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Stresses of change and mental health among the Canadian Eskimos

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2558
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):565-570
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
Enflironmen.tal Stresses on Human Behavior 565 Stresses of Change and Mental Health Among the Canadian Eskimos Frank G. Vallee. PhD, Ottawa RECENT years have witnessed a height- ened interest in human behavioral prob- lems in the Canadian Arctic. Social scien- tists have been focusing on
  1 document  
Author
Vallee, F.G
Author Affiliation
Carleton University
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):565-570
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Canada
Cold Climate
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Hysteria - epidemiology
Inuits
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Mental health services
Stress, Psychological
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2323.
Documents

67-21-Stresses of Change and Mental Health Among the Canadian Eskimos.pdf

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Mortality of Labrador Innu and Inuit, 1971-1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2697
Source
Pages 139-142 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Cireunrpolar Health 84:139-142 MORTALITY OF LABRADOR INNU AND INUIT, 1971-1982 KATHRYN A. WOTTON INTRODUCTION Few peoples have experienced such drastic changes in their ways of living and dying as have tile Indians and Inuit in the Canadian North in the last generation. Many of the
  1 document  
Author
Wotton, K.A.
Source
Pages 139-142 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Accidents
Berry aneurysm
Eskimo lung
Nain
Suicide
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1431.
Documents
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Health promotion partnerships: service and education addressing the health needs of vulnerable groups

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2848
Source
Pages 91-95 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
, as well as those of vulnerable population groups, have been identified and documented in published sources. 1ยท2 However, because the current politi- cal and economic climate emphasizes budget reductions, the means to address those needs are shrinking. Creative approaches are needed to meet the
  1 document  
Author
Pflaum, J.
Sanders, N.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK
Source
Pages 91-95 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Health needs assessment
Health promotion
Nursing education
Abstract
This paper describes partnerships between service and education that can assist in meeting the health care needs of vulnerable population groups. Baccalaureate nursing students learn about population-based nursing practice as a means of addressing health needs. Each semester, groups of 8-10 senior students work with a community agency serving a population at risk. Students assess health needs and plan, implement, and evaluate a health promotion intervention with the population and the agency. Emphasis is placed on designing culturally appropriate interventions that are accomplished in partnership with the agency and population. Projects which illustrate the generalizability of this approach will be discussed. Such experiences reduce barriers that separate education from practice. Community agencies benefit as health needs that might not otherwise be met are addressed.
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Comparison of hydrochemistry and organic compound transport in two non-glaciated high Arctic catchments with a permafrost regime (Bellsund Fjord, Spitsbergen).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286043
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Sep 22;613-614:1037-1047
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-22-2017
Author
Sara Lehmann-Konera
Lukasz Franczak
Waldemar Kociuba
Danuta Szuminska
Stanislaw Chmiel
Zaneta Polkowska
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Sep 22;613-614:1037-1047
Date
Sep-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
An increase in air temperature related to climate change results in the retreat of glaciers, the degradation of permafrost, and the expansion of glacier-free areas in the polar regions. All these processes lead to changes in the Arctic landscape. They influence the hydrochemistry of streams and rivers fed by glaciers and thawing permafrost. In this study, we examine eighty two water samples from two non-glaciated catchments with snow-permafrost regime: the Tyvjobekken Creek and the Reindeer Creek (NW Wedel-Jarlsberg Land, Spitsbergen). We cover hydrometeorological measurements, fluctuations of physicochemical parameters (pH, specific electrolytic conductivity (SEC)), and the presence of selected organic compounds (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (HCHO), ?phenols). The obtained levels of DOC (0.061-0.569mgCL(-1)) and HCHO (0.40). The Tyvjobekken Creek catchment, in contrast to Reindeer Creek catchment, turned out to be resistant to rapid changes in meteorological conditions (r
PubMed ID
28950666 View in PubMed
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Qiviut cortisol in muskoxen as a potential tool for informing conservation strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286046
Source
Conserv Physiol. 2017;5(1):cox052
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Juliette Di Francesco
Nora Navarro-Gonzalez
Katherine Wynne-Edwards
Stephanie Peacock
Lisa-Marie Leclerc
Matilde Tomaselli
Tracy Davison
Anja Carlsson
Susan Kutz
Source
Conserv Physiol. 2017;5(1):cox052
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) are increasingly subject to multiple new stressors associated with unprecedented climate change and increased anthropogenic activities across much of their range. Hair may provide a measurement of stress hormones (glucocorticoids) over periods of weeks to months. We developed a reliable method to quantify cortisol in the qiviut (wooly undercoat) of muskoxen using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. We then applied this technique to determine the natural variability in qiviut cortisol levels among 150 wild muskoxen, and to assess differences between sexes, seasons and years of collection. Qiviut samples were collected from the rump of adult muskoxen by subsistence and sport hunters in seven different locations in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories between 2013 and 2016. Results showed a high inter-individual variability in qiviut cortisol concentrations, with levels ranging from 3.5 to 48.9 pg/mg (median 11.7 pg/mg). Qiviut cortisol levels were significantly higher in males than females, and varied seasonally (summer levels were significantly lower than in fall and winter), and by year (levels significantly increased from 2013 to 2015). These differences may reflect distinct environmental conditions and the diverse stressors experienced, as well as physiological and/or behavioural characteristics. Quantification of qiviut cortisol may serve as a valuable tool for monitoring health and informing conservation and management efforts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28948023 View in PubMed
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Regulation of gene expression is associated with tolerance of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis to CO2-acidified sea water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286051
Source
Ecol Evol. 2017 Sep;7(18):7145-7160
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Allison Bailey
Pierre De Wit
Peter Thor
Howard I Browman
Reidun Bjelland
Steven Shema
David M Fields
Jeffrey A Runge
Cameron Thompson
Haakon Hop
Source
Ecol Evol. 2017 Sep;7(18):7145-7160
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Ocean acidification is the increase in seawater pCO 2 due to the uptake of atmospheric anthropogenic CO 2, with the largest changes predicted to occur in the Arctic seas. For some marine organisms, this change in pCO 2, and associated decrease in pH, represents a climate change-related stressor. In this study, we investigated the gene expression patterns of nauplii of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis cultured at low pH levels. We have previously shown that organismal-level performance (development, growth, respiration) of C. glacialis nauplii is unaffected by low pH. Here, we investigated the molecular-level response to lowered pH in order to elucidate the physiological processes involved in this tolerance. Nauplii from wild-caught C. glacialis were cultured at four pH levels (8.05, 7.9, 7.7, 7.5). At stage N6, mRNA was extracted and sequenced using RNA-seq. The physiological functionality of the proteins identified was categorized using Gene Ontology and KEGG pathways. We found that the expression of 151 contigs varied significantly with pH on a continuous scale (93% downregulated with decreasing pH). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that, of the processes downregulated, many were components of the universal cellular stress response, including DNA repair, redox regulation, protein folding, and proteolysis. Sodium:proton antiporters were among the processes significantly upregulated, indicating that these ion pumps were involved in maintaining cellular pH homeostasis. C. glacialis significantly alters its gene expression at low pH, although they maintain normal larval development. Understanding what confers tolerance to some species will support our ability to predict the effects of future ocean acidification on marine organisms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28944006 View in PubMed
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The changing contribution of top-down and bottom-up limitation of mesopredators during 220 years of land use and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286122
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2017 May;86(3):566-576
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Marianne Pasanen-Mortensen
Bodil Elmhagen
Harto Lindén
Roger Bergström
Märtha Wallgren
Ype van der Velde
Sara A O Cousins
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2017 May;86(3):566-576
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Finland
Food chain
Foxes - physiology
Lynx - physiology
Population Dynamics
Predatory Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
Apex predators may buffer bottom-up driven ecosystem change, as top-down suppression may dampen herbivore and mesopredator responses to increased resource availability. However, theory suggests that for this buffering capacity to be realized, the equilibrium abundance of apex predators must increase. This raises the question: will apex predators maintain herbivore/mesopredator limitation, if bottom-up change relaxes resource constraints? Here, we explore changes in mesopredator (red fox Vulpes vulpes) abundance over 220 years in response to eradication and recovery of an apex predator (Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx), and changes in land use and climate which are linked to resource availability. A three-step approach was used. First, recent data from Finland and Sweden were modelled to estimate linear effects of lynx density, land use and winter temperature on fox density. Second, lynx density, land use and winter temperature was estimated in a 22 650 km(2) focal area in boreal and boreo-nemoral Sweden in the years 1830, 1920, 2010 and 2050. Third, the models and estimates were used to project historic and future fox densities in the focal area. Projected fox density was lowest in 1830 when lynx density was high, winters cold and the proportion of cropland low. Fox density peaked in 1920 due to lynx eradication, a mesopredator release boosted by favourable bottom-up changes - milder winters and cropland expansion. By 2010, lynx recolonization had reduced fox density, but it remained higher than in 1830, partly due to the bottom-up changes. Comparing 1830 to 2010, the contribution of top-down limitation decreased, while environment enrichment relaxed bottom-up limitation. Future scenarios indicated that by 2050, lynx density would have to increase by 79% to compensate for a projected climate-driven increase in fox density. We highlight that although top-down limitation in theory can buffer bottom-up change, this requires compensatory changes in apex predator abundance. Hence apex predator recolonization/recovery to historical levels would not be sufficient to compensate for widespread changes in climate and land use, which have relaxed the resource constraints for many herbivores and mesopredators. Variation in bottom-up conditions may also contribute to context dependence in apex predator effects.
PubMed ID
28075011 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of the lymphatic-dwelling filarioid nematode Rumenfilaria andersoni in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) and other cervids of North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286170
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2016 Aug 12;9(1):450
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2016
Author
Caroline M Grunenwald
Michelle Carstensen
Erik Hildebrand
Jacob Elam
Sauli Laaksonen
Antti Oksanen
Richard W Gerhold
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2016 Aug 12;9(1):450
Date
Aug-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood - parasitology
Cluster analysis
DNA, Helminth - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer - chemistry - genetics
Deer - parasitology
Filariasis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Filarioidea - isolation & purification
Finland
Microscopy
North America - epidemiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Moose (Alces alces) are a culturally and economically valued species in Minnesota, where the northeast population has decreased by 60 % since 2006. The cause of the decline is currently unclear; however, parasites, predation, and climate change have all been implicated. Nematode parasites are important pathogens in North American moose, potentially causing severe disease and mortality. Recent spread of Rumenfilaria andersoni, a filarioid nematode of moose, has been documented in Finnish cervids; however, little is known about the epidemiology of this parasite in North America.
To investigate the prevalence and distribution of R. andersoni, 584 blood samples were collected from live-captured and dead animals and screened microscopically for the presence of microfilariae using a modified Knott's test. Microfilariae were identified based on morphological characteristics. A subset of Knott's-positive animals was subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with filarioid-specific primers targeting the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1) of the rRNA gene cluster.
Rumenfilaria microfilariae were present in 20.5 % of Minnesota moose (n?=?352), with slight fluctuations observed over four years. Minnesota white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) (n?=?2) and moose (n?=?44) from Alaska, Montana, Washington, Maine, and New Hampshire also harbored R. andersoni, suggesting this parasite occurs widely throughout North American moose herds, and white-tailed deer can serve as a patent host. Sequence analysis of cervid blood (moose, n?=?15; white-tailed deer, n?=?1) confirmed the identity of R. andersoni and revealed the existence of two distinct clades. Genetic comparisons of R. andersoni isolates from North America and semi-domesticated Finnish reindeer found the two groups to be closely related, supporting previous hypotheses that R. andersoni was recently introduced into Finland by the importation of deer from the United States.
To the best of our knowledge these observations represent the first report of R. andersoni within the contiguous United States and reveal this nematode as a common parasite of North American moose and white-tailed deer. Although the implications of R. andersoni infection on moose health is unclear, increased awareness of this parasite will help prevent unintentional introduction of R. andersoni into naïve populations via the translocation of wild and captive cervids.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27519789 View in PubMed
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Food mail: the Canadian alternative to food stamps

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2864
Source
Pages 177-181 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Inuit communities in Canada are among those 47. A number of important changes have been made in application of the funding and to the postage rate structure since 1991, when DIAND assumed responsibility for administration of the Northern Air Stage Program. Instead of apply- ing the funding
  1 document  
Author
Hill, F.
Author Affiliation
Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 177-181 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Food Mail Program
Northern Air Stage Program
Northern Food Basket
Nutrition
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the impact of a selective transportation subsidy on food costs in isolated communities in Northern Canada, and the government's proposal to refine the "food mail" program to promote better nutrition. METHOD: The cost of various components of a Northern Food Basket has been monitored since 1990. An assessment of the probable impact and acceptability of program refinements was made through surveys of merchants and health and social service providers and focus group sessions. Decisions expected following consultations with stakeholders in March and April 1996 are also described. RESULTS: Costs of nutritious perishable food have been reduced in the Northwest Territories, and consumption of these foods in the Baffin region doubled within three years. Program refinements were proposed, with the objective of increasing intakes of calcium, folacin, and vitamin A, reducing dependency on convenience perishable foods, and reducing the cost of a healthy diet.
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Increase in leukotrienes in the coronary circulation by cooling: a study in the anesthetized dog

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2893
Source
Pages 316-319 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
; Leukotrienes; Cardiovascular function INTRODUCTION The background for the present study was a medical research program called cold climate research, established by the Norwegian Re- search Council. Cold climate research has dem- onstrated that survival of victims of hypother- mia is closely related to
  1 document  
Author
Ytrehus, K.
Tveita, T.
Hevroy, O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Tromso, Norway
Source
Pages 316-319 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animal experiments
Cardiovascular function
Cold adaptations
Hypothermia
Leukotrienes
Abstract
Pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs were instrumented for hemodynamic measurements and cooled by heat exchange tubes. Through a catheter in the coronary sinus, blood samples were obtained and plasma leukotrienes measured using a high-pressure liquid chromatography technique. Hemodynamic function was significantly reduced during cooling, and during subsequent rewarming hemodynamic function was only partly restored. Leukotriene C4 and B4 were significantly increased at a body core temperature of 31 degrees C and 25 degrees C during cooling but not during rewarming (28 degrees C) and after rewarming (37 degrees C). This indicates that during decreasing body temperature elevated leukotriene levels may increase vascular permeability, inflammation, and vasoactivity and counteract temperature-dependent decrease in these functions. Disturbed microcirculation may thus diminish cardiac recovery during rewarming.
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Both seed germination and seedling mortality increase with experimental warming and fertilization in a subarctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286227
Source
AoB Plants. 2017 Sep;9(5):plx040
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Ann Milbau
Nicolas Vandeplas
Fred Kockelbergh
Ivan Nijs
Source
AoB Plants. 2017 Sep;9(5):plx040
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Climate change is expected to force many species in arctic regions to migrate and track their climatic niche. This requires recruitment from seed, which currently shows very low rates in arctic regions, where long-lived and vegetatively reproducing plants dominate. Therefore, we pose the question whether recruitment (germination and seedling establishment) in arctic regions will significantly improve in a warmer world, and thus allow species to follow their climatic niche. We used a full factorial experiment to examine if realistic warmer temperatures (+3 ?C; infrared radiation) and increased nitrogen availability (+1.4 g N m(-2) year(-1)) affected germination, seedling survival and above- and below-ground seedling biomass in five species common in subarctic regions (Anthoxanthum odoratum, Betula nana, Pinus sylvestris, Solidago virgaurea, Vaccinium myrtillus). We found that warming increased seedling emergence in all species, but that subsequent mortality also increased, resulting in no net warming effect on seedling establishment. Warming slightly increased above-ground seedling biomass. Fertilization, on the other hand, did not influence seedling biomass, but it increased seedling establishment in B. nana while it reduced establishment in V. myrtillus. This may help B. nana dominate over V. myrtillus in warmer tundra. Surprisingly, no interactive effects between warming and fertilization were found. The lack of a general positive response of seedling establishment to warmer and more nutrient-rich conditions suggests that (sub)arctic species may experience difficulties in tracking their climatic niche. Predictions of future species distributions in arctic regions solely based on abiotic factors may therefore overestimate species' ranges due to their poor establishment. Also, the opposite response to fertilization of two key (sub)arctic dwarf shrubs, i.e. B. nana and V. myrtillus, could have important implications for the future development of arctic plant communities and argues for more research into the role of fertilization for plant establishment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29026511 View in PubMed
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Dispersal of thermophilic beetles across the intercontinental Arctic forest belt during the early Eocene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286232
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 11;7(1):12972
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-2017
Author
Adam J Brunke
Stylianos Chatzimanolis
Brian D Metscher
Karin Wolf-Schwenninger
Alexey Solodovnikov
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 11;7(1):12972
Date
Oct-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Massive biotic change occurred during the Eocene as the climate shifted from warm and equable to seasonal and latitudinally stratified. Mild winter temperatures across Arctic intercontinental land bridges permitted dispersal of frost-intolerant groups until the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, while trans-Arctic dispersal in thermophilic groups may have been limited to the early Eocene, especially during short-lived hyperthermals. Some of these lineages are now disjunct between continents of the northern hemisphere. Although Eocene climate change may have been one of the most important drivers of these ancient patterns in modern animal and plant distributions, its particular events are rarely implicated or correlated with group-specific climatic requirements. Here we explored the climatic and geological drivers of a particularly striking Neotropical-Oriental disjunct distribution in the rove beetle Bolitogyrus, a suspected Eocene relict. We integrated evidence from Eocene fossils, distributional and climate data, paleoclimate, paleogeography, and phylogenetic divergence dating to show that intercontinental dispersal of Bolitogyrus ceased in the early Eocene, consistent with the termination of conditions required by thermophilic lineages. These results provide new insight into the poorly known and short-lived Arctic forest community of the Early Eocene and its surviving lineages.
PubMed ID
29021627 View in PubMed
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Introduction [Food Security and Our Environments]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286382
Source
Pages 315-316 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
environ- ment. It was not surprising, then, to see a focus on access to traditional foods at the Congress. Specific attention was given to climate change, as it has a major impact on food secu rity in circum- polar regions. Currently, alterations are being seen in the natural habitat for both
  1 document  
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Research in Greenland, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Source
Pages 315-316 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Abstracts: Oral presentations [Food Security and Our Environments]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286383
Source
Pages 317-333 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
, fuel, guns, ammunition) and the seasonal hunting cycle is not reflecti ve of work schedules and schooling . Meanwhile, food purchased at stores is also increasingly cost ly in the Arctic and can often be of poor quality and nutritiona l value. The impact of climate change on country food
  1 document  
Source
Pages 317-333 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Abstracts: Posters [Food Security and Our Environments]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286384
Source
Pages 334-345 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
information about successful interventions in the territory; the importance of harvesting country food and its impact on food security; the repercussions of increasing fuel prices on harvesting country food; climate change and its relation to food security; and information about the Food Mail program
  1 document  
Source
Pages 334-345 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Climate change, water quality, and human health in Nunatsiavut, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286387
Source
Pages 335-336 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
CLIMATE CHANGE, WATER QUALITY, AND HUMAN HEAL TH IN NUNATSIAVUT, CANADA 5. Harper 1 , V.L. Edge 1 ' 2 , C. Wallace3 , S.A. McEwen 1 1 Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph ON, 2 0ffice of Public Health Practice, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph ON, 3
  1 document  
Author
S. Harper
V.L. Edge
C. Wallace
S.A. McEwen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph ON
0ffice of Public Health Practice, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph ON
International Network on Water, Environment and Health, United Nations University, Hamilton ON
Source
Pages 335-336 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
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Ethical aspects in the environmental health research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286398
Source
Page 344 and page 386 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
the Northern societies there is a huge change on-going not only in climate, ecosystems, but also in socio-economic and cultural issues. Environmental research is always multidisciplinary and thus we need to consider research ethics also from multidisciplinary point of view. Our aim is to find good
  1 document  
Author
K. Vahakangas
A. Rautio
A.M. Pietila
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pharmacology and Toxicology, and Nursing Science, University of Kuopio
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland
Source
Page 344 and page 386 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 9. Indigenous Health and Wellbeing.
Documents
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Impacts of climate change on Inuit diet in the Western Arctic: links between climate change, food security and nutritional health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286399
Source
Page 345 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INUIT DIET IN THE WESTERN ARCTIC LINKS BETWEEN CLIMATE CHANGE, FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITIONAL HEAL TH 5. Wesche, L.H.M. Chan University of Northern British Columbia There is a nutrition transition occurring among Indigenous peoples globally. Similar trends are
  1 document  
Author
S. Wesche
L.H.M. Chan
Author Affiliation
University of Northern British Columbia
Source
Page 345 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Contaminants, health, effective risk assessment and communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286400
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
, RundmoT. Explaining Risk Perception. An evaluation of cultural t heory. Trondheim, Norway: Rotunde Publisher; 2004. 6. Furga l C, Fletcher C, Dickson C. Ways of knowing and understanding: towards the convergence of trad itional and scientifi c knowledge of climate change in the Canadian North. Ca
  1 document  
Author
Katelyn Friendship
Chris Furgal
Author Affiliation
Frost Centre for Canadian Studies- Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Studies Department, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Risk Management
Risk perception
Traditional foods
Contaminants
Traditional knowledge
Collaboration
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Abstract
Objectives: With a better understanding of northern Indigenous risk perceptions related to food safety, this research aims to identify the role that Indigenous knowledge can play in risk assessment and management processes in order to support and ensure more culturally relevant and effective benefit-risk management strategies. Study design: This work is a part of a circumpolar review that is conducting case study evaluations in four regions on the topic of Indigenous environmental health benefit-risk assessment and communication in relation to contaminant exposure through the consumption of traditional/country foods. Methods: This project examines a series of events and communities in Yukon Territory, Canada. Forty-one interviews with traditional food experts (TFE) and environment and health decision-makers (HEDM) were conducted and analysed for thematic content. The research also included an extensive document review. Results: Overall, people are confident in their own ways of determining the safety of food items. This is predominately based on physical indicators. Of the HEDM interviewees, there were varied levels of experience for including traditional knowledge in risk management; 45% had direct experience, 36% had experience in other aspects of research and 18% had no direct experience. All interviewees discussed collaboration as a valuable process for effective risk management. Conclusions: â??Effective risk management" is dictated by the effort given to include the affected communities or populations. Yukon First Nations have their own way for determining food safety, and these methods and perceptions need to be considered in the framing of risk issues and from the initial stages of the management process. True collaboration is crucial for effectiveness.
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Establishing the Joint National Committee on Aboriginal AIDS Education and Prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3043
Source
Pages 363-367 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
population. The teen pregnancy rates confirm this. We also know that with the high rates of SIDs among aboriginal people, we can speculate that the sexual activity is with multiple sex partncl'S. These facts combined suggest that the climate for the spread of HIV infection and AIDS among aborigi- nal
  1 document  
Author
R A Imrie
Author Affiliation
Federal Centre for AIDS, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Pages 363-367 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health education
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Organizations, Nonprofit
PubMed ID
1365155 View in PubMed
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