gulf Stream enable agriculture. It also means that this agriculture is a precarious enterprise. The best agricultural soils are the
  1 document  
Author
Broadbent, N.D.
Author Affiliation
Center for Arctic Cultural Research, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
Source
Pages 195-198 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Berry picking
Cesium
Chernobyl
Farming
Fishing
Forestry
Moose hunting
Reindeer herding
Saami
Scandinavians
Sweden
Västerbotten
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The impact of climate change on Sami reindeer husbandry in Sweden. What are the possible ways forward?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297049
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow papers. 6 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
August 2015
The impact of climate change on Sami reindeer husbandry in Sweden. What are the possible ways forward? Léon Fuchs August 2015 I The significance of reindeer herding The Sami – also spelled Sámi or Saami, who were given the derogatory name of Lapp – have lived in
  1 document  
Author
Fuchs, Leon
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow papers. 6 p.
Date
August 2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
142830
Keywords
Sami
Reindeer husbandry
Climate change
Documents

ASC-Paper_Fuchs_Lon.pdf

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Climate change and tourism adaptation in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297050
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 6 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
! Arctic Summer College 2015 ! Climate Change and Tourism Adaptation in Northern Sweden ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Alix VARNAJOT University of Versailles, France University of Umeå, Sweden ! ! ! On the way to Arjeplog… Cdts: Alix Varnajot, 2015 Abstract As a climate
  1 document  
Author
Varnajot, Alix
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 6 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
485227
Keywords
Tourism
Climate change
Abstract
As a climate-dependent and nature based industry, tourism is closely linked to climate change. In Arctic and dub-Arctic regions like in northern Sweden, changing climate is synonym of both chalenges and opportunities for tourism professionals. This study in and around the Jokkmokk and Arjeplog settlements, where tourism professionals were interviewed, allow us to compare scholar projections and informants field experiences. This study also aim to determine how the tourism professionals community feel, face and adapt to climate change. In northern Sweden, climate change does not represent a fatality for tourism professionals. Challenges brought by changing climate seems surmontable, and new opportunities will appear during summers. However, climate change will bring close socio-cultural, economic and physical limits for societies in the two northernmost Swedish counties of Västerbotten and Norrbotten.
Documents

ASC-Paper_Varnajot_Alix.pdf

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Is heat a mortality risk in the Canadian Arctic? Will it be?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256406
Source
Pages 326-327 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
studies have modeled the effect of a warmer climate on the basis of documented population responses to summers warmer than the mean. Coupling these mortality responses with climate change model predictions will allow for estimation of heat-related mortality in northern settlements should warming
  1 document  
Author
Kosatsky, T.
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control
Source
Pages 326-327 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Russia
Finland
Sweden
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Heat waves
Stroke
Finland
Sweden
Russian Federation
Arctic
Death
Temperature
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
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A vulnerability assessment of Norbotten, Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297143
Source
AVEC : Integrated Assessment of Vulnerable Ecosystems under Global Change EU Concerted Action. International Summer School, Peyresq, Alpes de Haute-Provence, France, 14 – 27 September 2003. 11 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
sustainable development strategy; it will also provide the socio-economic tools and assessments as well as overall management practices. Furthermore, it will contribute to their implementation at the enlarged EU level and, when relevant, at the world level. Global changes include climate change, socio
  1 document  
Author
Chen, Youmin
Costache, Andra
Fronzek, Stefan
Hille, Marco
Kahmen, Ansgar
Koch, Katja
Baxter, Bob (tutor)
Source
AVEC : Integrated Assessment of Vulnerable Ecosystems under Global Change EU Concerted Action. International Summer School, Peyresq, Alpes de Haute-Provence, France, 14 – 27 September 2003. 11 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
454450
Keywords
Norrbotten
Climate change
Land use
Sami
Traditional life
Reindeer
Mining
Documents
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The Sami - an Indigenous People in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297146
Source
Sami Parliament and Regeringskansliet, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Consumer Affairs. 64 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005
districts called Lappmarks. 10000–5000 BC The inland ice receded in northern Scandinavia. 1800–900 BC The climate changed and wild reindeer began to graze on coastal grass pastures in summer and on lichen inland in win- ter. Wild reindeer were captured. 13th century The Sami are mentioned in Snorri
  1 document  
Source
Sami Parliament and Regeringskansliet, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Consumer Affairs. 64 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6286353
Abstract
The Sami – an Indigenous People in Sweden describes what it is like be a Sami today, what it was like in the past and what it may be like in future. The book gives a picture of the Sami as an indigenous people, their culture, history and society. It is based on reportage and factual material, as well as texts written by researchers, writers and other experts.
Notes
ISBN 91-974667-9-4
Documents
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The health condition in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2002: Causes of death and incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296241
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2005
, unfavourable changes in health. Although the role and status of the Sami population in Sweden has been described in a historical context, these aspects have not been thoroughly evaluated in relation to health. The overall objective of this thesis was to investigate the health conditions of the Sami
  1 document  
Author
Hassler, Sven
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
468671
Keywords
Sami
Health
Epidemiology
Reindeer herder
Cardiovascular diseases
Cancer
Causes of death
Acculturation
Sweden
Documents
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Diversifying identity, diversifying strategy: revisiting the Sami of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296251
Source
International Studies in Poverty Research. 20 p.
Date
2007
reindeer related policy which benefit Sami, but these policies do not contain enough flexibility for herders to pursue a diverse enough economic strategy to live on. Reindeer herding is not uncommonly a marginal livelihood, whether due to land use conflicts or climate change. But by law, samebys
  1 document  
Author
Wang, Elaine
Author Affiliation
University of Vermont
Source
International Studies in Poverty Research. 20 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
File Size
421281
Keywords
Sami
Economics
Politics
Documents
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Climate change and displacement for Indigenous Communities in Arctic Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297122
Source
Brookings LSE. Project on Internal Displacement. 35 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 30, 2013
Ilan Kelman Marius Warg Næss Center for International Climate and Environmental Research—Oslo Climate Change and Displacement for Indigenous Communities in Arctic Scandinavia January 30, 2013 Cover image: Winifried
  1 document  
Author
Kelman, Ilan
Næss, Marius Warg
Author Affiliation
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research—Oslo
Source
Brookings LSE. Project on Internal Displacement. 35 p.
Date
January 30, 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
646676
Keywords
Saami
Climate change
Migration
Reindeer
Displacement
Documents

30-arctic-scandinavia-kelman-paper.pdf

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Relocation of Kiruna and Building the Markbygden Wind Farm and the Sami Rights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297064
Source
Current Developments in Arctic Law. Volume 6. p.17-24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
change [in:] R. Abate, E. A. Kronk (ed.) Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples: The Search for Legal Remedies, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 296. See also: International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, The Indigenous World 2016, Copenhagen 2016, p. 33, https://www.iwgia.org/images/publications
  1 document  
Author
Szpak, Agnieszka
Source
Current Developments in Arctic Law. Volume 6. p.17-24.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
545422
Keywords
Markbygden
Sami
Reindeer
Wind power
Climate change
Documents
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20 records – page 1 of 1.