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25 records – page 1 of 3.

Advancing Oil Spill Response in Ice-Covered Waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301424
Source
Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute and United States Arctic Research Commission. 19 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2004
  1 document  
Author
DF Dickins Associates Ltd
Source
Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute and United States Arctic Research Commission. 19 pages.
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1125061
Keywords
Sea ice
Oil spills
Response strategies
Abstract
The objective of this project is to identify programs and research and development projects that improve the ability of responders to deal with accidental oil spills in fresh or salt-water marine environments where there is ice. This includes spills that occur on top of or underneath solid, stable ice extending out from shore (land-fast), into an area of drifting ice floes (pack ice), or onto an ice-covered shoreline.
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Arctic air pollution measurements from The NOAA Barrow, Alaska, Baseline Station: 1973-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296440
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
  1 document  
Author
Schnell, Russell C.
Author Affiliation
Director, Observatory Operations, NOAA/CMDL, Boulder, Colorado, USA
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
131668
Keywords
Alaska
Barrow
Air Pollution
Methane
Carbon Dioxide
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Arctic Climate Feedbacks: Global Implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300995
Source
World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), International Arctic Programme, Oslo. 97 pages..
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
  1 document  
Author
Sommerkorn, Martin
Hassol, Susan Joy
Source
World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), International Arctic Programme, Oslo. 97 pages..
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
11404730
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Air temperature
Sea ice
Greenland Ice Sheet
Glacier retreat
Oceans
Permafrost warming and thawing
Notes
ISBN: 9782940443000
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Arctic Environmental Security and Inuit Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297323
Source
22 slides.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
April 18, 2016
  1 document  
Author
Johnson, Noor
Author Affiliation
Senior Policy Advisor, Office of International Relations, Smithsonian Institution
Source
22 slides.
Date
April 18, 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
1339824
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Food security
Housing
Sea ice
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Arctic Ocean synthesis: analysis of climate change impacts in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas with strategies for future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297070
Source
184 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
December 2008
  1 document  
Author
Hopcroft, Russ
Bluhm, Bodil
Gradinger, Rolf
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Source
184 p.
Date
December 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3882185
Keywords
Chukchi Sea
Beaufort Sea
Sea ice
Coastal erosion
Permafrost
Sea level
Marine wildlife
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Arctic sea ice decline: Projected changes in timing and extent of sea ice in the Bering and Chukchi seas

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276006
Source
USGS Open-File Report 2010-1176. iv, 32 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Douglas, DC
Author Affiliation
U.S. Geological Survey
Source
USGS Open-File Report 2010-1176. iv, 32 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5008237
Keywords
Bering Sea
Chukchi Sea
GCMs
General circulation models
Satellite data
Sea ice
Abstract
The Arctic region is warming faster than most regions of the world due in part to increasing greenhouse gases and positive feedbacks associated with the loss of snow and ice cover. One consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades—a decline that is projected to continue by state-of-the-art models. Many stakeholders are therefore interested in how global warming may change the timing and extent of sea ice Arctic-wide, and for specific regions. To inform the public and decision makers of anticipated environmental changes, scientists are striving to better understand how sea ice influences ecosystem structure, local weather, and global climate. Here, projected changes in the Bering and Chukchi Seas are examined because sea ice influences the presence of, or accessibility to, a variety of local resources of commercial and cultural value. In this study, 21st century sea ice conditions in the Bering and Chukchi Seas are based on projections by 18 general circulation models (GCMs) prepared for the fourth reporting period by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007. Sea ice projections are analyzed for each of two IPCC greenhouse gas forcing scenarios: the A1B ‘business as usual’ scenario and the A2 scenario that is somewhat more aggressive in its CO2 emissions during the second half of the century. A large spread of uncertainty among projections by all 18 models was constrained by creating model subsets that excluded GCMs that poorly simulated the 1979–2008 satellite record of ice extent and seasonality.
At the end of the 21st century (2090–2099), median sea ice projections among all combinations of model ensemble and forcing scenario were qualitatively similar. June is projected to experience the least amount of sea ice loss among all months. For the Chukchi Sea, projections show extensive ice melt during July and ice-free conditions during August, September, and October by the end of the century, with high agreement among models. High agreement also accompanies projections that the Chukchi Sea will be completely ice covered during February, March, and April at the end of the century. Large uncertainties, however, are associated with the timing and amount of partial ice cover during the intervening periods of melt and freeze. For the Bering Sea, median March ice extent is projected to be about 25 percent less than the 1979–1988 average by mid-century and 60 percent less by the end of the century. The ice-free season in the Bering Sea is projected to increase from its contemporary average of 5.5 months to a median of about 8.5 months by the end of the century. A 3-month longer ice- free season in the Bering Sea is attained by a 1-month advance in melt and a 2-month delay in freeze, meaning the ice edge typically will pass through the Bering Strait in May and January at the end of the century rather than June and November as presently observed.
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Assessment of the potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287905
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
  1 document  
Author
Yoder, Sarah
Author Affiliation
Alaska Section of Epidemiology
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Sea levels
Permafrost
Glaciers
Weather patterns
Sea ice
Temperature
Subsistence
Infectious disease
Sanitation
Health services
Abstract
Background: Over the past century, the air and water temperatures in Alaska have warmed considerably faster than in the rest of the United States. Because Alaska is the only Arctic state in the Nation, Alaskans are likely to face some climate change challenges that will be different than those encountered in other states. For example, permafrost currently underlies 80% of Alaska and provides a stable foundation for the physical infrastructure of many Alaska communities. As has already been seen in numerous villages, the groundcover that overlies permafrost is vulnerable to sinking or caving if the permafrost thaws, resulting in costly damage to physical infrastructure. The reliance on subsistence resources is another contrast to many other states. Many Alaskans depend upon subsistence harvests of fish and wildlife resources for food and to support their way of life. Some Alaskans report that the changing environment has already impacted their traditional practices. Many past efforts to characterize the potential impacts of climate change in Alaska have focused primarily on describing expected changes to the physical environment and the ecosystem, and less on describing how these changes, in addition to changes in animal and environmental health, could affect human health. Thus, a careful analysis of how climate change could affect the health of people living in Alaska is warranted. The Alaska Division of Public Health has conducted such an assessment using the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework; the assessment is based on the current National Climate Assessment (NCA) predictions for Alaska. The document is intended to provide a broad overview of the potential adverse human health impacts of climate change in Alaska and to present examples of adaptation strategies for communities to consider when planning their own response efforts. This document does not present a new model for climate change in Alaska, and it does not offer a critique of the NCA predictions for Alaska.
Documents

AssessmentofthePotentialHealthImpactsof.pdf

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Source
Natural History. February 2008: 32-38.
Date
2008
  1 document  
Author
Gearheard, Shari
Source
Natural History. February 2008: 32-38.
Date
2008
Language
English
File Size
1311739
Keywords
Arctic
Inuit
Climate chnage
Sea ice
Abstract
For generations Inuit have survived by closely observing the natural world. As the Arctic environment changes, their insights are informing science.
Documents

Change-In-The-Weather_0.pdf

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Climate change effects on community health: observations from the Northwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297296
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. Presentation at the University of Alaska Anchorage. 41 slides
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
March 16, 2010
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Author Affiliation
Director, Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Natives Tribal Health Consortium. 41 slides.
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. Presentation at the University of Alaska Anchorage. 41 slides
Date
March 16, 2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3162656
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Sea ice
Permafrost
Temperatures
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Source
International Affairs 85: 6 (2009) 1215–1232.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
  1 document  
Author
Ebinger, Charles K.
Zambetakis, Evie
Source
International Affairs 85: 6 (2009) 1215–1232.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1152919
Keywords
Arctic
Enviroment
Indigenous peoples
Sea ice
Melting
Shipping
Governance
Arctic Council
Documents

11_arctic_melt_ebinger_zambetakis.pdf

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25 records – page 1 of 3.