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Temperature effects on magnesium metabolism in vivo and in vitro.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298690
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-41 24 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1963
  1 document  
Author
Rogers, T.A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Stanford University, California
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-41 24 p.
Date
June 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1445222
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Amphibians
Hypothermia
Body temperature
Magnesium
Metabolism
Radioactive isotopes
Abstract
The exchange rates of radioactive magnesium in various tissues of the rat were compared in normal and hypothermic animals ( 20° C}. The temperature effect was similar to that measured in isolated rat muscles incubated at 37° and 20° C, and the Q10 was 1. 7 in each case. Frog muscles were incubated at various temperatures, and the Q10 of Mg28 influx was calculated to be 1. 8; the Q10 of the concurrent efflux was 1. 2. These data suggest that the magnesium concentration in the cells is maintained by an active transport mechanism, and that the rise in serum magnesium in hypothermia is in part due to inhibition of this transport mechanism. The exchange rates of radioactive magnesium are less in the tissues of cold adapted rats than in normal controls, and the difference applies principally to the more rapid components of the exchange. Magnesium uptake by the rat liver is increased by administration of glucose and insulin, but this is evidently not a stoichiometric relationship between liver magnesium and liver glycogen.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-41
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Thermal and metabolic response of the Kalahari Bushmen to moderate cold exposure at night.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298692
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-44. 29 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1963
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Hildes, J.A.
Jackson, D.C.
Andersen, H.T.
Author Affiliation
John B. Pierce Laboratory, New Haven, Conn.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-44. 29 p.
Date
September 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2107544
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Men
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temparature
Heat production (biology)
Shivering
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-44
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Deep hypothermia in the rat: studies on survival and tolerance to circulatory arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298691
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-43. 12 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
February 1963
  1 document  
Author
Lesage, M.A.
Sealy, W.C.
Young, W.G., Jr.
Author Affiliation
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke University medical Center, Durham, N.C.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-43. 12 p.
Date
February 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1095393
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Hypothermia
Blood Circulation
Pathology
Arrhythmia
Cardiovascular System
Abstract
A study was carried out to establish whether or not rats could be regularly carried to deep hypothermia and then rewarmed without an excessively high mortality rate. A technique for inducing deep hypothermia is described. Rats were cooled to deep hypothermia and revived in a high enough percentage to permit quantitative estimates of other experimental situations. Hypoxia during cooling and warming is apparently important in the improvement of mortality figures. Circulatory arrest of 60 minutes or less is well tolerated during deep hypothermia.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.
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Physical insulation of Korean diving women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298680
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-22. 19 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1962
  1 document  
Author
Rennie, D.W.
Covino, B.G.
Howell, B.J.
Song, S.H.
Kong, B.S.
Hong, S.K.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-22. 19 p.
Date
July 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4113878
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Women
Korea
Body fats
Diving
Cold water
Exposure
Temperature perception
Abstract
Human cold adaptation was studied by comparing maximal body insulations (I values) of Korean diving women, non-diving women and men,, and of American men and women. The diving women had significantly larger I values than Korean men, due to thicker subcutaneous fat. There was no difference in I value or subcutaneous fat thickness between the diving women and the non-diving women. The Koreans had 30 per cent higher I values than Americans of comparable subcutaneous fat thickness, signifying greater vasoconstriction and a thicker shell of non-perfused tissue. The "critical water temperature" at which shivering occurred was 30° C or lower for the diving women. For other subjects of comparable fat thickness it was 31° to 34° C. This elevated shivering threshold of the diving women was the only evidence of acquired cold adaptation. The thicker subcutaneous fat of women offers more protection to cold and may be the reason why women and not men engage in diving.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-22
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Rate of red cell formation in rats at 24° C and at 5° C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298679
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-20. 9 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1962
  1 document  
Author
Everett, N.B.
Caffrey, R.W.
Author Affiliation
University of Washington, Seattle
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-20. 9 p.
Date
July 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1099910
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Erythrocytes
Abstract
Radioautography of peripheral blood subsequent to Fe59 administration was employed to determine the rate of erythrocyte formation in male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained at 24° C and after exposure to 5° C for 4, 5, and 6 weeks. The rate at which newly-formed labeled cells appeared in the blood was approximately 3 per cent per day of the total circulating erythrocyte population for both control and experimental animals. This rate was the same for animals of two body weight ranges, 150 to 200 grams and 300 to 400 grams. Assuming that the rate of new red cell formation is equal to the rate of red cell destruction, the circulating life span of the rat erythrocytes is estimated to be approximately 33 days.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-20
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The effect of induced hypoxia on thermoregulation and cardiopulmonary function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298678
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-19. 46 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
  1 document  
Author
Lim, T.P.K.
Luft, U.C.
Author Affiliation
Lovelace Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-19. 46 p.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3484881
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Dogs
Cold Temperature
Hypoxia
Heat production (biology)
Shivering
Exposure
Heart
Lungs
Abstract
The effect of induced hypoxia on body temperature regulation and cardiopulmonary function is assessed in anesthetized dogs under warm, neutral and cold environments. Hypoxia acts differently to heat conservation (shivering) and heat dissipation (thermal panting) mechanisms: the former is suppressed, while the latter is facilitated. It is also found that the suppression of shivering is partly due to the hypocapnia which is produced under hypoxia. The lethal threshold of acutely induced hypoxia is at the inspiratory O2 level of approximately 3 per cent in the neutral and cold environments, whereas it is at 5 per cent in the warm environment. Under hypoxia, the total ventilation is increased two- to threefold. The alveolar ventilation, however, is augmented to a lesser degree with a progressive increase in physiological dead space. Contrary to respiration, the cardiac output is only slightly increased (less than 30 per cent over the control value) under hypoxia.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-19
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Effects of septal and hypothalamic lesions on shivering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298677
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-18 14 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Kawamura, Y
Hemingway, A.
Price, W.M.
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-18 14 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1735813
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Hypothalmus
Abstract
Shivering and heat loss in the cold were determined in 46 cats several weeks or months after bilateral destruction of various septal and hypothalamic regions. Septal lesions had no effect on either parameter. The tremor was abolished or markedly reduced in cats with lesions in the dorsomedial region of the posterior hypothalamus, but postural, pilomotor and behavioral responses to cooling persisted. Lesions of the dorsolateral region of the posterior hypothalamus increased heat loss despite the presence of shivering, huddling and piloerection. These results confirmed our previous electrical stimulation data that the primary region controlling the efferent (motor) aspect of shivering is the dorsomedial region of the posterior hypothalamus and additionally indirectly suggested that the dorsolateral region of the posterior hypothalamus is implicated in cold-induced cutaneous vasoconstriction.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-18
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Effects of cold acclimatization on liver di- and triphosphopyridine nucleotide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298689
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-40. 7 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
  1 document  
Author
Hannon, John P.
Rosenthal, Arthur
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-40. 7 p.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1049777
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Liver
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Nucleotides
Enzymes
Abstract
The levels of oxidized and reduced di- and triphosphopyridine nucleotide were measured in liver tissue from rats that had been exposed to cold (4° ± 1° C) for one month. These animals exhibited about 65% more TPNH and total triphosphopyridine nucleotide than control animals maintained at an ambient temperature of 25° ± 1° C. The significance of these alterations to the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation is discussed.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-40
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Color removal from surface waters by carbon filter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298688
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-37. 5 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1963
  1 document  
Author
Baumgartner, D.J.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center, U. S. Public Health Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare , Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-37. 5 p.
Date
October 1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
593895
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Surface water
Carbon filter
Abstract
A small carbon filter was investigated to determine the effectiveness of removing color from surface waters at remote Air Force radar sites in Alaska. The raw water was characterized by color ranging from 50 to 90 units, pH near 6, temperature 5° Celsius, and low turbidity. When using carbon with a particle size high enough to provide low pressure losses, the color removed was less than 50 per cent. With powdered activated carbon, pressure losses and carbon carryover caused the system to be considered unacceptable even though color removal was high.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-37
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Solar illuminated photosynthetic gas exchangers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298687
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-36. 30 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Gafford, R.B.
Fulton, J.D.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-36. 30 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5207285
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Solar Energy
Algae
Closed-cycle ecological systems
Space environmental conditions
Photosynthesis
Arctic Regions
Abstract
During recent years much effort has been expended in attempting to develop principles, techniques, and instrumentation leading to the ultimate goal of utilizing photosynthetic organisms for the support of man in an extraterrestrial environment. This study was designed to determine if solar illuminated photosynthetic gas exchange systems would be feasible, and to provide sufficient data to determine if further consideration of this approach would be warranted.
Comparative growth and photosynthetic data of two species of algae under various conditions are presented. Chlorella pyrenoidosa, strain TX 71105, and the 52° C strain of Synechococcus lividus were cultured in thin films in hemispherical domes and solar oriented flat panels during the long Alaskan days of June and July 1961. Growth and photosynthetic rates were measured in cultures having film depths of 1, 2 and 4 cm under solar illumination. The maximum production rate observed in the flat panels was over 50 grams of algae and approximately I00 liters (STP) of oxygen per square meter of illuminated surface per day. Based on the observed data, it is estimated that the illuminated area of algal suspension required for a one man gas exchanger will be six square meters or less. The maximum volume of the illuminator will be 60 liters. A small additional volume must be added for pumping and for gas exchange.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-36
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Military small group performance under isolation and stress; critical review. V. Psychological principles of management and leadership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298686
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-35. 43 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Sells, S.B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-35. 43 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3272966
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Military psychology
Behavioral health
Stress
Isolation
Leadership
Group dynamics
Abstract
This presents a critical discussion and interpretation of principles of leadership and management with particular reference to the problems of AC&W sites in Alaska. It is based on a review of scientific research in the fields of psychology, sociology and management science, primarily. The major topics covered include relations of management and leadership, group-centered vs. production- centered management, organizational relations, .organizational control, and leadership in formal organizations: Selected references are cited and reference is made to an annotated bibliography containing abstracts of significant studies: AAL Reports 61-18 to 61-24, incl.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-35
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Military small group performance under isolation and stress: critical review. IV. Selection, indoctrination, and training for Arctic remote duty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298685
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-34. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Sells, S.B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-34. 26 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2361042
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Arctic Regions
Cold Temperature
Military psychology
Stress
Behavioral health
Abstract
This review is part of a bibliographic study of research on factors related to the effectiveness of Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) sites in Alaska. The literature surveyed has previously been summarized in a series of annotated bibliographies (Reports AAL TR 61-19 to 61-24). The critical reviews based on this literature have been prepared as a series of five reports, covering the following topics: I. Informal, Natural Groups: Development, Structure, and Function; II. Dimensions of Group Structure and Group Behavior; III. Environmental Stress and Behavior Ecology; IV. Organizational Staffing; and V. Psychological Principles of Management and Leadership. The assistance of Mr. George Haven is acknowledged in the preparation of these reviews.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-34
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Military small group performance under isolation and stress: critical review. III. Environmental stress and behavior ecology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298684
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-33. 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Braun, J.R.
Sells, S.B.
Author Affiliation
Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-33. 23 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1414060
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Isolation
Cold Temperature
Behavioral health
Military psychology
Stress
Abstract
A critical research review of behavioral effects of isolation, cold, and general stress, with particular reference to AC& W sites in Alaska. On the basis of the literature, environmental stress does not appear as a major threat to adjustment of troops stationed at AC& W sites. Human engineering has contributed greatly to the comfortization and control of the environment, and there appears to be a wide difference between conditions of the area and conditions of the specific work and living environment, except in cases of emergency. The possibility of such emergencies may be a threat, but few have occurred. The positive values of motivation, training 1 and group dynamics (including leadership) as factors which offset the disorganizing effects of environmental stress are pointed out.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-33
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Experimental studies on profound hypothermia induced and reverted with a pump oxygenator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298683
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-30. 24 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
February 1963
  1 document  
Author
Lesage, M.A.
Sealy, W.C.
Young, W.G., Jr.
Lee, J.M.
Author Affiliation
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-30. 24 p.
Date
February 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1829070
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Hypothermia
Metabolism
Oxygen
Blood
Abstract
This report covers a summary of 300 animal experiments during profound hypothermia which stresses (1) the acceptable animal survival rate, (2) the favorable metabolic state afforded by this technique and (3) the protective action of profound hypothermia against even severe oxygen deprivation. The technique of profound hypothermia induced and controlled with a pump oxygenator has been shown to be feasible by these studies and has now been widely accepted for clinical application. It has become increasingly evident that, though long periods of circulatory arrest can be achieved, flow of oxygenated blood ought not to be stopped unless the operation demands it. The basis for this statement rests upon the observations that oxygen is utilized during profound hypothermia. There are few cardiac operations where prolonged circulatory arrest is ever needed.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-30
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Arctic survival rations. IX. Effect of a high fat diet on thiamine excretion and plasma cholesterol in human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298682
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-28. 7 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1962
  1 document  
Author
Vaughan, D.A.
Vaughan, L.N.
Evonuk, E.
Klain, G.J.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-28. 7 p.
Date
July 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1018480
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Diet
Fats
Thiamine
Cholesterol
Survival
Arctic Regions
Military rations
Abstract
Human subjects were used to test the effects of two simple diets of varying fat content on thiamine excretion. plasma cholesterol, ketone excretion and the oxygen cost of exercise. After subsistence on the high fat diet (60% of Calories) for two weeks, the subjects basal excretion of thiamine and their load dose returns of urinary thiamine were significantly less than on the low fat diet (18% of Calories). This was considered to be evidence that a high fat diet ha.s a sparing effect on the thiamine requirement of humans.
In the 2-week period plasma cholesterol levels were significantly increased by subsistence on the low fat diet; no change was observed when the subjects ate the high fat diet. These effects were attributed to the predominately saturated nature of the fat in the low-fat diet, in contrast to the high fat diet in which 69% of the fat was unsaturated corn oil. No changes were observed in ketone excretion or in the oxygen cost of exercise during these experimental periods.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-28
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Effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline on the ear vessel in cold- and warm- adapted rabbits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298681
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-23. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1962
  1 document  
Author
Honda, N.
Judy, W.V.
Carlson, L.D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-23. 16 p.
Date
October 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1512644
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rabbits
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Adrenaline
Noradrenaline
Acclimatized
Abstract
Cold exposure increases the secretion of catechol amines and enhances the effect of these hormones on metabolism. Whether the sensitivity of peripheral vessels to epinephrine and norepinephrine is altered by cold exposure has not been reported. Warm- adapted (27° ± 1° C) and cold-adapted (5° ± 1 ° C) rabbits were studied under chloralose and urethane anesthesia. Epinephrine and norepinephrine were infused (3 gamma/kg/min) through an ear vein. Rectal plus ear temperature, EKG, blood flow and venous pressure in the ear were measured. Compliance of veins was calculated from the ?V / ?P at pressures between 20 and 30 mm Hg.
After prolonged cold exposure rabbits responded to catechol amine infusion (adrenaline and noradrenaline) with less change in heart rate during infusion and a more rapid return to control levels following infusion; with less decrease in ear temperature during infusion and a more rapid return to control levels following infusion; less increase in peripheral resistance, and less effect on compliance of the capacitance vessels (veins).
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-23
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Effect of exposure to low temperature on development of Spirochaete pallida in the rabbit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298658
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-43. 5 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
  1 document  
Author
Marcus, Stanley
Miya, Fred
Phelps, LeGrand J.
Spencer, LaVal
Author Affiliation
College of Medicine, University of Utah
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-43. 5 p.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
329758
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Cold Temperature
Spirochaete pallida
Abstract
Adult male albino rabbits challenged intratesticularly with viable Spirochaete pallida suspension and kept at 3° C .or 21° C developed syphilomata at the same rates. Adverse environmental temperatures apparently do not enhance or decrease the rabbit's resistance to the challenge. Rectal temperature measurements during the experimental period show no gross differences in animals kept at 3° C or 21° C, and the temperatures remained quite constant throughout the experiment.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-43
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Effect of acute and chronic low temperature stress on survival of mice challenged with Staphylococcus aureus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298657
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-42. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
  1 document  
Author
Marcus, Stanley
Miya, Fred
Phelps, LeGrand J.
Spencer, LaVal
Author Affiliation
College of Medicine, University of Utah
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-42. 10 p.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
639021
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Cold Temperature
Staphylococcus aureus
Abstract
Normal and immunized mice were subjected to acute and chronic stress of 2° C ambient temperature. The mice were challenged with varying doses of Staphylococcus aureus, strain Fritchie. Immunization offered significant protection to mice kept at 21° C and to mice that were immunized, challenged and acutely exposed to 2° C in groups. No protection was observed in mice that were immunized, challenged and exposed as individuals to 2° C. Also, immunized mice that were chronically cold exposed at 2° C were not protected against subsequent challenge and showed equivocal mortality ratios compared to the normal controls challenged under the same conditions.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-42
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Activation and suppression of shivering during septal and hypothalamic stimulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298675
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-16. 36 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Kawamura, Y.
Hemingway, A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-16. 36 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3377461
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Hypothalamus
Brain
Stimulation
Abstract
In acute experiments on 38 lightly anesthetized cats, the septal region of the forebrain and the hypothalamus were explored for loci whose activation by electrical stimulation produced, suppressed or failed to affect shivering. Shivering was consistently and repeatedly produced by stimulation of the dorso-medial region of the posterior hypothalamus, and sometimes by stimulation of the ventrolateral region of the septum. A greater intensity of stimulus was needed to produce more latent and less intense shivering during septal than during hypothalamic stimulation. Similarly, more intense stimulation was necessary to suppress shivering during ventromedial septal stimulation than during anterior, or ventrolateral posterior hypothalamic stimulation. The most effective stimulation frequency for both activation and suppression of shivering was 50 pulses/sec, i.e. fivefold the evoked or suppressed limb tremor frequency. On the basis of these results it was concluded that septa! influences on shivering are secondary to a primary hypothalamic modulation of this tremor. Such modulation appears to be more concerned with initiation and maintenance than with the rhythm of shivering.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-16
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Effects of decerebration and decortication on shivering in the cat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298674
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-15. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Freeman, W.J.
Hemingway, A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-15. 17 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1801784
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Cold Temperature
Brain
Oxygen consumption
Abstract
The effects of decerebration and decortication on the metabolic intensity of shivering in cats were determined. There was neither shivering nor an appreciable rise in the oxygen consumption rate of chronic decerebrate cats during rapid cooling. The intermittent somatomotor activity that was induced by rapid cooling was occasionally tremulous but it was also evoked by rapid warming and was absent during slow cooling and warming. This suggested that the motor activity of decerebrate cats during rapid cooling was more a generalized avoidance response to nociceptive stimulation than a temperature regulating mechanism. In decorticate cats shivering was depressed three days after surgery, the mean shivering to nonshivering ratio in oxygen consumption rate being 1.6 ± 0.12 (S. D. ), while the same ratio before operation was 2.6 ± 0.48 (S. D. ). One month after decortication shivering had returned to its pre-operative intensity. This suggested that the net telencephalic influences on shivering could hardly be suppresive, as suggested by some earlier investigators.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-15
Documents
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