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Are there patient-related factors that influence sickness certification in patients with severe subjective health complaints? A cross-sectional exploratory study from different European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291449
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 21; 7(7):e015025
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-21-2017
Author
Suzanne L Merkus
Rob Hoedeman
Silje Mæland
Kristel H N Weerdesteijn
Frederieke G Schaafsma
Maud Jourdain
Jean-Paul Canevet
Cédric Rat
Johannes R Anema
Erik L Werner
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 21; 7(7):e015025
Date
Jul-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
France
General practice
General practitioners
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Motivation
Netherlands
Norway
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
To develop hypotheses about whether there are patient-related factors that influence physicians' decision-making that can explain why some patients with severe subjective health complaints (SHCs) are more likely to be granted sick leave than others.
Exploratory cross-sectional.
Assessments of patient-related factors after watching nine authentic video recordings of patients with severe SHC from a Norwegian general practice. Our previous study showed that three of these nine patients were less likely than the remaining six patients to be granted sick leave by physicians from five European countries.
In total, 10 assessors from Norway, the Netherlands and France.
The direction in which the assessments may contribute towards the decision to grant a sickness certificate (increasing or decreasing the likelihood of granting sick leave).
Physicians consider a wide variety of patient-related factors when assessing sickness certification. The overall assessment of these factors may provide an indication of whether a patient is more likely or less likely to be granted sick leave. Additionally, some single questions (notable functional limitations in the consultation, visible suffering, a clear purpose for sick leave and psychiatric comorbidity) may indicate differences between the two patient groups.
Next to the overall assessment, no notable effect of the complaints on functioning and suffering, a lack of a clear purpose for sick leave and the absence of psychiatric comorbidity may be factors that could help guide the decision to grant sick leave. These hypotheses should be tested and validated in representative samples of professionals involved in sickness certification. This may help to understand the tacit knowledge we believe physicians have when assessing work capacity of patients with severe SHC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28733298 View in PubMed
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Basic Beliefs About Behavioural Addictions Among Finnish and French Treatment Professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291331
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2017 Dec; 33(4):1311-1323
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anja Koski-Jännes
Laurence Simmat-Durand
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, 33014, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2017 Dec; 33(4):1311-1323
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Behavior, addictive - psychology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
France
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Social norms
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Video Games - psychology
Abstract
The ways in which addictive behaviours are perceived may decisively influence the ways they are handled. This study explores how treatment professionals' cultural and other background variables influence their beliefs about gambling and Internet addictions. Mailed surveys were conducted with addiction treatment professionals in Finland (n = 520) in 2007-2008 and France (n = 472) in 2010-2011. The data were analysed by descriptive statistical methods and logistic regression analysis. Cultural differences were the most consistent predictors of the responses concerning gambling and Internet addictions. The French professionals assessed the dependence risk in these behaviours as higher (P 
Notes
Cites: J Gambl Stud. 2016 Dec 31;:null PMID 28040861
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Jan 1;134:92-98 PMID 24099970
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2016;51(4):479-88 PMID 26942841
Cites: Addiction. 2013 Jul;108(7):1186-7 PMID 23668389
Cites: J Behav Addict. 2014 Dec;3(4):203-13 PMID 25592305
Cites: Addiction. 2012 Dec;107(12):2210-22 PMID 22621402
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Feb;47(3):296-308 PMID 22217128
PubMed ID
28154957 View in PubMed
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Common measure of quality of life for people with systemic sclerosis across seven European countries: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302554
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2018 07; 77(7):1032-1038
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Mwidimi Ndosi
Begonya Alcacer-Pitarch
Yannick Allanore
Francesco Del Galdo
Marc Frerix
Sílvia García-Díaz
Roger Hesselstrand
Christine Kendall
Marco Matucci-Cerinic
Ulf Mueller-Ladner
Gunnel Sandqvist
Vicenç Torrente-Segarra
Tim Schmeiser
Matylda Sierakowska
Justyna Sierakowska
Stanslaw Sierakowski
Anthony Redmond
Author Affiliation
Academic Rheumatology Unit, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2018 07; 77(7):1032-1038
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
France
Germany
Humans
Internationality
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Poland
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Scleroderma, Systemic - physiopathology - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Sickness Impact Profile
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Abstract
The aim of this study was to adapt the Systemic Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (SScQoL) into six European cultures and validate it as a common measure of quality of life in systemic sclerosis (SSc).
This was a seven-country (Germany, France, Italy, Poland, Spain, Sweden and UK) cross-sectional study. A forward-backward translation process was used to adapt the English SScQoL into target languages. SScQoL was completed by patients with SSc, then data were validated against the Rasch model. To correct local response dependency, items were grouped into the following subscales: function, emotion, sleep, social and pain and reanalysed for fit to the model, unidimensionality and cross-cultural equivalence.
The adaptation of the SScQoL was seamless in all countries except Germany. Cross-cultural validation included 1080 patients with a mean age 58.0 years (SD 13.9) and 87% were women. Local dependency was evident in individual country data. Grouping items into testlets corrected the local dependency in most country specific data. Fit to the model, reliability and unidimensionality was achieved in six-country data after cross-cultural adjustment for Italy in the social subscale. The SScQoL was then calibrated into an interval level scale.
The individual SScQoL items have translated well into five languages and overall, the scale maintained its construct validity, working well as a five-subscale questionnaire. Measures of quality of life in SSc can be directly compared across five countries (France, Poland Spain, Sweden and UK). Data from Italy are also comparable with the other five countries although require an adjustment.
PubMed ID
29463517 View in PubMed
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Dietary changes needed to improve diet sustainability: are they similar across Europe?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299762
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 07; 72(7):951-960
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Florent Vieux
Marlene Perignon
Rozenn Gazan
Nicole Darmon
Author Affiliation
MS-Nutrition, Marseille, France. florent.vieux@ms-nutrition.com.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 07; 72(7):951-960
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet, Vegetarian
Europe
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
France
Greenhouse gases
Humans
Italy
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Sweden
United Kingdom
Young Adult
Abstract
It is not known whether dietary changes able to simultaneously achieve nutritional adequacy and reduce diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) are similar across Europe when cultural and gender specificities are taken into account.
Starting from each mean observed diet in five European countries (France, UK, Italy, Finland, and Sweden) and for each gender, nutritionally adequate diets departing the least from observed diet were designed with linear programming by applying stepwise 10% GHGE reductions. Other models directly minimized GHGE.
For most countries and whatever the gender, achieving nutritional adequacy implied between-food-group subtitutions (i.e., replacing items from the sugar/fat/alcohol food-group with items from the fruit and vegetables and starchy food-groups), but increased GHGE. Once nutritional adequacy was met, to decrease GHGE, the optimization process further induced within-food-groups substitutions that were reinforced by stepwise GHGE reductions. Diet modeling results showed the need for changes in consumption of animal-based products but those changes differed according to country and gender, particularly for fish, poultry, and non-liquid milk dairy. Depending on country and gender, maximal GHGE reductions achievable ranged from 62% to 78% but they induced large departures from observed diets (at least 2.8?kg/day of total absolute weight change) by modifying the quantity of at least 99% of food items.
Setting nutritional goals with no consideration for the environment may increase GHGE. However, diet sustainability can be improved by substituting food items from the sugar/fat/alcohol food group with fruit, vegetables, and starches, and country-specific changes in consumption of animal-based products. Standardized surveys and individual diet modeling are promising tools for further exploring ways to achieve sustainable diets in Europe.
PubMed ID
29402959 View in PubMed
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Effects of a participatory approach, with systematic impact matrix analysis in herd health planning in organic dairy cattle herds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298585
Source
Animal. 2019 Feb; 13(2):358-366
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
K Sjöström
S Sternberg-Lewerin
I Blanco-Penedo
J E Duval
M Krieger
U Emanuelson
N Fall
Author Affiliation
1Department of Clinical Sciences,Division of Ruminant Medicine and Veterinary Epidemiology,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,PO Box 7054,SE-750 07 Uppsala,Sweden.
Source
Animal. 2019 Feb; 13(2):358-366
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle - physiology
Dairying - methods
Female
France
Germany
Health planning
Health status
Organic Agriculture - methods
Sweden
Abstract
The animal health and welfare status in European organic dairy production does not in all aspects meet the organic principles and consumers' expectations and needs to be improved. To achieve this, tailored herd health planning, targeted to the specific situation of individual farms could be of use. The aim of this study was to apply herd health planning in a structured participatory approach, with impact matrix analysis, not previously used in this context, in European organic dairy farms and to assess changes in animal health and welfare. Herd health planning farm visits were conducted on 122 organic dairy farms in France, Germany and Sweden. The farmer, the herd veterinarian and/or an advisor took part in the farm discussions. The researcher served as facilitator. Baseline data on the animal health status of the individual farm, collected from national milk recording schemes, were presented as an input for the discussion. Thereafter a systematic impact matrix analysis was performed. This was to capture the complexity of individual farms with the aim to identify the farm-specific factors that could have a strong impact on animal health. The participants (i.e. farmer, veterinarian and advisor) jointly identified areas in need of improvement, taking the health status and the interconnected farm system components into account, and appropriate actions were jointly identified. The researcher took minutes during the discussions, and these were shared with the participants. No intervention was made by the researcher, and further actions were left with the participants. The number of actions per farm ranged from 0 to 22. The change in mortality, metabolic diseases, reproductive performance and udder health was assessed at two time points, and potential determinators of the change were evaluated with linear regression models. A significant association was seen between change in udder health, as measured by the somatic cell count, and country. At the first follow-up, a significant association was also found between change in the proportion of prolonged calving interval and the farmers' desire to improve reproductive health as well as with an increase in herd size, but this was not seen at the second follow-up. The degree of implementation of the actions was good (median 67%, lower quartile 40%, upper quartile 83%). To conclude, the degree of implementation was quite high, improvement of animal health could not be linked to the herd health planning approach. However, the approach was highly appreciated by the participants and deserves further study.
PubMed ID
30092852 View in PubMed
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Experiencing health-related quality of life in paediatric short stature - a cross-cultural analysis of statements from patients and parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294586
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2017 Nov; 24(6):1370-1376
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Rachel Sommer
Monika Bullinger
John Chaplin
Ju-Ky Do
Mick Power
Andreas Pleil
Julia Quitmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2017 Nov; 24(6):1370-1376
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dwarfism - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
France
Germany
Humans
Male
Parents
Quality of Life - psychology
Social Support
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
United Kingdom
Abstract
Direct assessment of the patient perspective is necessary to thoroughly understand patients' experiences of disease. We aimed to examine information from children with short stature on their perceived HrQoL within 5 European countries.
Patients, identified through clinical databases, were approached by their clinicians according to the inclusion criteria regarding a diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency or idiopathic short stature and age requirements. A focus group methodology was applied in 84 children and 112 parents. Based on a category system, individual statements were allocated to domains. To evaluate the emerging topics, qualitative content analysis was conducted. Domains and respective coding frequencies per category were compared across countries and respondents.
The highest number of statements produced by the children and parents were related to social (29%) and emotional needs and concerns (28%). In particular, children stressed their experience of social exclusion but also their perception of social support. Regarding emotional needs, they stated mainly the desire to be taller in order to be less teased by peers. National differences were identified, for example, Swedish (22%) and British (16%) children and their parents (Sweden 26%; Britain 23%) stressed physical HrQoL aspects, whereas German children (21%) strongly focused on treatment aspects, mainly the benefit of treatment.
Comprehensive knowledge of the impact of a chronic condition such as short stature on wellbeing is an important precondition of effective treatment. Because socioemotional topics were rated in all the countries to be most important, interventions aimed at improving HrQoL should target social and emotional responses to short stature.
PubMed ID
28675583 View in PubMed
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Iodine content in bulk biomass of wild-harvested and cultivated edible seaweeds: Inherent variations determine species-specific daily allowable consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295695
Source
Food Chem. 2018 Jul 15; 254:333-339
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-15-2018
Author
Michael Y Roleda
Jorunn Skjermo
Hélène Marfaing
Rósa Jónsdóttir
Céline Rebours
Anna Gietl
Dagmar B Stengel
Udo Nitschke
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), 8027 Bodø, Norway. Electronic address: Michael.Roleda@nibio.no.
Source
Food Chem. 2018 Jul 15; 254:333-339
Date
Jul-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aquaculture
Biomass
Food analysis
France
Humans
Iceland
Iodine - analysis
Norway
Phaeophyta - chemistry
Recommended dietary allowances
Rhodophyta - chemistry
Seaweed - chemistry
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Species Specificity
Abstract
This study represents a large-scale investigation into iodine contents in three commercially important and edible seaweed species from the North Atlantic: the brown algae Saccharina latissima and Alaria esculenta, and the red alga Palmaria palmata. Variability among and within species were explored in terms of temporal and spatial variations in addition to biomass source. Mean iodine concentration in bulk seaweed biomass was species-specific: Saccharina?>?Alaria?>?Palmaria. Iodine contents of Saccharina biomass were similar between years and seasons, but varied significantly between sampling locations and biomass sources. In Alaria and Palmaria, none of the independent variables examined contributed significantly to the small variations observed. Our data suggest that all three species are rich sources of iodine, and only 32, 283, or 2149?mg dry weight of unprocessed dry biomass of Saccharina, Alaria, or Palmaria, respectively, meets the recommended daily intake levels for most healthy humans.
PubMed ID
29548461 View in PubMed
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Isothiazolinones are still widely used in paints purchased in five European countries: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295021
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 Apr; 78(4):246-253
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Andreas V Thomsen
Jakob F Schwensen
Rossana Bossi
Piu Banerjee
Elena Giménez-Arnau
Jean-Pierre Lepoittevin
Carola Lidén
Wolfgang Uter
Ian R White
Jeanne D Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, National Allergy Research Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev and Gentofte, 2900, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 Apr; 78(4):246-253
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology - prevention & control
France
Germany
Humans
Incidence
Materials Testing
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Paint - adverse effects - analysis
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Thiazoles - analysis - chemistry
United Kingdom
Abstract
An increasing incidence of contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone (MI) has been seen, caused, in particular, by cosmetic products and paints. A study from 2015 showed that 93.0% of paints bought in five European countries contained MI. New regulations have been discussed for paints in the EU, which may have influenced this market.
To re-evaluate the use and concentrations of MI and four other isothiazolinones in water-based wall paints.
Water-based white wall paints (n?=?60) were purchased in retail stores in five European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The paints were analysed for isothiazolione content by the use of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ultraviolet detection, and the results were confirmed with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.
MI was identified in 55 (91.7%) of the paints, with concentrations ranging from 1.1 to 142.7?ppm. The other isothiazolinones were identified in 20.0% [methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)] to 88.3% [benzisothiazolinone (BIT)] of the paints. BIT concentrations varied significantly between countries, whereas MI and MCI concentrations did not. There were no statistically significant differences in MI, MCI and BIT concentrations between the current study and the 2015 study.
MI and other isothiazolinones are widely used in paints available in Europe. Their use does not seem to be decreasing.
PubMed ID
29265415 View in PubMed
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Job strain and loss of healthy life years between ages 50 and 75 by sex and occupational position: analyses of 64 934 individuals from four prospective cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302053
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2018 07; 75(7):486-493
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Hugo Westerlund
Holendro S Chungkham
Jussi Vahtera
Naja H Rod
Kristina Alexanderson
Marcel Goldberg
Mika Kivimäki
Sari Stenholm
Loretta G Platts
Marie Zins
Jenny Head
Author Affiliation
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2018 07; 75(7):486-493
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Chronic Disease
Employment
Female
Finland
France
Health status
Humans
Life expectancy
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Stress
Occupations
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Poor psychosocial working conditions increase the likelihood of various types of morbidity and may substantially limit quality of life and possibilities to remain in paid work. To date, however, no studies to our knowledge have quantified the extent to which poor psychosocial working conditions reduce healthy or chronic disease-free life expectancy, which was the focus of this study.
Data were derived from four cohorts with repeat data: the Finnish Public Sector Study (Finland), GAZEL (France), the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (Sweden) and Whitehall II (UK). Healthy (in good self-rated health) life expectancy (HLE) and chronic disease-free (free from cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes) life expectancy (CDFLE) was calculated from age 50 to 75 based on 64?394 individuals with data on job strain (high demands in combination with low control) at baseline and health at baseline and follow-up.
Multistate life table models showed that job strain was consistently related to shorter HLE (overall 1.7 years difference). The difference in HLE was more pronounced among men (2.0 years compared with 1.5 years for women) and participants in lower occupational positions (2.5 years among low-grade men compared with 1.7 years among high-grade men). Similar differences in HLE, although smaller, were observed among those in intermediate or high occupational positions. Job strain was additionally associated with shorter CDFLE, although this association was weaker and somewhat inconsistent.
These findings suggest that individuals with job strain have a shorter health expectancy compared with those without job strain.
PubMed ID
29735751 View in PubMed
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National funding for mental health research in Finland, France, Spain and the United Kingdom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291605
Source
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2017 09; 27(9):892-899
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
09-2017
Author
Jean-Baptiste Hazo
Coralie Gandré
Marion Leboyer
Carla Obradors-Tarragó
Stefano Belli
David McDaid
A-La Park
Maria Victoria Maliandi
Kristian Wahlbeck
Til Wykes
Jim van Os
Josep Maria Haro
Karine Chevreul
Author Affiliation
ECEVE, UMRS 1123, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM, Paris, France; AP-HP, URC-Eco, DHU Pepsy, F-75004 Paris, France; Foundation FondaMental, French National Science Foundation, Créteil, France. Electronic address: jeanbaptiste.hazo@urc-eco.fr.
Source
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2017 09; 27(9):892-899
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - economics
Charities - economics
Finland
France
Humans
Mental Health - economics
Spain
United Kingdom
Abstract
As part of the Roamer project, we aimed at revealing the share of health research budgets dedicated to mental health, as well as on the amounts allocated to such research for four European countries. Finland, France, Spain and the United Kingdom national public and non-profit funding allocated to mental health research in 2011 were investigated using, when possible, bottom-up approaches. Specifics of the data collection varied from country to country. The total amount of public and private not for profit mental health research funding for Finland, France, Spain and the UK was €10·2, €84·8, €16·8, and €127·6 million, respectively. Charities accounted for a quarter of the funding in the UK and less than six per cent elsewhere. The share of health research dedicated to mental health ranged from 4·0% in the UK to 9·7% in Finland. When compared to the DALY attributable to mental disorders, Spain, France, Finland, and the UK invested respectively €12·5, €31·2, €39·5, and €48·7 per DALY. Among these European countries, there is an important gap between the level of mental health research funding and the economic and epidemiologic burden of mental disorders.
PubMed ID
28647453 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.