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(3)H activity comparison between FTMC, VNIIM and LNE-LNHB.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278451
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Philippe Cassette
Paulius Butkus
Arunas Gudelis
Tatiana Shilnikova
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
France
Internationality
Laboratories - standards
Lithuania
Nuclear Medicine - standards
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Scintillation Counting
Sensitivity and specificity
Tritium - analysis - standards
Abstract
An activity comparison of tritiated water was organized in 2013 between 3 laboratories: FTMC (Lithuania), LNE-LNHB (France) and VNIIM (Russia). The solution was prepared by LNHB and ampoules were sent to the others laboratories. This solution was standardized in terms of activity per unit mass by participant laboratories using the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method in liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The tritiated water solution is traceable to the solution prepared by LNHB for the CCRI(II)-K2.H-3 2009 (3)H international comparison.
PubMed ID
26651170 View in PubMed
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Adaptive and plastic responses of Quercus petraea populations to climate across Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286725
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Jul;23(7):2831-2847
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Cuauhtémoc Sáenz-Romero
Jean-Baptiste Lamy
Alexis Ducousso
Brigitte Musch
François Ehrenmann
Sylvain Delzon
Stephen Cavers
Wladyslaw Chalupka
Said Dagdas
Jon Kehlet Hansen
Steve J Lee
Mirko Liesebach
Hans-Martin Rau
Achilleas Psomas
Volker Schneck
Wilfried Steiner
Niklaus E Zimmermann
Antoine Kremer
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Jul;23(7):2831-2847
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Climate change
Denmark
Europe
France
Norway
Quercus - growth & development
Abstract
How temperate forests will respond to climate change is uncertain; projections range from severe decline to increased growth. We conducted field tests of sessile oak (Quercus petraea), a widespread keystone European forest tree species, including more than 150 000 trees sourced from 116 geographically diverse populations. The tests were planted on 23 field sites in six European countries, in order to expose them to a wide range of climates, including sites reflecting future warmer and drier climates. By assessing tree height and survival, our objectives were twofold: (i) to identify the source of differential population responses to climate (genetic differentiation due to past divergent climatic selection vs. plastic responses to ongoing climate change) and (ii) to explore which climatic variables (temperature or precipitation) trigger the population responses. Tree growth and survival were modeled for contemporary climate and then projected using data from four regional climate models for years 2071-2100, using two greenhouse gas concentration trajectory scenarios each. Overall, results indicated a moderate response of tree height and survival to climate variation, with changes in dryness (either annual or during the growing season) explaining the major part of the response. While, on average, populations exhibited local adaptation, there was significant clinal population differentiation for height growth with winter temperature at the site of origin. The most moderate climate model (HIRHAM5-EC; rcp4.5) predicted minor decreases in height and survival, while the most extreme model (CCLM4-GEM2-ES; rcp8.5) predicted large decreases in survival and growth for southern and southeastern edge populations (Hungary and Turkey). Other nonmarginal populations with continental climates were predicted to be severely and negatively affected (Bercé, France), while populations at the contemporary northern limit (colder and humid maritime regions; Denmark and Norway) will probably not show large changes in growth and survival in response to climate change.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27885754 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy between prescriptions and CHADS(2) score recommendations in geriatric patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101701
Source
Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil. 2011 Mar;9(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Nolya Haïda
Marion Albouy-Llaty
Céline Baudemont
Fabienne Bellarbre
Marc Paccalin
Author Affiliation
Département de gériatrie-Pôle médecine. m.paccalin@chu-poitiers.fr
Source
Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil. 2011 Mar;9(1):39-44
Date
Mar-2011
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
France
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for stroke. Thromboprophylaxis with anticoagulant reduces the incidence of stroke and is warranted by the CHADS(2) recommendations when score =2. But such therapy remains underused particularly among elderly patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the adequacy between prescriptions and CHADS(2) recommendations in geriatric hospitalised patients with AF. Method: retrospective study set in the Geriatrics Department of the University hospital of Poitiers (France), of patients >75 y with AF, between July and December 2009. The description of the patients taken into the count: epidemiological data, functional daily activities (score GIR), cognitive assessment, antithrombotic treatment, and evaluation of the CHADS(2) and HEMORR(2)HAGES scores. Results: in this study161 hospitalisations were analysed, mean age of the patients was 87.4?±?5.4 years. Antithrombotic treatment was prescribed in 84% of cases. The overall conformity to CHADS(2) recommendations was 44%. Most of hospitalisations (88.9%) included patients with CHADS(2) score =2. Non-conformity rate was up to 60% in this group with 5 significant variables: MMSE score
PubMed ID
21586375 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perceptions of parental practices: a cross-national comparison of Canada, France, and Italy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142091
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Apr;34(2):225-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Michel Claes
Cyrille Perchec
Dave Miranda
Amélie Benoit
Françoise Bariaud
Margherita Lanz
Elena Marta
Eric Lacourse
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Canada. michel.claes@sympatico.ca
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Apr;34(2):225-38
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
France
Humans
Italy
Male
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations - ethnology
Parenting - ethnology
Punishment
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
This study compares two dimensions of parenting-emotional bonding and control-as perceived by adolescents living in three countries: Canada (province of Québec), France, and Italy. A cross-sectional sample was composed of 1256 adolescents who filled out a self-report questionnaire. Multiple Correspondence Analyses provided a graphic synthesis of cross-cultural results. Results indicate that parents are perceived as highly emotionally bonded, yet the perception of parental control produced two contrasting models. Canadian adolescents perceive less control and disciplinary actions from parents, and more tolerance. Conversely, Italian adolescents perceive more requirements and rules, and stricter disciplinary actions, while French adolescents' perceptions fall between the two. Results also suggested a gradual decrease in the perception of parental control between the ages of 11 and 19 years across all three countries. This reduction in parental constraints is perceived earlier by Canadian adolescents and later by Italian adolescents.
PubMed ID
20637500 View in PubMed
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American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status system: a multicentre Francophone study to analyse reasons for classification disagreement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131371
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2011 Oct;28(10):742-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Philippe Cuvillon
Emmanuel Nouvellon
Emmanuel Marret
Pierre Albaladejo
Louis-Philippe Fortier
Pascale Fabbro-Perray
Jean-Marc Malinovsky
Jacques Ripart
Author Affiliation
Division of Anesthésie Réanimation Douleur Urgences, Hôpital Universitaire Caremeau, Nîmes France. philippe.cuvillon@wanadoo.fr
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2011 Oct;28(10):742-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anesthesiology - methods - standards
Canada
Cross-Over Studies
Female
France
Health Care Surveys
Health status
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Single-Blind Method
Societies
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Variability of American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) physical status scores attributed to the same patient by multiple physicians has been reported in several studies. In these studies, the population was limited and diseases that induced disagreement were not analysed.
To evaluate the reproducibility of ASA physical status assessment on a large population, as used in current practice before scheduled surgery.
Multicentre, randomised, blinded cross-over observational study.
During a 2-week period in nine institutions, ASA physical status and details of assessment performed routinely by anaesthesiologists for patients who underwent elective surgery were recorded. Records were blinded (including ASA physical status) by an independent statistical division and returned randomly to one of the nine centres for reassessment by accredited specialist anaesthesiologists.
The level of agreement between the two measurements of the ASA physical status was calculated by using the weighted Kappa coefficient.
During the study period, 1554 anaesthesia records were collected and 197 were excluded from analysis because of missing data. After the initial evaluation, the distribution of ASA physical status grades was as follows: ASA 1, 571; ASA 2, 591; ASA 3, 177; and ASA 4, 18. After the final evaluation, the distribution of ASA grades was as follows: ASA 1, 583; ASA 2, 520; ASA 3, 223; and ASA 4, 31. Two per cent of the patients had an underestimation of their physical status. The degree of agreement between the two measures evaluated by the weighted Kappa coefficient was 0.53 (0.49-0.56). No difference was observed between public and private institutions. Patients with co-existing diseases, obesity, allergy, sleep apnoea, obstructive lung disease, renal insufficiency and hypertension were least likely to have been graded correctly.
The degree of agreement between two measures of the ASA physical status grade is moderate and influenced by staff characteristics and the complexity of diseases.
PubMed ID
21912242 View in PubMed
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[A nursing career guided by a keen interest in emergency care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105828
Source
Rev Infirm. 2013 Nov;195:30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Aymeric Lapp
Author Affiliation
Centre psychothérapique de Nancy, Laxou, France. alertofeu@voila.fr
Source
Rev Infirm. 2013 Nov;195:30-1
Date
Nov-2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Nursing
France
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Nurses, Male
Abstract
Aymeric Lapp has been a state-registered nurse for ten years. Particularly interested in emergency care and procedures, in this article he shares the highlights of his career, exploring the different sides of a profession whose practices he now enjoys teaching to others.
PubMed ID
24303669 View in PubMed
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Are there patient-related factors that influence sickness certification in patients with severe subjective health complaints? A cross-sectional exploratory study from different European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291449
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 21; 7(7):e015025
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-21-2017
Author
Suzanne L Merkus
Rob Hoedeman
Silje Mæland
Kristel H N Weerdesteijn
Frederieke G Schaafsma
Maud Jourdain
Jean-Paul Canevet
Cédric Rat
Johannes R Anema
Erik L Werner
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 21; 7(7):e015025
Date
Jul-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
France
General practice
General practitioners
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Motivation
Netherlands
Norway
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
To develop hypotheses about whether there are patient-related factors that influence physicians' decision-making that can explain why some patients with severe subjective health complaints (SHCs) are more likely to be granted sick leave than others.
Exploratory cross-sectional.
Assessments of patient-related factors after watching nine authentic video recordings of patients with severe SHC from a Norwegian general practice. Our previous study showed that three of these nine patients were less likely than the remaining six patients to be granted sick leave by physicians from five European countries.
In total, 10 assessors from Norway, the Netherlands and France.
The direction in which the assessments may contribute towards the decision to grant a sickness certificate (increasing or decreasing the likelihood of granting sick leave).
Physicians consider a wide variety of patient-related factors when assessing sickness certification. The overall assessment of these factors may provide an indication of whether a patient is more likely or less likely to be granted sick leave. Additionally, some single questions (notable functional limitations in the consultation, visible suffering, a clear purpose for sick leave and psychiatric comorbidity) may indicate differences between the two patient groups.
Next to the overall assessment, no notable effect of the complaints on functioning and suffering, a lack of a clear purpose for sick leave and the absence of psychiatric comorbidity may be factors that could help guide the decision to grant sick leave. These hypotheses should be tested and validated in representative samples of professionals involved in sickness certification. This may help to understand the tacit knowledge we believe physicians have when assessing work capacity of patients with severe SHC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28733298 View in PubMed
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Assessment of occupational exposure to pesticides in a pooled analysis of agricultural cohorts within the AGRICOH consortium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282689
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2016 Jun;73(6):359-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Maartje Brouwer
Leah Schinasi
Laura E Beane Freeman
Isabelle Baldi
Pierre Lebailly
Gilles Ferro
Karl-Christian Nordby
Joachim Schüz
Maria E Leon
Hans Kromhout
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2016 Jun;73(6):359-67
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Agriculture
Cohort Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Female
France
Humans
Iowa
Leukemia
Lymphoma
Male
Middle Aged
North Carolina
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Pesticides - analysis
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Self Report
Sex Distribution
United States
Abstract
This paper describes methods developed to assess occupational exposure to pesticide active ingredients and chemical groups, harmonised across cohort studies included in the first AGRICOH pooling project, focused on the risk of lymph-haematological malignancies.
Three prospective agricultural cohort studies were included: US Agricultural Health Study (AHS), French Agriculture and Cancer Study (AGRICAN) and Cancer in the Norwegian Agricultural Population (CNAP). Self-reported pesticide use was collected in AHS. Crop-exposure matrices (CEMs) were developed for AGRICAN and CNAP. We explored the potential impact of these differences in exposure assessment by comparing a CEM approach estimating exposure in AHS with self-reported pesticide use.
In AHS, 99% of participants were considered exposed to pesticides, 68% in AGRICAN and 63% in CNAP. For all cohorts combined (n=316 270), prevalence of exposure ranged from 19% to 59% for 14 chemical groups examined, and from 13% to 46% for 33 active ingredients. Exposures were highly correlated within AGRICAN and CNAP where CEMs were applied; they were less correlated in AHS. Poor agreement was found between self-reported pesticide use and assigned exposure in AHS using a CEM approach resembling the assessment for AGRICAN (? -0.00 to 0.33) and CNAP (? -0.01 to 0.14).
We developed country-specific CEMs to assign occupational exposure to pesticides in cohorts lacking self-reported data on the use of specific pesticides. The different exposure assessment methods applied may overestimate or underestimate actual exposure prevalence, and additional work is needed to better estimate how far the exposure estimates deviate from reality.
PubMed ID
27009271 View in PubMed
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Assisted Peritoneal Dialysis for Older People with End-Stage Renal Disease: The French and Danish Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276580
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2015 Nov;35(6):663-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Clémence Béchade
Thierry Lobbedez
Per Ivarsen
Johan V Povlsen
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2015 Nov;35(6):663-6
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
France
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health Care Costs
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - economics
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Male
Medical Assistance - economics
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics
Peritoneal Dialysis - economics - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Older people are the largest and fastest growing group of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and, due to advanced age and a heavy burden of comorbidities, they are usually not candidates for renal transplantation or home-based dialysis treatment. Some of the barriers for home treatment are non-modifiable, but the majority of physical disabilities and psychosocial problems can be overcome provided that assistance is offered to the patients at home.In the present review, we describe the programs for assisted peritoneal dialysis (PD) in France and Denmark, respectively. In both nations, assisted PD is totally publicly funded, and the cost of assisted PD is comparable to the cost of in-center HD. Assisted continuous ambulatory PD (aCAPD) is the preferred modality in France whereas assisted automated PD (aAPD) is the preferred modality in Denmark. Assistants are professional nurses or healthcare technicians briefly educated by expert PD nurses from the dialysis unit.The establishment of a program for assisted PD may increase the number of patients actually treated with PD and may reduce the risk of PD technique failure and prolong PD duration. Compared with autonomous PD patients, patients on assisted PD may have shorter patient survival and peritonitis-free survival indicating that, besides advanced age and the burden of comorbidities, dependency on help may be an independent risk factor for poorer outcome.Assisted PD is an evolving dialysis modality, and may in the future prove to be a feasible complementary alternative to in-center hemodialysis (HD) for the growing group of dependent older patients with ESRD.
PubMed ID
26702010 View in PubMed
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Basic Beliefs About Behavioural Addictions Among Finnish and French Treatment Professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291331
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2017 Dec; 33(4):1311-1323
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anja Koski-Jännes
Laurence Simmat-Durand
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, 33014, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2017 Dec; 33(4):1311-1323
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Behavior, addictive - psychology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
France
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Social norms
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Video Games - psychology
Abstract
The ways in which addictive behaviours are perceived may decisively influence the ways they are handled. This study explores how treatment professionals' cultural and other background variables influence their beliefs about gambling and Internet addictions. Mailed surveys were conducted with addiction treatment professionals in Finland (n = 520) in 2007-2008 and France (n = 472) in 2010-2011. The data were analysed by descriptive statistical methods and logistic regression analysis. Cultural differences were the most consistent predictors of the responses concerning gambling and Internet addictions. The French professionals assessed the dependence risk in these behaviours as higher (P 
Notes
Cites: J Gambl Stud. 2016 Dec 31;:null PMID 28040861
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Jan 1;134:92-98 PMID 24099970
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2016;51(4):479-88 PMID 26942841
Cites: Addiction. 2013 Jul;108(7):1186-7 PMID 23668389
Cites: J Behav Addict. 2014 Dec;3(4):203-13 PMID 25592305
Cites: Addiction. 2012 Dec;107(12):2210-22 PMID 22621402
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Feb;47(3):296-308 PMID 22217128
PubMed ID
28154957 View in PubMed
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175 records – page 1 of 18.