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Publication Type
Report
Date
Apr-2009
Sustainable Development Working Group 2009 1 Arctic Council Ministerial April 2009 Arctic Human Health Initiative Report Summary The International Polar Year (IPY) represents a unique opportunity to focus world attention on Arctic human health and to further stimulate
  1 document  
Author
Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
134429
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP)
Arctic peoples
Climate change
Communication
Community action
Environmental contaminants
Health promotion
Health Research
Human health
International Polar Year (IPY)
International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH)
Outreach
Prevention strategies
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) represents a unique opportunity to focus world attention on Arctic human health and to further stimulate circumpolar cooperation on emerging Arctic human health concerns. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) isan Arctic Council IPY initiative that aims to build and expand on existing Arctic Council and International Union for Circumpolar Health?s human health research activities. The human health legacy of the IPY will be increased visibility of the human health concerns of arctic communities, revitalization of cooperative arctic human health research focused on those concerns, the development of health policies based on research findings, and thesubsequent implementation of appropriate interventions, prevention and control measures at the community level.
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Arctic_Human_Health_Initiative_Report_2009.pdf

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The Arctic Human Health Initiative: The online resource at www.arctichealth.org

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257265
Source
Page 530 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
THE ARCTIC HUMAN HEAL TH INITIATIVE, THE ONLINE RESOURCE ATWWW.ARCTICHEAL TH.ORG 5.A. Rolin, 5. Smith, A.J. Parkinson Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska, US, and Department of Health Sciences, University of Alaska, Anchorage, US The
  1 document  
Author
Rolin SA
Smith S
Parkinson AJ
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska, US, and Department of Health Sciences, University of Alaska, Anchorage, US
Source
Page 530 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Alaska
Online
Research
Arctic health
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 13. Building Health Services Resources and Research Capacity.
Documents
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The International Polar Year 2007-2008: The Arctic human health legacy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84174
Source
Pages 11-13 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):11-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Circumpolar cooperation on emerging Arctic human health concerns. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) is an Arctic Council IPY initiative that aims to build and expand on existing Arctic Council and International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) human health research activities. The human health
  1 document  
Author
Parkinson, AJ
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 995098, USA. ajp1@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 11-13 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):11-13
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic Human Health Initiative
International Polar Year
Abstract
Life expectancy in Arctic populations has greatly improved over the last 50 years. Much of this improvement can be attributed health research that has resulted in a reduction in morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, and the vaccine-preventable diseases of childhood. However, despite these improvements in health indicators of Arctic residents, life expectancy and infant mortality remain higher in indigenous Arctic residents in the US Arctic, northern Canada, and Greenland when compared to Arctic residents of Nordic countries. The International Polar Year (IPY) represents a unique opportunity to focus world attention on Arctic human health and to further stimulate Circumpolar cooperation on emerging Arctic human health concerns. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) is an Arctic Council IPY initiative that aims to build and expand on existing Arctic Council and International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) human health research activities. The human health legacy of the IPY will be increased visibility of the human health concerns of Arctic communities, revitalization of cooperative Arctic human health research focused on those concerns, the development of health policies based on research findings, and the subsequent implementation of appropriate interventions, prevention and control measures at the community level.
PubMed ID
17929599 View in PubMed
Documents
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The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107822
Source
Pages 69-86 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):69-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
FEATURED PRESENTATIONS The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007- 2009 Alan J. Parkinson* Arctic Investigations Program, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA Background. The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008
  1 document  
Author
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. ajp1@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 69-86 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):69-86
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Awareness
Communicable diseases - ethnology
Cooperative Behavior
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Mental Health - ethnology
Population Surveillance
Research
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
World Health
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) was a US-led Arctic Council IPY coordinating project that aimed to build and expand on existing International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and Arctic Council human health interests. The project aimed to link researchers with potential international collaborators and to serve as a focal point for human health research, education, outreach and communication activities during the IPY. The progress of projects conducted as part of this initiative up until the end of the Arctic Council Swedish chairmanship in May 2013 is summarized in this report.
The overall goals of the AHHI was to increase awareness and visibility of human health concerns of Arctic peoples, foster human health research, and promote health strategies that will improve health and well-being of all Arctic residents. Proposed activities to be recognized through the initiative included: expanding research networks that will enhance surveillance and monitoring of health issues of concern to Arctic peoples, and increase collaboration and coordination of human health research; fostering research that will examine the health impact of anthropogenic pollution, rapid modernization and economic development, climate variability, infectious and chronic diseases, intentional and unintentional injuries, promoting education, outreach and communication that will focus public and political attention on Arctic health issues, using a variety of publications, printed and electronic reports from scientific conferences, symposia and workshops targeting researchers, students, communities and policy makers; promoting the translation of research into health policy and community action including implementation of prevention strategies and health promotion; and promoting synergy and strategic direction of Arctic human health research and health promotion.
As of 31 March, 2009, the official end of the IPY, AHHI represented a total of 38 proposals, including 21 individual Expressions of Intent (EoI), and 9 full proposals (FP), submitted to the IPY Joint Committee for review and approval from lead investigators from the US, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Russian Federation. In addition, there were 10 National Initiatives (NI-projects undertaken during IPY beyond the IPY Joint Committee review process). Individual project details can be viewed at www.arctichealth.org. The AHHI currently monitors the progress of 28 individual active human health projects in the following thematic areas: health network expansion (5 projects), infectious disease research (7 projects), environmental health research (7 projects), behavioral and mental health research (4 projects), and outreach education and communication (5 projects).
While some projects have been completed, others will continue well beyond the IPY. The IPY 2007-2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23971017 View in PubMed
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The International Polar Year (2007-2009) and the Arctic Human Health Initiative: accomplishments, challenges and a vision for the next polar year

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284447
Source
Pages 25-29 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69(Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
OVERVIEW II: INTERNATIONAL POLAR YEAR - Overview II. International Polar Year THE INTERNATIONAL POLAR YEAR (2007-2009) AND THE ARCTIC HUMAN HEALTH INITIATIVE: ACCOMPLISHMENTS, CHALLENGES AND A VISION FOR THE NEXT POLAR YEAR Alan J. Parkinson Arctic Investigations Program Centers for
  1 document  
Author
Alan J. Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 25-29 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69(Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Overview II. International Polar Year
Documents
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Analysis of Arctic children and youth health indicators

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100826
Source
Report produced for the Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Analysis of Arctic Children and Youth Health Indicators Produced for the Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group Future of Children and Youth of the Arctic Initiative, Report of the Health Programme Analysis of Arctic Children and Youth
  1 document  
Author
Future of Children and Youth of the Arctic Initiative, Health Programme
Source
Report produced for the Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
File Size
887005
Keywords
Breastfeeding
Child abuse and neglect
Children and youth
Demography
Education
Health outcomes
Immunization
Infant mortality
Infectious diseases
Injuries
Low birth weight
Maternal Age
Maternal Behavior
Noncommunicable diseases
Prenatal Care
Preterm birth
Preventive Health Services
Substance abuse
Suicide
Tobacco use
Abstract
In 1998, the Sustainable Development Working Group, a working group of the Arctic Council, established the Future of Children and Youth of the Arctic Initiative to improve the health and well-being of children and youth in the Arctic and to increase awareness and understanding of sustainable development. The initiative consists of two components: the Health Programme, which promotes the health and well-being of children and youth in the circumpolar Arctic; and the Networking Programme, which engages youth on issues of sustainable development, culture, and community.
Notes
ISBN: 0662406702
Documents

Analysis-of-Arctic-Children-and-Youth-Health-Indicators.pdf

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The International Polar Year 2007-2008; the Arctic human health legacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86925
Source
Alaska Med. 2007 Apr-Jun;49(2):43-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Parkinson, AJ
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 2007 Apr-Jun;49(2):43-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate
Cold Climate
Health promotion
Humans
International Cooperation
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
Life expectancy in Arctic populations has greatly improved over the last 50 years. Much of this improvement can be attributed to health research that has resulted in a reduction in morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, and the vaccine-preventable diseases of childhood. However, despite these improvements in health indicators of Arctic residents, life expectancy and infant mortality remain higher in indigenous Arctic residents in the US Arctic, northern Canada, and Greenland when compared to Arctic residents of Nordic countries. The International Polar Year (IPY) represents a unique opportunity to focus world attention on Arctic human health and to further stimulate Circumpolar cooperation on emerging Arctic human health concerns. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) is an Arctic Council IPY initiative that aims to build and expand on existing Arctic Council and International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) human health research activities. The human health legacy of the IPY will be increased visibility of the human health concerns of Arctic communities, revitalization of cooperative Arctic human health research focused on those concerns, the development of health policies based on research findings, and the subsequent implementation of appropriate interventions, prevention and control measures at the community level.
PubMed ID
18323371 View in PubMed
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Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report: Human Health Assessment 2017.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297303
Source
Government of Canada. CACAR IV. 128 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
CANADIAN ARCTIC CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT REPORT 2017 CACAR IV - Human Health Assessment — ii — CANADIAN ARCTIC CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT REPORT Human Health Assessment 2017 Lead Editor – Meredith S. Curren (Health Canada) Editorial Team - Meredith S. Curren (Health Canada), Shawn
  1 document  
Author
Curren, Meredith S.
Author Affiliation
Health Canada
Source
Government of Canada. CACAR IV. 128 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3003466
Keywords
Northern Canada
Contaminants
Traditional food
Health outcomes
Exposure
Biomonitoring
Management
Assessment
Notes
ISBN : 978-0-660-08172-4
Documents

CACAR-Human-Health-2017.pdf

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Report on goals and objectives for Arctic research, 2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100772
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
Infrastructure • Natural Resource Assessment and Earth Science • Indigenous Language, Identity, and Culture. These themes span a wide range of basic and applied research topics, from earth system science, to human health initiatives, to the social sciences, and to engineering and technology development. Arctic
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2710438
Keywords
Arctic human health
Arctic research
Civil infrastructure
Indigenous language, identity, and culture
Natural resource assessment and earth science
Abstract
This goals report coincides with the beginning of the first International Polar Year (IPY) in 50 years. From March 2007 to March 2009, the IPY will concentrate the efforts of scientists from over 60 nations to initiate, conduct and share the results of polar scientific research, and to create a legacy of human resources and infrastructure that will provide an enduring benefit to mankind.
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Evaluation of prenosologic states in man in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76748
Source
Pages 246-248 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
polarmen's health state, when planning measures for prevention of "circumpolar" pathology. Arctic Medical Research, vol. 47: suppl.1, pp 246-248, 1988.. One of the most actual and hotly discussed aspects of ''northern'' pathology is the question of initial cardio- vascular disturbances. The isolation
  1 document  
Author
Davidenko, V.I.
Author Affiliation
General and Clinical Pathology Department, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Siberian Division, USSR.
Source
Pages 246-248 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Climatic conditions
Initial cardiovascular pathology
Morbidity
Prenosologic states
Documents
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Human health implications of environmental contaminants in Arctic Canada: A review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4526
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Jun 1;230(1-3):1-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv Science of the Total Environmen Review Human health implications of environmental contaminants in Arctic Canada: A review J. Van Oostdam a,*, S.G. Donaldson a,b, M. Feeley c, D. Arnold c, P. Ayotte d, G. Bondy c, L. Chan e, É. Dewaily d, C.M. Furgal f, H
  1 document  
Author
Van Oostdam, J
Gilman, A
Dewailly, E
Usher, P
Wheatley, B
Kuhnlein, H
Neve, S
Walker, J
Tracy, B
Feeley, M
Jerome, V
Kwavnick, B
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Bureau of Chemical Hazards, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Jun 1;230(1-3):1-82
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
5360239
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Public Health
Risk factors
Abstract
This paper assesses the impact on human health of exposure to current levels of environmental contaminants in the Canadian Arctic, and identifies the data gaps that need to be filled by future human health research and monitoring. The concept of health in indigenous groups of the Arctic includes social, cultural, and spiritual dimensions. The harvesting, sharing and consumption of traditional foods are an integral component to good health among Aboriginal people influencing both physical health and social well-being. Traditional foods are also an economic necessity in many communities. Consequently, the contamination of country food raises problems which go far beyond the usual confines of public health and cannot be resolved by health advisories or food substitutions alone. The primary exposure pathway for the contaminants considered in this paper is through the traditional northern diet. For the Inuit, the OCs of primary concern at this time from the point of view of exposure are chlordane, toxaphene, and PCBs. Exposures are higher in the eastern than in the western region of the North. For Dene/Metis, exposure to OCs is in general below a level of concern. However, estimated intake of chlordane and toxaphene has been found to be elevated for certain groups and is a cause for concern if exposures are elevated on a regular basis. The developing foetus and breast-fed infant are likely to be more sensitive to the effects of OCs and metals than individual adults and are the age groups at greatest risk in the Arctic. Extensive sampling of human tissues in the Canadian north indicate that a significant proportion of Dene, Cree and Inuit had mean maternal hair mercury levels within the 5% risk-range proposed by the WHO for neonatal neurological damage. Based on current levels, lead does not appear to pose a health threat while cadmium is likely only a major risk factor for heavy smokers or consumers of large amounts of organ meats. Consumers of traditional foods are exposed to an approximately seven-fold higher radiation dose than non-consumers of traditional foods due predominantly to the bioaccumulation of natural radionuclides in the food chain. Risk determination for contaminants in country food involves a consideration of the type and amounts of food consumed and the sociocultural, nutritional, economic, and spiritual benefits associated with country foods. Risk management options that minimize the extent to which nutritional and sociocultural aspects of Aboriginal societies are compromised must always be considered.
PubMed ID
10466227 View in PubMed
Documents

1379222cd5e839e78d353c427ab62ff4f612.pdf

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Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report II: Toxic substances in the Arctic and Associated Effects - Human Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297304
Source
Government of Canada, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Northern Contaminants Program. 127 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
CANADIAN ARCTIC CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT REPORT II N O R T H E R N C O N T A M I N A N T S P R O G R A M C A N A D IA N A R C T IC C O N T A M IN A N T S A SSE SSM E N T R E P O R T II H U M A N H E A LT H HUMAN HEALTH Arctic Ocean Beaufort Sea Chukchi Sea
  1 document  
Author
Van Oostdam, J.
Donaldson, S.
Feeley, M.
Tremblay, N.
Source
Government of Canada, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Northern Contaminants Program. 127 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3994312
Keywords
Northern Canada
Humans
Contaminants
Exposure
Food
Health
Toxicology
Epidemiology
Biomarkers
Notes
ISBN 0-662-33469-8
Documents
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Arctic Social Indicators - A follow-up to the Arctic Human Development Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258225
Source
Nordic Council of Ministers. Copenhagen. 160 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
such, it constitutes a unique and indispensable resource. It addresses Arctic demography, political, economic and legal systems, and key issues in the North such as resource governance, community viability, human health and well-being, education, gender issues, and circumpolar international
  1 document  
Source
Nordic Council of Ministers. Copenhagen. 160 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9292823
Keywords
Humans
Arctic Regions
Health
Populations
Education
Cultural well-being and vitality
Nature
Notes
ISBN 978-92-893-2007-8
Documents

Arctic-Social-Indicators.pdf

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Residents' assessment of a community-based alcohol initiative in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6145
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995 Oct;54(4):184-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
M. Callaway
P. Suedfeld
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995 Oct;54(4):184-91
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Services
Consumer Participation
Female
Humans
Interviews
Inuits
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This paper evaluated a community-based initiative to control alcohol abuse in the Canadian Arctic by identifying, from an Inuit perspective, what components have been successful in the reduction of alcohol abuse and what components require improvement. Data were collected through interviews with community leaders, supplemented by a broadly-based survey. The most successful strategy in the reduction of alcohol abuse was the imposition of restrictions on the availability of alcohol. Counselling services did to some extent heighten community awareness about the deleterious effects of alcohol misuse, but have had marginal impact on the reduction of abuse. Residents and community leaders involved in running the alcohol program believe that a combination of the establishment of self-help groups, further counsellor training, increased community support, and improved outreach strategies would provide a greater impetus for change leading to the reduction of alcohol abuse within the community.
PubMed ID
8579667 View in PubMed
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The perceptions of first nation participants in a community oral health initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292489
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1364960
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Kavita R Mathu-Muju
James McLeod
Leeann Donnelly
Rosamund Harrison
Michael I MacEntee
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Dentistry , University of British Columbia , Vancouver , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1364960
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Workers - organization & administration
Cultural Competency
Dental Care - organization & administration
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Medicine, Traditional
Oral Health - ethnology
Perception
Abstract
The Children's Oral Health Initiative (COHI) is a federally funded community-based preventive dental program for children and their caregivers living in geographically isolated Canadian Aboriginal communities. The goal of the program is to improve access to preventive dental services for children of 0-7 years of age. It utilises community health workers in collaboration with dental therapists to promote and deliver the program. Almost half of the province of Manitoba's (n=27) First Nations communities have implemented COHI since 2005. The objective of this investigation was to explore the opinions of COHI from the perspective of community members whose children had participated in the program. Purposeful selection identified caregivers of enrolled children for a semi-structured interview. The targeted caregivers had children who met at least one of the following criteria: (1) 0-2 years old; (2) 5-7 years old; (3) had two or more children either currently or formerly enrolled in COHI. Six open-ended questions guided the interview process. Content analysis was used to code transcripts and identify themes. One hundred and forty-one interviews were completed in 13 communities. Participants defined good oral health as the absence of dental cavities, which reflects a Western biomedical model of disease. The local, community-based nature of COHI was viewed as essential to its success in increasing access to preventive dental services and improving children and caregivers' oral health knowledge and behaviours. In conclusion, a local, community-based oral health prevention programme is perceived as having a beneficial effect on children and caregivers' oral health knowledge and behaviours. However, oral health preventive messages need to be further integrated into traditional Aboriginal holistic models of wellness.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2016 Aug 15;107(2):e188-93 PMID 27526217
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8 PMID 15801551
Cites: Acad Pediatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;9(6):410-4 PMID 19945075
Cites: Aust Health Rev. 2015 Nov 10;:null PMID 26553422
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Dec;55(11):2017-31 PMID 12406468
Cites: Glob Qual Nurs Res. 2015 Aug 14;2:2333393615597674 PMID 28462313
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1279451 PMID 28151097
Cites: J Dent Res. 2009 Apr;88(4):361-6 PMID 19407158
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):95-7 PMID 18457280
Cites: J Dent Res. 2012 Nov;91(11):1032-7 PMID 22983408
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 1996;16:417-42 PMID 8839933
PubMed ID
28859556 View in PubMed
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AHDR (Arctic Human Development Report) 2004

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76417
Source
Akureyri: Stefansson Arctic Institute; 2004
Publication Type
Report
Date
2004
Printing Co., Reykjavik, Iceland Layout: Árni Pétursson Cover design: Guðjón Hafliðason ISBN: 9979-834-45-5 70 o 80 o 60 o Arctic Human Development Report 3 Chapter It gives me great pleasure to present the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR), initiated at the Foreign Ministers meeting in Inari
  1 document  
Source
Akureyri: Stefansson Arctic Institute; 2004
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
11103131
Keywords
Arctic demography
Circumpolar international relations and geopolitics
Human Development
Societies and cultures
Abstract
This report represents the first comprehensive attempt to document and compare systematically the welfare of Arctic residents on a circumpolar basis. Building on the pioneering work of the Arctic Council on environmental issues, it seeks to expand our horizons by spotlighting the social, economic and cultural aspects of the lives of the people in the region. In this way, the Arctic Human Development Report should mark a substantial contribution to the work of Arctic council in the area of sustainable development.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references.
Chapter 1: Introduction: Human Development in the Arctic by Oran R. Young and Níels Einarsson
Chapter 2: Arctic Demography by Dmitry Bogoyavlenskiy and Andy Siggner
Chapter 3: Societies and Cultures: Change and Persistence by Yvon Csonka and Peter Schweitzer
Chapter 4: Economic Systems by Gérard Duhaime
Chapter 5: Political Systems by Else Grete Broderstad and Jens Dahl
Chapter 6: Legal Systems by Nigel Bankes
Chapter 7: Resource Governance by Richard A. Caulfield
Chapter 8: Community Viability by Nils Aarsæther, Larissa Riabova and Jørgen Ole Bærenholdt
Chapter 9: Human Health and Well-being by Carl M. Hild and Vigdis Stordahl
Chapter 10: Education by Gunilla Johansson, Chris Paci and Sylvi Stenersen Hovdenak
Chapter 11: Gender Issues by Karla Jessen Williamson, Gunhild Hoogensen, Ann Therese Lotherington, Lawrence H. Hamilton, Sarah Savage, Natalia Koukarenko, Marina Kalinina, Ingunn Limstrand, Marit Stemland, Stephanie Irbacher Fox, Joanna Kafarowski, Lindis Sloan, and Mariekathrine Poppel
Chapter 12: Circumpolar International Relations and Geopolitics by Lassi Heininen
Chapter 13: A Human Development Agenda for the Arctic: Major Findings and Emerging Issues by Oran R. Young and Níels Einarsson
Documents

Arctic-Human-Development-Report-2004.pdf

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People and the Arctic: A prospectus for research on the human dimensions of the Arctic system (HARC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102063
Source
Report prepared for the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science Program
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-1997
, as well as with other arctic programs. The Human Dimensions of the Arctic System (HARC) initiative described in this prospectus will consider how humans interact with physical and biological environmental change in the Arctic (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 discusses existing and potential linkages between
  1 document  
Author
Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)
Source
Report prepared for the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science Program
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5880243
Keywords
Arctic
Global change
Humans
Local knowledge
Abstract
HARC research considers human activity, both within and outside the Arctic, as a link and vital driver among the terrestrial, marine, and climatic subsystems. Accordingly, the initiative provides a significant opportunity to integrate ecosystem and climate studies with a broad range of the social sciences. The major thrusts of the HARC initiative are to broaden our understanding of the arctic system and to assist arctic peoples to understand and respond to the effects of large-scale changes. HARC is also concerned with the effects of change in the arctic system on people who live outside the Arctic.
Documents

NSF_People-and-the-Arctic_A-Prospectus-for-Research-on-the-Human-Dimensions-of-the-Arctic-System-HARC_May-1997.pdf

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Scaling studies in Arctic system science and policy support: A call to research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100775
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jun-2010
.................................................................................. 44 4.1. Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 44 4.2. Arctic Human Health Research Issues in Alaska ..................................................................... 45 4.3. Climate
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3058527
Keywords
Arctic research
Ecosystems
Human systems
Physical systems
Scaling
Societal applications
Abstract
A goal of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission is to assistU.S. agencies in establishing a national Arctic researchprogram. In 2003, the Commission recognized the changesalready happening in the Arctic environment because ofclimate warming and the need to synthesize available information,regardless of the scale at which they were collected,to predict impacts on the whole Arctic. The first workshopsto discuss this required data synthesis were held in Seattlein 2003 and Woods Hole in 2004, and they brought togethersix experts in scaling up to the regional level through modelsof hydrology and of plant response to climate change. Thenext workshop, held in Seattle in 2008, included more than20 experts in Arctic environmental processes and scaling inthe fields of atmospheric modeling, ocean physics, biology,river hydrology, terrestrial ecology, and the interactions ofhuman populations with climate change. This report, organizedat the Seattle meeting, is not intended to be a comprehensivesynthesis of existing data and models but instead isa call for action to fill the gaps in the knowledge necessaryto reach the goal of developing an understanding of theeffects of climate and environmental changes at the scale ofthe whole Arctic environment including their atmospheric,marine, terrestrial, and human components.
Documents

79c655e74db118f43196a2b06976305ce5a4.pdf

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Arctic Human Development Report : regional processes and global linkages. (AHDR-II)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295208
Source
Norden, Nordic Council of Ministers. TemaNord 2014:567.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
Foreword It is with great pleasure that I present this second volume of the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR): Regional Processes and Global Linkages, initiated by the Stefansson Arctic Institute, Iceland, and pre- sented to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council for
  1 document  
Author
Larsen, Joan Nymand
Fondahl, Gail
Author Affiliation
(eds.)
Source
Norden, Nordic Council of Ministers. TemaNord 2014:567.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
13797930
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Populations
Migration
Culture
Identity
Economics
Governance
Legal systems
Resources usage
Climate change
Human health and well-being
Education
Globalization
Community viability and adaptation
Abstract
The goals of the second volume of the (AHDR-II) Arctic Human Development Report: Regional Processes and Global Linkages – are to provide an update to the first AHDR (2004) in terms of an assessment of the state of Arctic human development; to highlight the major trends and changes unfolding related to the various issues and thematic areas of human development in the Arctic over the past decade; and, based on this assessment, to identify policy relevant conclusions and key gaps in knowledge, new and emerging Arctic success stories, and important AHDR-II follow-up activities.
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Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy--Declaration and report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100823
Source
First Ministerial Conference on the Protection of the Arctic Environment, Rovaniemi, Finland, June 14, 1991
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jun-1991
Author
Arctic Council
Source
First Ministerial Conference on the Protection of the Arctic Environment, Rovaniemi, Finland, June 14, 1991
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acidification
Arctic ecosystems
Arctic environment
Arctic indigenous peoples
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP)
Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF)
Emergency prevention, preparedness, and response
Heavy metals
Natural resources
Noise
Oil pollution
Persistent organic contaminants
Radioactivity
Abstract
There is a growing national and international appreciation of the importance of Arctic ecosystems and an increasing knowledge of global pollution and resulting environmental threats. The Arctic is highly sensitive to pollution and much of its human population and culture is directly dependent on the health of the region'secosystems. Limited sunlight, ice cover that inhibits energy penetration, low mean and extreme temperatures, low species diversity and biological productivity and long-lived organisms with high lipid levels all contribute to the sensitivity of the Arctic ecosystem and cause it to be easily damaged. This vulnerability of the Arctic to pollution requires that action be taken now, or degradation may become irreversible. The governments of the Arctic countries have become increasingly aware of the need for, and their responsibility to combat these threats to the Arctic ecosystem. On the initiative of Finland, the eight Arcticcountries of USSR, USA, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Finland, Denmark and Canada have met to prepare a strategy to protect the Arctic environment.
Notes
Print copy available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100823.
Online copy available at the Arctic Council website.
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309 records – page 1 of 16.