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IPCC Workshop on Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275990
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-2010
  1 website  
Author
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Antarctica
Glaciers
Greenland
Ice caps
Ice sheets
Observations
Projections
Sea level
Abstract
Sea level rise is one of the major long-term consequences of human-induced climate change. Future projections of sea level changes and their regional expression are of crucial importance for the sustainability of coastal settlements around the world. The Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC (AR4) had comprehensively assessed key processes contributing to past, present and future sea level changes. However, process understanding was limited and thus both size and uncertainties associated with some of these contributions remained still largely unknown. This also hampered the overall projections of global mean sea level rise in AR4. The future dynamical behaviour of the large polar ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland in a changing climate was identified as the primary origin of the large uncertainty in the AR4 projections of sea level rise for the 21st century. IPCC Working Group I (WGI) has acknowledged the relevance of this specific topic and thus (1) proposed a chapter on 'Sea Level Change' in its contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and (2) organized a targeted IPCC Workshop on 'Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities' very early in the assessment cycle for the IPCC's AR5. This Workshop took place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 21 to 24 June, 2010. The Workshop brought together experts from very diverse disciplines with a wide range of expertise, covering oceanography, ice sheet dynamics, glacier research and hydrology to discuss latest results from both observations and modelling relevant for sea level change. The workshop structure included a combination of plenary sessions with invited keynote presentations, group discussions, poster sessions and, finally, topical breakout groups. This Workshop Report contains a concise summary of the overall discussions and conclusions of the Workshop as well as summaries of the discussions in the breakout groups. It further includes the extended abstracts of the keynote presentations and poster abstracts presented during the Workshop.
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Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Aug 10;171(33):2331
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2009
Author
Bønløkke Jakob Hjort
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Aug 10;171(33):2331
Date
Aug-10-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Denmark
Humans
Societies, Medical
World Health
PubMed ID
19739323 View in PubMed
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Climate change. Whither Arctic climate?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95914
Source
Science. 2003 Jan 10;299(5604):215-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2003
Author
Shindell Drew
Author Affiliation
NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025, USA. dshindell@giss.nasa.gov
Source
Science. 2003 Jan 10;299(5604):215-6
Date
Jan-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
PubMed ID
12522240 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Oregon
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Witnesses to Change
Indians
North American
Climate change
Alaska Natives
Climate
Abstract
This is a collaborative project between the University of Oregon Environmental Studies Program and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station. The project aims to understand the needs, lessons learned, and opportunities American Indians and Alaska Natives have in planning for the physical effects of climate change. This information will be used to inform resource management decision-making in the context of climate change.
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Northern Arizona University
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Climate change
Environment
Indians
North American
Abstract
Videos and other formats illustrate the importance of traditional knowledge in the study of climate change and its impacts.
Online Resources
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Nurs Ethics. 2006 Nov;13(6):571-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Geoffrey Hunt
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2006 Nov;13(6):571-2
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Greenhouse Effect
Health planning
Humans
Public Health
World Health
PubMed ID
17193799 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Spanish
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Cold Temperature
Floods
Hot Temperature
Asthma
Mental health
Weather
Climate
Air Pollution
Abstract
Informative materials from The National Library of Medicine.
Online Resources
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Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3194-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Lidegaard Øjvind
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, Gynaekologisk Klinik, og Københavns Universitet, København Ø, Denmark. Lidegaard@rg.regionh.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3194-7
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
World Health
Abstract
The majority of physicians are aware of the urgency of preventing major global warming, and of the global health consequences such warming could bring. Therefore, we should perhaps be more motivated to mitigate these climate changes. The Danish Medical Association should stress the importance of preventing major global climate health disasters, and the need for ambitious international reduction agreements. In our advice and treatment of patients, focus could be on mutually shared strategies comprising mitigation of global warming and changing of life-style habits to improve our general health.
PubMed ID
19857401 View in PubMed
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Nature. 2008 Apr 17;452(7189):798-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2008
Author
Witze Alexandra
Source
Nature. 2008 Apr 17;452(7189):798-802
Date
Apr-17-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Geography
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Ice Cover
Phase Transition
Seasons
Spacecraft
Uncertainty
Water Movements
PubMed ID
18431825 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Jun 19;17(12):R435-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-2007
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Jun 19;17(12):R435-36
Date
Jun-19-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Canada
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Humans
Ice Cover
Seasons
Travel
PubMed ID
17647302 View in PubMed
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Source
Lancet. 1994 Jan 29;343(8892):304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-1994
Author
J. Last
Source
Lancet. 1994 Jan 29;343(8892):304
Date
Jan-29-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental health
Health Priorities
Humans
Patient care team
Research
World Health
PubMed ID
7905135 View in PubMed
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Source
Conserv Biol. 2010 Feb;24(1):10-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Mark C Serreze
Author Affiliation
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80907, USA. serreze@kryos.colorado.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2010 Feb;24(1):10-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Greenhouse Effect
Abstract
The Earth's atmosphere has a natural greenhouse effect, without which the global mean surface temperature would be about 33 degrees C lower and life would not be possible. Human activities have increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and other gases in trace amounts. This has enhanced the greenhouse effect, resulting in surface warming. Were it not for the partly offsetting effects of increased aerosol concentrations, the increase in global mean surface temperature over the past 100 years would be larger than observed. Continued surface warming through the 21st century is inevitable and will likely have widespread ecological impacts. The magnitude and rate of warming for the global average will be largely dictated by the strength and direction of climate feedbacks, thermal inertia of the oceans, the rate of greenhouse gas emissions, and aerosol concentrations. Because of regional expressions of climate feedbacks, changes in atmospheric circulation, and a suite of other factors, the magnitude and rate of warming and changes in other key climate elements, such as precipitation, will not be uniform across the planet. For example, due to loss of its floating sea-ice cover, the Arctic will warm the most.
PubMed ID
20121837 View in PubMed
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Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper) Climate change adaptation in Norway C lim ate change adaptation in N orw ay M eld . St. 3 3 (2 0 1 2 –2 0 1 3 ) R ep o rt to th e Sto rtin g (w h ite p ap er) Published by: Norwegian Ministry of the Environment
  1 document  
Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
12235129
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Documents

stm201220130033000engpdfs.pdf

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Trends Parasitol. 2015 Apr 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2015
Author
Andy Dobson
Péter K Molnár
Susan Kutz
Source
Trends Parasitol. 2015 Apr 17;
Date
Apr-17-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Climate is changing rapidly in the Arctic. This has important implications for parasites of Arctic ungulates, and hence for the welfare of Arctic peoples who depend on caribou, reindeer, and muskoxen for food, income, and a focus for cultural activities. In this Opinion article we briefly review recent work on the development of predictive models for the impacts of climate change on helminth parasites and other pathogens of Arctic wildlife, in the hope that such models may eventually allow proactive mitigation and conservation strategies. We describe models that have been developed using the metabolic theory of ecology. The main strength of these models is that they can be easily parameterized using basic information about the physical size of the parasite. Initial results suggest they provide important new insights that are likely to generalize to a range of host-parasite systems.
PubMed ID
25900882 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Government of Canada
Language
English
French
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Canada
Climate Change
Government
Policy
Abstract
This is a Government of Canada website that reviews policies, programs, scientific research, and interdepartmental work being done to fight climate change in Canada.
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Columbia Law School
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
United States
Climate Change
Lawyers
Climate
Abstract
The Center for Climate Change Law (CCCL) at Columbia Law School develops legal techniques to fight climate change, trains law students and lawyers in their use, and develops databases on climate law and regulation.
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
United States
Climate Change
Health Resources
Abstract
This is the U.S. Forest Service's reference website for resource managers and decision makers who need information and tools to address climate change in planning and project implementation.
Online Resources
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Norwegian Climate Change Adaptation Programme

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288522
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Climate Change Adaptation Programme
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Norway
Climate Change
Acclimatization
Adaptation
Research
Abstract
This portal is designed to gain better knowledge through research, mapping, and practical experience to aid in the climate change adaptation process. Note that much of the portal is in Norwegian.
Online Resources
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[Infectious diseases and climate change]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95348
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Valentiner-Branth Palle
Glismann Steffen Offersen
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Epidemiologisk Afdeling, DK-2300 København S, Denmark.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Climate
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Europe - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Insect Vectors
Risk factors
Rodentia
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Climate changes will likely have an impact on the spectrum of infectious diseases in Europe. We may see an increase in vector-borne diseases, diseases spread by rodents such as Hantavirus, and food- and water-borne diseases. As the effects of climate changes are likely to occur gradually, a modern industrialised country such as Denmark will have the opportunity to adapt to the expected changes.
PubMed ID
19857396 View in PubMed
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Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
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2832 records – page 1 of 142.