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TIMP-1: is surrogate testing for extracellular matrix remodelling ready for clinical translation or only an Icelandic phenomenon?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300091
Source
Eur Heart J. 2017 12 07; 38(46):3431-3433
Publication Type
Editorial
Comment
Date
12-07-2017
Author
Evangelos Giannitsis
Hugo A Katus
Author Affiliation
Medizinische Klinik III, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2017 12 07; 38(46):3431-3433
Date
12-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Comment
Keywords
Biomarkers
Extracellular Matrix
Iceland
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1
Notes
CommentOn: Eur Heart J. 2017 Dec 7;38(46):3423-3430 PMID 29020384
PubMed ID
29194482 View in PubMed
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Food and nutrient intakes in young adults born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300092
Source
Pediatr Res. 2018 03; 83(3):589-596
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Hanna-Maria Matinolli
Satu Männistö
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Kati Heinonen
Johan G Eriksson
Dieter Wolke
Aulikki Lano
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Marja Vääräsmäki
Katri Räikkönen
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Res. 2018 03; 83(3):589-596
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Food
Food Preferences
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Nutrients
Patient compliance
Premature Birth
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
BackgroundAdults born preterm have higher levels of cardiometabolic risk factors than their term-born peers. Studies have suggested that at least those born smallest eat less healthily. We examined the association between early (
PubMed ID
29166380 View in PubMed
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Alternate approaches for assessing impacts of oil sands development on air quality: A case study using the First Nation Community of Fort McKay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300093
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2018 04; 68(4):308-328
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Carla Davidson
David Spink
Author Affiliation
a Endeavour Scientific , Calgary , Alberta , Canada.
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2018 04; 68(4):308-328
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Alberta
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Hydrocarbons - analysis
Indians, North American
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis
Oil and Gas Fields
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Abstract
Previous analyses of continuously measured compounds in Fort McKay, an indigenous community in the Athabasca Oil Sands, have detected increasing concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and total hydrocarbons (THC), but not of sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS), or particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter
PubMed ID
28945508 View in PubMed
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Outcomes of Prostate-specific Antigen-based Prostate Cancer Screening Among Men Using Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300094
Source
Eur Urol Focus. 2018 12; 4(6):851-857
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Teemu Johannes Murtola
Arla M Vettenranta
Kirsi Talala
Kimmo Taari
Ulf-Håkan Stenman
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: teemu.murtola@uta.fi.
Source
Eur Urol Focus. 2018 12; 4(6):851-857
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Early Detection of Cancer
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Kallikreins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
The Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (FinRSPC), the largest component of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), showed a smaller, nonsignificant reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality by systematic prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening compared with the overall ERSPC results. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce inflammation and also PSA elevations due to intraprostatic inflammation.
To explore whether NSAID usage modifies the effects of PSA-based screening on prostate cancer incidence and mortality.
A cohort of 78 165 men from the FinRSPC were linked to a comprehensive national prescription database to obtain information on NSAID reimbursements prior to screening.
Prostate cancer risk and mortality were compared between the FinRSPC screening arm and the control arm among NSAID users and nonusers using an age-adjusted Cox regression model.
Screening increased the detection of Gleason 6 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.47-1.72 and HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.26-1.54) and localized prostate tumors (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.18-1.32 and HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20) more among baseline NSAID nonusers than among users, respectively (p for interaction
PubMed ID
28753870 View in PubMed
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Cerebral hypoperfusion is not associated with an increase in amyloid ß pathology in middle-aged or elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300095
Source
Alzheimers Dement. 2018 01; 14(1):54-61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Oskar Hansson
Sebastian Palmqvist
Hanna Ljung
Tobias Cronberg
Danielle van Westen
Ruben Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Clinical Memory Research Unit, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Memory Clinic, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: Oskar.Hansson@med.lu.se.
Source
Alzheimers Dement. 2018 01; 14(1):54-61
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - metabolism - pathology
Amyloid beta-Peptides - metabolism
Aniline Compounds - pharmacokinetics
Benzothiazoles - pharmacokinetics
Brain - diagnostic imaging - drug effects
Carbolines - pharmacokinetics
Cerebrovascular Circulation - drug effects - physiology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Positron-Emission Tomography
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
It is hypothesized that cerebral hypoperfusion promotes the development of Alzheimer pathology. We therefore studied whether longstanding cerebral hypoperfusion is associated with Alzheimer pathology in nondemented humans.
Cerebral blood flow and amyloid ß (18F-Flutemetamol) positron emission tomography retention were assessed in eleven patients with unilateral occlusion of precerebral arteries resulting in chronic and uneven hypoperfusion. A subset of patients underwent tau (18F-AV-1451) positron emission tomography.
The blood flow was significantly reduced on the affected side of the brain in patients with unilateral occlusion of the internal carotid artery or stenosis of the middle cerebral artery. However, the cortical uptake of 18F-Flutemetamol or 18F-AV-1451 was not altered.
Our results suggest that longstanding cerebral hypoperfusion in humans does not result in accumulation of amyloid ß fibrils or tau aggregates.
PubMed ID
28719802 View in PubMed
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Dental care utilization in patients with different types of dementia: A longitudinal nationwide study of 58,037 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300096
Source
Alzheimers Dement. 2018 01; 14(1):10-19
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad
Sara Garcia-Ptacek
Dorota Religa
Jacob Holmer
Kåre Buhlin
Maria Eriksdotter
Gunilla Sandborgh-Englund
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: sm.fereshtehnejad@ki.se.
Source
Alzheimers Dement. 2018 01; 14(1):10-19
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Dental Care - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Neuropsychological Tests
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Dementia may be associated with discontinuation of regular dental checkups, which in turn results in poorer oral health.
We investigated the trend of change in dental care utilization and the number of teeth before and after being diagnosed with dementia. Longitudinal cognitive- and dental health-related information were merged using data on 58,037 newly diagnosed individuals from the Swedish Dementia Registry and Swedish Dental Health Register during 2007 to 2015.
Following dementia diagnosis, rate of dental care visits significantly declined. Individuals with mixed dementia, dementia with parkinsonism, and those with more severe and faster cognitive impairment had significantly higher rate of decline in dental care utilization. Vascular dementia and lower baseline Mini-Mental State Examination score were significant predictors of faster loss of teeth.
Dental care utilization markedly declines following dementia diagnosis. The reduction is more prominent in those with rapid progressive cognitive impairment and the ones with extra frailty burden.
PubMed ID
28692821 View in PubMed
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Pre-pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300097
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2017 09 01; 30(9):e7-e8
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
09-01-2017
Author
Eirin B Haug
Julie Horn
Abigail Fraser
Amanda R Markovitz
Janet W Rich-Edwards
George Davey Smith
Pål R Romundstad
Bjørn O Åsvold
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2017 09 01; 30(9):e7-e8
Date
09-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Notes
CommentOn: Am J Hypertens. 2017 Apr 1;30(4):382-388 PMID 28057630
CommentIn: Am J Hypertens. 2017 Sep 1;30(9):e9 PMID 28633294
PubMed ID
28633300 View in PubMed
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Response to Pre-Pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300098
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2017 09 01; 30(9):e9
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
09-01-2017
Author
Ravi Retnakaran
Shi Wu Wen
Hongzhuan Tan
Shujin Zhou
Chang Ye
Minxue Shen
Graeme N Smith
Mark C Walker
Author Affiliation
Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2017 09 01; 30(9):e9
Date
09-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Notes
CommentOn: Am J Hypertens. 2017 Apr 1;30(4):382-388 PMID 28057630
CommentOn: Am J Hypertens. 2017 Sep 1;30(9):e7-e8 PMID 28633300
PubMed ID
28633294 View in PubMed
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[Five Year Dynamics of Main Clinical Symptoms in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease in Russia in Comparison With Other Countries (the CLARIFY Registry)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300099
Source
Kardiologiia. 2017 Jan; (1):17-22
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Jan-2017
Author
S A Shalnova
R G Oganov On Behalf Of The Participants Registry Clarify
Author Affiliation
National Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2017 Jan; (1):17-22
Date
Jan-2017
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Coronary Artery Disease
Europe
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia
Prospective Studies
Registries
Russia
Abstract
The CLARIFY register (The prospeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease) combined data of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) from 45 countries including Russia. Purpose of this publication was to analyze dynamics of stable angina during 5 years of follow up in the Russian CLARIFY cohort compared with cohorts of patients from European and non-European countries.
Number of patients recruited in Russia was 2249.
During 5 years of observation proportion of angina decreased by 65.5, 39.5 and 37.0% in Russia, European and non-European countries, respectively. Proportion of patients with heart rate (HR)
PubMed ID
28290829 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the Possibility of Comparing Mortality Rates from Diseases of the Circulatory System in the United States and Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300100
Source
Kardiologiia. 2017 Jan; (1):5-16
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
S A Boytsov
E M Andreev
I V Samorodskaya
Author Affiliation
National Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2017 Jan; (1):5-16
Date
Jan-2017
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular diseases
Cardiovascular System
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Russia
United States
Abstract
to compare and discuss causes of differences between standardized mortality rates (SMR) from diseases of the circulatory system (DCS) among men and women older than 50 years in Russia and USA.
Data on mortality rate in the USA were taken from WHO mortality database (WHO MD), those on the USA population by 5-years age bands from Human Mortality Database (HMD). Information on mortality rates in Russia was obtained from Rosstat. In analysis we used age-adjusted death rates and SMR for DCS or ages more or equal 50 years. For standardization of mortality rates we used data of the European Standard Population 2013.
By 23 3-digit codes mortality rates among men in USA were higher than in Russia (in the structure of mortality among women there were 28 such codes). Portion of such deaths in Russia in total number of DCS deaths was 6.5% both for men and women, while figures for USA were 36.8 and 40%, respectively. About 99% of differences in SMR from DCS between countries were determined by 8 and 6 groups of causes in men and women, respectively. Analysis of 4-digit ICD codes showed that almost 40% of DSC class deaths both in Russia and USA had the forth digit of ICD-10 code 8 or 9 and were accompanied by wording "other" or "unspecified" or formulation of diseases which were not used in clinical practice and were absent in both guidelines issued by Russian or American professional societies. Despite existence of ICD rules the conducted analysis allows to state that those rules could be interpreted differently in various countries. This resulted in obtaining noncomparable data.
Comparison of mortality rates in USA and Russia based on existing ICD coding rules cannot be correctly performed. Therefore, this comparison does not allow to assess contribution of financing and organization of medical service in differences in mortality rates between two countries.
PubMed ID
28290828 View in PubMed
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Preterm Children Have Higher Risk Than Full-term Children of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease During the First 2 Years of Life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300080
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 07; 37(7):e195-e200
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-2018
Author
Øystein Rolandsen Riise
Ida Laake
Didrik Vestrheim
Brita Askeland Winje
Dag Moster
Jann Storsæter
Author Affiliation
From the Departments of Vaccine Preventable Diseases.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 07; 37(7):e195-e200
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Female
Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine - administration & dosage
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Registries
Risk factors
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Term Birth
Vaccination
Abstract
A few previous studies have reported an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children born preterm, but this has not been investigated in a cohort study. The impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on IPD incidence rates in preterm children is unknown.
Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (2002-2010) were linked to other national registries. In total, 628,138 children were included in our study and followed until 2 years of age. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with Poisson regression.
We identified 411 cases of IPD. We observed higher rates of IPD in preterm than in full-term children for the intervals 0-23, 0-5 and 6-23 months of age, IRRs = 1.83 (95 % CI: 1.36-2.47), 2.95 (95% CI: 1.44-6.06) and 1.69 (95% CI: 1.22-2.34), respectively. The risk for IPD was reduced in the PCV7-period (2007-2010) compared with that of the pre PCV7-period (2002-2005) for children 6-23 months of age, IRRs = 0.20 (95% CI: 0.08-0.53) for preterm children and 0.28 (95% CI: 0.21-0.38) for full-term children, but not for those 0-5 months of age, IRRs = 1.94 (95% CI: 0.48-7.80) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.38-1.33).
Preterm children had an increased risk of IPD. After introduction of PCV7, the rate of IPD was reduced among preterm and full-term children from 6 months of age.
PubMed ID
29570592 View in PubMed
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Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detector for the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300081
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7305-7314
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Anna Andersson
Muhammad Jamshaid Ashiq
Mohammad Shoeb
Susanne Karlsson
David Bastviken
Henrik Kylin
Author Affiliation
Department of Thematic Studies-Environmental Change, Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7305-7314
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Disinfectants - analysis
Disinfection - methods
Drinking Water - chemistry
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Halogenation
Halogens - analysis
Humans
Sweden
Trihalomethanes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - methods
Water supply
Abstract
The occurrence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has become an issue of concern during the past decades. The DBPs pose health risks and are suspected to cause various cancer forms, be genotoxic, and have negative developmental effects. The vast chemical diversity of DBPs makes comprehensive monitoring challenging. Only few of the DBPs are regulated and included in analytical protocols. In this study, a method for simultaneous measurement of 20 DBPs from five different structural classes (both regulated and non-regulated) was investigated and further developed for 11 DBPs using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled with a halogen-specific detector (XSD). The XSD was highly selective towards halogenated DBPs, providing chromatograms with little noise. The method allowed detection down to 0.05 µg L-1 and showed promising results for the simultaneous determination of a range of neutral DBP classes. Compounds from two classes of emerging DBPs, more cytotoxic than the "traditional" regulated DBPs, were successfully determined using this method. However, haloacetic acids (HAAs) should be analyzed separately as some HAA methyl esters may degrade giving false positives of trihalomethanes (THMs). The method was tested on real water samples from two municipal waterworks where the target DBP concentrations were found below the regulatory limits of Sweden.
PubMed ID
29492811 View in PubMed
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Validity of the Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300082
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2018 07 01; 27(1):67-74
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-01-2018
Author
Per Vikholm
Torbjörn Ivert
Johan Nilsson
Anders Holmgren
Wolfgang Freter
Lisa Ternström
Haider Ghaidan
Ulrik Sartipy
Christian Olsson
Hans Granfeldt
Sigurdur Ragnarsson
Örjan Friberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2018 07 01; 27(1):67-74
Date
07-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Data Accuracy
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
Our goal was to validate the Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry by reviewing the reported cardiac operations to assess the completeness and quality of the registered data and the EuroSCORE II variables.
A total of 5837 cardiac operations were reported to the Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry in Sweden during 2015. A randomly selected sample of 753 patient records (13%) was scrutinized by 3 surgeons at all 8 units in Sweden performing open cardiac surgery in adults.
Coverage was excellent with 99% [95% confidence interval (CI) 98-99%] of the performed procedures found in the registry. Reported waiting times for surgery were correct in 78% (95% CI 76-79%) of the cases. The main procedural code was correctly reported in 96% (95% CI 95-97%) of the cases. The correlation between reported and monitored logistic EuroSCORE II had a coefficient of 0.79 (95% CI 0.76-0.82), and the median difference in EuroSCORE II was 0% (interquartile range -0.4% to 0.4%). The majority of EuroSCORE II variables had good agreement and coherence; however, New York Heart Association functional class, preoperative renal dysfunction, left ventricular ejection fraction, Canadian Cardiovascular Society Class IV angina and poor mobility were less robust. Postoperative complications were rare and in general had a high degree of completeness and agreement.
The reliability of the variables in the national Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry was excellent. Thus, the registry is a valuable source of data for quality studies and research. Some EuroSCORE II variables require improved and stricter definitions to obtain uniform reporting and high validity.
PubMed ID
29452368 View in PubMed
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Symptoms, Signs and Long-term Prognosis of Vertically Transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis Infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300083
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 09; 37(9):930-933
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Minna Honkila
Marjo Renko
Tytti Pokka
Erika Wikström
Matti Uhari
Terhi Tapiainen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Children and Adolescents, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 09; 37(9):930-933
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Conjunctivitis, Inclusion - diagnosis - microbiology
Delayed Diagnosis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Male
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Registries
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - microbiology
Abstract
Although Chlamydia trachomatis infection is common in pregnant women, such infections are rarely encountered in infants. To clarify the recognition of C. trachomatis infections in infants, we analyzed symptoms and signs of perinatally acquired chlamydial infection, together with its long-term prognosis in a large population-based patient series.
A search through 2 national health registries covering 1996-2011, a cohort of 933,823 births, yielded 124 children with a microbiologically confirmed C. trachomatis infection. We then reviewed copies of the children's medical records up to 16 years of age.
One-third of the infants with chlamydial conjunctivitis (33/110) had spontaneous blood-stained discharge from the infected eye. The infants with C. trachomatis lower respiratory tract infection were mostly afebrile (30/32), and 15/32 of them had wheezing. Staccato cough was not recorded in any of the infants. The median diagnostic delay from the onset of the symptoms was 13 (range 4-374) days for conjunctivitis and 25 (range 10-149) days for lower respiratory tract infection. One neglected child developed bilateral corneal scars because of an untreated C. trachomatis infection.
Blood-stained discharge was a typical finding in C. trachomatis conjunctivitis. The C. trachomatis-infected infants had severe and prolonged symptoms, but long-term consequences were rare. The diagnostic delay was long, especially among the infants with a C. trachomatis lower respiratory tract infection.
Notes
CommentIn: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 Aug;37(8):835 PMID 30001294
CommentIn: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 Aug;37(8):835-836 PMID 30001295
PubMed ID
29389825 View in PubMed
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Cost-utility of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300084
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2018 05; 53(5):657-660
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018

Reconstructing an African haploid genome from the 18th century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300085
Source
Nat Genet. 2018 02; 50(2):199-205
Publication Type
Biography
Case Reports
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Anuradha Jagadeesan
Ellen D Gunnarsdóttir
S Sunna Ebenesersdóttir
Valdis B Guðmundsdóttir
Elisabet Linda Thordardottir
Margrét S Einarsdóttir
Hákon Jónsson
Jean-Michel Dugoujon
Cesar Fortes-Lima
Florence Migot-Nabias
Achille Massougbodji
Gil Bellis
Luisa Pereira
Gísli Másson
Augustine Kong
Kári Stefánsson
Agnar Helgason
Author Affiliation
deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nat Genet. 2018 02; 50(2):199-205
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Biography
Case Reports
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Enslaved Persons
Family Characteristics - history
Genome, Human
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Haploidy
History, 18th Century
Humans
Iceland
Male
Pedigree
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Transients and Migrants
West Indies
Abstract
A genome is a mosaic of chromosome fragments from ancestors who existed some arbitrary number of generations earlier. Here, we reconstruct the genome of Hans Jonatan (HJ), born in the Caribbean in 1784 to an enslaved African mother and European father. HJ migrated to Iceland in 1802, married and had two children. We genotyped 182 of his 788 descendants using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips and whole-genome sequenced (WGS) 20 of them. Using these data, we reconstructed 38% of HJ's maternal genome and inferred that his mother was from the region spanned by Benin, Nigeria and Cameroon.
PubMed ID
29335549 View in PubMed
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Relapse Among Infants Hospitalized for Bronchiolitis in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300086
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 07; 37(7):e203-e205
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Laura Toivonen
Kohei Hasegawa
Janice A Espinola
Carlos A Camargo
Tuomas Jartti
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 07; 37(7):e203-e205
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
In a prospective cohort of children hospitalized for bronchiolitis, we examined the rate of and characteristics associated with bronchiolitis relapse. Bronchiolitis relapse was documented in 22 (6%) of 391 children, and median time to relapse was 2 (interquartile range, 1-7) days. Relapse occurred more often in males. Prenatal smoking and smoke exposure in the home were also associated with relapse.
PubMed ID
29315157 View in PubMed
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Loss-of-function variants in ADCY3 increase risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300087
Source
Nat Genet. 2018 02; 50(2):172-174
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Niels Grarup
Ida Moltke
Mette K Andersen
Maria Dalby
Kristoffer Vitting-Seerup
Timo Kern
Yuvaraj Mahendran
Emil Jørsboe
Christina V L Larsen
Inger K Dahl-Petersen
Arthur Gilly
Daniel Suveges
George Dedoussis
Eleftheria Zeggini
Oluf Pedersen
Robin Andersson
Peter Bjerregaard
Marit E Jørgensen
Anders Albrechtsen
Torben Hansen
Author Affiliation
Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Nat Genet. 2018 02; 50(2):172-174
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adenylyl Cyclases - genetics
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Loss of Function Mutation
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We have identified a variant in ADCY3 (encoding adenylate cyclase 3) associated with markedly increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the Greenlandic population. The variant disrupts a splice acceptor site, and carriers have decreased ADCY3 RNA expression. Additionally, we observe an enrichment of rare ADCY3 loss-of-function variants among individuals with type 2 diabetes in trans-ancestry cohorts. These findings provide new information on disease etiology relevant for future treatment strategies.
Notes
CommentIn: Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Jun;29(6):361-363 PMID 29454745
PubMed ID
29311636 View in PubMed
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Current smoking is associated with a larger waist circumference and a more androgenic profile in young healthy women from high-risk breast cancer families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300088
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2018 02; 29(2):243-251
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-2018
Author
Carolina Ellberg
Håkan Olsson
Helena Jernström
Author Affiliation
Division of Oncology and Pathology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. carolina.ellberg@med.lu.se.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2018 02; 29(2):243-251
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Androgens - blood
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Estradiol - blood
Female
Humans
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Smokers
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden
Testosterone - blood
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose was to elucidate the interplay between current smoking, anthropometric measurements, and endogenous hormone levels in women?=?40 years. Questionnaires on lifestyle and reproductive factors were completed by 269 healthy women from high-risk breast cancer families between 1996 and 2006 in Sweden. Blood samples for analyses of plasma testosterone, estradiol, androstenedione, sex hormone-binding globulin, and body measurements were obtained 5-10 days before predicted onset of the next menstrual period. Women without smoking status, who were currently breastfeeding, or using hormonal contraception other than combined oral contraceptives (OCs) were excluded (n?=?27). Current smokers (n?=?57) had larger waist circumference (adjp?=?0.004) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (adjp?=?0.007) than non-smokers (n?=?185). In non-OC users, adjusted mean androstenedione levels were higher in current smokers compared with non-smokers (10.3 vs. 8.6 nmol/L; adjp?=?0.0002). While in current OC users estradiol levels were higher in smokers compared with non-smokers (22.5 vs. 17.4 pg/mL; adjp?=?0.012). In multivariable models, WHR was associated with both current smoking (adjp?=?0.016) and higher levels of androstenedione (adjp?=?0.05) or bioavailable testosterone (adjp?=?0.001). Among non-OC users, a more androgenic profile was observed in current smokers compared with non-smokers, but not in current OC users. Irrespective of OC use, current smoking was associated with increased waist circumference.
PubMed ID
29299723 View in PubMed
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Procedural complications of endovascular treatment in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage treated at a single centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300089
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2018 03; 160(3):551-557
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
03-2018
Author
Mikko Alanen
Liisa Pyysalo
Iiro Jalava
Oona Snicker
Juha-Pekka Pienimäki
Juha Öhman
Antti Ronkainen
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. alanen.mikko.a@student.uta.fi.
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2018 03; 160(3):551-557
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneurysm, Ruptured - surgery
Brain Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Embolization, Therapeutic
Endovascular Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intracranial Hemorrhages - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - mortality - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
We present a single-centre experience of procedural complications suffered by patients undergoing endovascular treatment for a ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm at Tampere University Hospital, Finland, between 2000 and 2014.
From 2000 to 2014, we treated 1,253 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, 491 of whom received endovascular treatment. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the hospital's aneurysm database. A procedural complication was defined as having occurred whenever there was a documented new event in the patient's medical records or a note of a technical complication written by an interventionist after endovascular treatment. Procedural complications could be with or without clinical symptoms.
Nearly 40% (491/1253) of the patients were treated with the endovascular method. Procedural complications occurred in 11.4% (56/491) of cases. The morbidity rate was 4.5% (22/491) and the mortality rate was 0.2% (1/491). Of the 56 complications, ischaemic complications occurred in 52% (29/56), haemorrhagic complications occurred in 27% (15/56) and technical complications occurred in 21% (12/56) of cases. In 61% (34/56) of the cases, the procedural complication did not cause any clinical symptoms.
The total risk for procedural complications leading to postoperative disability or death at our institute was 4.7%. The complication frequency is in accordance with previous reports. Endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms is a safe treatment method when patient selection is carefully performed.
PubMed ID
29288393 View in PubMed
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