Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2573 records – page 2 of 129.

Implications of abrupt climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95699
Source
Trans Am Clin Climatol Assoc. 2004;115:305-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Alley Richard B
Author Affiliation
Department of Geosciences and EMS Environment Institute, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ralleyo@essc.psu.edu
Source
Trans Am Clin Climatol Assoc. 2004;115:305-17
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
International Agencies
Models, Biological
Time Factors
Abstract
Records of past climates contained in ice cores, ocean sediments, and other archives show that large, abrupt, widespread climate changes have occurred repeatedly in the past. These changes were especially prominent during the cooling into and warming out of the last ice age, but persisted into the modern warm interval. Changes have especially affected water availability in warm regions and temperature in cold regions, but have affected almost all climatic variables across much or all of the Earth. Impacts of climate changes are smaller if the changes are slower or more-expected. The rapidity of abrupt climate changes, together with the difficulty of predicting such changes, means that impacts on the health of humans, economies and ecosystems will be larger if abrupt climate changes occur. Most projections of future climate include only gradual changes, whereas paleoclimatic data plus models indicate that abrupt changes remain possible; thus, policy is being made based on a view of the future that may be optimistic.
PubMed ID
17060975 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J R Soc Promot Health. 2002 Jun;122(2):134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Fryer Frederick
Source
J R Soc Promot Health. 2002 Jun;122(2):134
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
PubMed ID
12134766 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Infectious diseases and climate change]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95348
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Valentiner-Branth Palle
Glismann Steffen Offersen
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Epidemiologisk Afdeling, DK-2300 København S, Denmark.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Climate
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Europe - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Insect Vectors
Risk factors
Rodentia
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Climate changes will likely have an impact on the spectrum of infectious diseases in Europe. We may see an increase in vector-borne diseases, diseases spread by rodents such as Hantavirus, and food- and water-borne diseases. As the effects of climate changes are likely to occur gradually, a modern industrialised country such as Denmark will have the opportunity to adapt to the expected changes.
PubMed ID
19857396 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3165-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Kaas Eigil
Author Affiliation
Niels Bohr Instituttet, Københavns Universitet, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 København �, Denmark. kaas@gfy.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3165-8
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Abstract
This article provides a brief overview over some of the main findings in the most recent IPCC WG I report and in articles published after the report. It is argued that the conclusions in the report on observed climate variations and trends during the last 100 years have been largely confirmed or even reinforced by the most recent studies. Concerning future climate change, new analyses of possible changes in sea-level, which take melting land ice into account, indicate that the global sea level may rise as much as one meter within the present century.
PubMed ID
19857392 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2007 Jul 15;365(1856):1925-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2007
Author
Hansen James
Sato Makiko
Kharecha Pushker
Russell Gary
Lea David W
Siddall Mark
Author Affiliation
NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University Earth Institute, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, USA.
Source
Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2007 Jul 15;365(1856):1925-54
Date
Jul-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Palaeoclimate data show that the Earth's climate is remarkably sensitive to global forcings. Positive feedbacks predominate. This allows the entire planet to be whipsawed between climate states. One feedback, the 'albedo flip' property of ice/water, provides a powerful trigger mechanism. A climate forcing that 'flips' the albedo of a sufficient portion of an ice sheet can spark a cataclysm. Inertia of ice sheet and ocean provides only moderate delay to ice sheet disintegration and a burst of added global warming. Recent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions place the Earth perilously close to dramatic climate change that could run out of our control, with great dangers for humans and other creatures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the largest human-made climate forcing, but other trace constituents are also important. Only intense simultaneous efforts to slow CO2 emissions and reduce non-CO2 forcings can keep climate within or near the range of the past million years. The most important of the non-CO2 forcings is methane (CH4), as it causes the second largest human-made GHG climate forcing and is the principal cause of increased tropospheric ozone (O3), which is the third largest GHG forcing. Nitrous oxide (N2O) should also be a focus of climate mitigation efforts. Black carbon ('black soot') has a high global warming potential (approx. 2000, 500 and 200 for 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively) and deserves greater attention. Some forcings are especially effective at high latitudes, so concerted efforts to reduce their emissions could preserve Arctic ice, while also having major benefits for human health, agricultural productivity and the global environment.
PubMed ID
17513270 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1260-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
James D Ford
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. james.ford@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1260-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Developing Countries
Health status
Humans
Population Groups
Vulnerable Populations
World Health
Abstract
Indigenous populations have been identified as vulnerable to climate change. This framing, however, is detached from the diverse geographies of how people experience, understand, and respond to climate-related health outcomes, and overlooks nonclimatic determinants. I reviewed research on indigenous health and climate change to capture place-based dimensions of vulnerability and broader determining factors. Studies focused primarily on Australia and the Arctic, and indicated significant adaptive capacity, with active responses to climate-related health risks. However, nonclimatic stresses including poverty, land dispossession, globalization, and associated sociocultural transitions challenge this adaptability. Addressing geographic gaps in existing studies alongside greater focus on indigenous conceptualizations on and approaches to health, examination of global-local interactions shaping local vulnerability, enhanced surveillance, and an evaluation of policy support opportunities are key foci for future research.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2009 Sep 24;461(7263):472-519779433
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-7519577695
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2010 Apr;55(2):123-3220033251
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-90020025229
Cites: Acta Trop. 2010 Jul-Aug;115(1-2):112-820188688
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Jun;69(3):285-30320519090
Cites: N S W Public Health Bull. 2010 May-Jun;21(5-6):139-4520637171
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-20120737808
Cites: Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2011 Jan 13;369(1934):6-1921115510
Cites: Nature. 2011 Jan 20;469(7330):29921248825
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-6121560272
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2011 May;101(5):814-2121490335
Cites: Ecohealth. 2010 Sep;7(3):361-7320680394
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Mar;8(1):93-10821785890
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2009 Oct;87(10):799-80119876548
Cites: Lancet. 2009 May 16;373(9676):1693-73319447250
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Feb 5;355(9202):442-5010841124
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;186(7):983-9012232839
Cites: Environ Res. 2002 Oct;90(2):76-8812483797
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Jul 8;100(14):8074-912792023
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1989;29(4):487-962756435
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):478-8616440610
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 10;367(9526):1937-4616765763
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2019-2816782493
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2029-3116782494
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Dec;114(12):1930-417185287
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Dec;114(12):1964-7017185292
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Mar;85(3):235-717486218
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Nov;135(8):1307-1517224087
Cites: Int J Environ Health Res. 2008 Feb;18(1):37-6318231945
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:24017854481
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Jan;14(1):18-2418258072
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Nov;67(9):1423-3318676079
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Nov;35(5):468-7818929973
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Nov;35(5):501-718929976
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Nov;35(5):527-3818929979
Comment In: Am J Public Health. 2013 Jan;103(1):e623153166
Comment In: Am J Public Health. 2013 Jan;103(1):e6-723153162
PubMed ID
22594718 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Page 325 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010 2009
INUITWOMEN AND CLIMATE CHANGE Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada facilitated a dialogue with Inuit women from across Inuit Nunaat about how climate change is affecting their lives. This gathering, held in Iqaluit, Nunavut, in March 2009, created an opportunity
  1 document  
Author
Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada
Author Affiliation
Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada
Source
Page 325 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Climate change
Food security
Inuit
Nunaat
Women
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
Less detail
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
World Wide Fund For Nature
Language
English
Spanish
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Witnesses to Change
Climate change
Arctic Regions
Abstract
This is WWF's webpage covering climate change in the Arctic. It includes links to reports, videos, news feeds, and blogs.
Online Resources
Less detail

Climate change, thermal stress and mortality changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96002
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Feb;46(3):331-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
Martens W J
Author Affiliation
Maastricht University, Department of Mathematics, The Netherlands.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Feb;46(3):331-44
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body Temperature Regulation
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate
Female
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Heat Stress Disorders - etiology - mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology - mortality
Temperature
World Health
Abstract
One of the potential effects of an anthropogenically induced climate change is a change in mortality related to thermal stress. In this paper, existing literature on the relationship between average temperatures and mortality is evaluated. By means of a simple meta-analysis an aggregated effect of a change in temperature on mortality is estimated for total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality. These effect estimates are combined with projections of changes in baseline climate conditions of 20 cities, according to climate change scenarios of three General Circulation Models (GCMs). The results indicate that for most of the cities included, global climate change is likely to lead to a reduction in mortality rates due to decreasing winter mortality. This effect is most pronounced for cardiovascular mortality in elderly people in cities which experience temperate or cold climates at present. The sensitivity of the results to physiological and socio-economical adaptation is examined. However, more research is necessary to extend this work by inclusion of data from a wider range of populations.
PubMed ID
9460815 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
SGI Quarterly.
Date
Apr-2009
  1 website  
Author
Hassol, SJ
Corell, RW
Source
SGI Quarterly.
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Abstract
Climate change is taking place at the same time as many other changes in the Arctic, including an increase in chemical contaminants entering the Arctic from other regions, overfishing, land-use changes that result in habitat destruction and fragmentation, as well as cultural, governance and economic changes. Impacts on the environment and society result from the interplay of all of these changes.
Online Resources
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Apr 16;185(7):587
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2013
Author
Courtney Howard
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Apr 16;185(7):587
Date
Apr-16-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Climate change
Health education
Humans
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2013 Feb 19;185(3):19523382259
PubMed ID
23589540 View in PubMed
Less detail
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Sea Grant
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Animals
Climate change
Permafrost
Introduced species
Ice
Ecosystem
Floods
Freezing
Abstract
Seventeen-minute video produced by Alaska Sea Grant and NOAA Alaska Region.
Online Resources
Less detail

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288485
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Language
Arabic
Chinese
English
French
Russian
Spanish
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
Climate Change
United Nations
Meteorology
Environment
Abstract
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to provide the world with a clear scientific view on the current state of climate change and its potential environmental and socioeconomic consequences.
Online Resources
Less detail

RISE: Climate Change and Coastal Communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288538
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Claire Schoen Media
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Floods
Climate change
Bays
San Francisco
Weather
Climate
Abstract
Media project looking at the San Francisco Bay area for answers on how to start adapting to changes that are now inevitable.
Online Resources
Less detail

Linking climate change to lemming cycles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91357
Source
Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-2008
Author
Kausrud Kyrre L
Mysterud Atle
Steen Harald
Vik Jon Olav
Østbye Eivind
Cazelles Bernard
Framstad Erik
Eikeset Anne Maria
Mysterud Ivar
Solhøy Torstein
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):93-7
Date
Nov-6-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - physiology
Birds - physiology
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humidity
Models, Biological
Norway
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Snow
Temperature
Abstract
The population cycles of rodents at northern latitudes have puzzled people for centuries, and their impact is manifest throughout the alpine ecosystem. Climate change is known to be able to drive animal population dynamics between stable and cyclic phases, and has been suggested to cause the recent changes in cyclic dynamics of rodents and their predators. But although predator-rodent interactions are commonly argued to be the cause of the Fennoscandian rodent cycles, the role of the environment in the modulation of such dynamics is often poorly understood in natural systems. Hence, quantitative links between climate-driven processes and rodent dynamics have so far been lacking. Here we show that winter weather and snow conditions, together with density dependence in the net population growth rate, account for the observed population dynamics of the rodent community dominated by lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) in an alpine Norwegian core habitat between 1970 and 1997, and predict the observed absence of rodent peak years after 1994. These local rodent dynamics are coherent with alpine bird dynamics both locally and over all of southern Norway, consistent with the influence of large-scale fluctuations in winter conditions. The relationship between commonly available meteorological data and snow conditions indicates that changes in temperature and humidity, and thus conditions in the subnivean space, seem to markedly affect the dynamics of alpine rodents and their linked groups. The pattern of less regular rodent peaks, and corresponding changes in the overall dynamics of the alpine ecosystem, thus seems likely to prevail over a growing area under projected climate change.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):43-418987726
PubMed ID
18987742 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change: the importance of place.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91596
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2008 Nov;35(5):468-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Hess Jeremy J
Malilay Josephine N
Parkinson Alan J
Author Affiliation
National Center for Environmental Health, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717, USA. aso1@cdc.gov
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2008 Nov;35(5):468-78
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cities
Communicable Diseases - transmission
Desert Climate
Geography
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Public Health
Risk factors
Seawater - chemistry
United States
Weather
Abstract
Climate change-related risks are place-specific and path-dependent. Accordingly, location is an important determinant of hazardous exposure, and certain places will bear more risk than others. This article reviews the major environmental exposures associated with risky places in the U.S., including coastal regions, islands, the desert Southwest, vectorborne and zoonotic disease border regions, cities, and the U.S. Arctic (Alaska), with emphasis on exposures and vulnerable populations of concern. In addition to these hotspots, this study considers the ways in which the concept of place--the sense of human relationship with particular environments--will play a key role in motivating, developing, and deploying an effective public health response. In considering the importance of place, we highlight the concepts of community resilience and risk management, key aspects of a robust response to climate change in public health and other sectors.
PubMed ID
18929973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polar Marine Microorganisms and Climate Change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276922
Source
Adv Microb Physiol. 2016;69:187-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
C. Verde
D. Giordano
C M Bellas
G. di Prisco
A M Anesio
Source
Adv Microb Physiol. 2016;69:187-215
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The large diversity of marine microorganisms harboured by oceans plays an important role in planet sustainability by driving globally important biogeochemical cycles; all primary and most secondary production in the oceans is performed by microorganisms. The largest part of the planet is covered by cold environments; consequently, cold-adapted microorganisms have crucial functional roles in globally important environmental processes and biogeochemical cycles cold-adapted extremophiles are a remarkable model to shed light on the molecular basis of survival at low temperature. The indigenous populations of Antarctic and Arctic microorganisms are endowed with genetic and physiological traits that allow them to live and effectively compete at the temperatures prevailing in polar regions. Some genes, e.g. glycosyltransferases and glycosylsynthetases involved in the architecture of the cell wall, may have been acquired/retained during evolution of polar strains or lost in tropical strains. This present work focusses on temperature and its role in shaping microbial adaptations; however, in assessing the impacts of climate changes on microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycles in polar oceans, it should not be forgotten that physiological studies need to include the interaction of temperature with other abiotic and biotic factors.
PubMed ID
27720011 View in PubMed
Less detail

The physician's response to climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95416
Source
Fam Med. 2009 May;41(5):358-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Sarfaty Mona
Abouzaid Safiya
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Thomas Jefferson University. mona.sarfaty@jefferson.edu
Source
Fam Med. 2009 May;41(5):358-63
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Diseases - transmission
Conservation of Energy Resources
Disasters
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Physician's Role
Population Surveillance
Public Policy
Abstract
Climate change will have an effect on the health and well-being of the populations cared for by practicing physicians. The anticipated medical effects include heat- and cold-related deaths, cardiovascular illnesses, injuries and mental harms from extreme weather events, respiratory illnesses caused by poor air quality, infectious diseases that emanate from contaminated food, water, or spread of disease vectors, the injuries caused by natural disasters, and the mental harm associated with social disruption. Within several years, such medical problems are likely to reach the doorsteps of many physicians. In the face of this reality, physicians should assume their traditional roles as medical professionals, health educators, and community leaders. Clinicians provide individual health services to patients, some of whom will be especially vulnerable to the emerging health consequences of global warming. Physicians also work in academic medical institutions and hospitals that educate and provide continuing medical education to students, residents, and practitioners. The institutions also produce a measurable carbon footprint. Societies of physicians at national, state, and local levels can choose to use their well-developed avenues of communication to raise awareness of the key issues that are raised by climate change as well as other environmental concerns that have profound implications for human health and well-being.
PubMed ID
19418286 View in PubMed
Less detail

2573 records – page 2 of 129.