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2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: An annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142153
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Jul;56(7):649-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Norm Campbell
Margaret Moy Lum Kwong
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Jul;56(7):649-53
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diabetic Angiopathies - prevention & control - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing
Guideline Adherence
Health promotion
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Program Evaluation
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1410-915983291
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1401-915983290
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Dec;23(14):1124-3018060097
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Apr 10;358(15):1547-5918378520
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1441-918490640
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1458-6018490641
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):485-9018548146
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):507-1218548150
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;21(11):1210-518772857
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Nov 25;52(22):1749-5719022154
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Dec 4;359(23):2417-2819052124
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):128-3419114646
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 Apr 28;6(4):e100005819399161
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-8619417858
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-9819417859
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):299-30219417860
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 Jun;30(12):1434-919454575
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Jul;27(7):1472-719474763
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Sep;54(3):475-8119620517
Cites: J Hypertens. 2006 Mar;24(3):423-3016467640
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Feb 27;287(8):1003-1011866648
Cites: JAMA. 2002 May 15;287(19):2542-5112020335
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):657-6112107423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Jan;22(1):11-915106785
Cites: Fam Pract. 1997 Apr;14(2):160-769137956
Cites: Blood Press. 1997 Nov;6(6):357-649495661
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1998 Mar;11(3 Pt 2):57S-61S9546039
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jan 15-21;365(9455):217-2315652604
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2010 Sep;56(9):86920841585
PubMed ID
20631271 View in PubMed
Less detail

2011 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology educational needs assessment report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133912
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 May;25(5):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Craig Render
Sandra Daniels
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 May;25(5):244-6
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Continuing
Gastroenterology - education
Humans
Needs Assessment
PubMed ID
21647455 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About the conditions of training and retraining of physicians and nurse personnel for the primary medical sanitary care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155048
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 May-Jun;(3):41-4
Publication Type
Article

Academic detailing has no effect on prescribing of asthma medication in Danish general practice: a 3-year randomized controlled trial with 12-monthly follow-ups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15166
Source
Fam Pract. 2004 Jun;21(3):248-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Klaus Witt
Erik Knudsen
Susanne Ditlevsen
Hanne Hollnagel
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. k.witt@gpmed.ku.dk
Source
Fam Pract. 2004 Jun;21(3):248-53
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - drug therapy
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Educational Status
Family Practice
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Educational outreach visits, particularly when combined with social marketing, appear to be a promising approach to modifying health professional behaviour, especially prescribing. Results from previous studies have shown a varying effect. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of academic detailing as a method of implementing a clinical guideline in general practice. METHODS: A cluster randomized, controlled, blinded study was carried out of the effect of an academic detail visit compared with postal distribution of a guideline for prescribing asthma medication. Half the practices in a Danish county with 100 practices were visited once. The outcome measure was routinely collected data from all Danish pharmacies on the sales of asthma medication. Data were collected monthly for 2 years before to 1 year after the intervention. RESULTS: There was no effect on the pattern of prescription of asthma medicines following the visit, neither immediately nor long term. CONCLUSION: We found no effect of academic detailing as a single intervention.
PubMed ID
15128684 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205465
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
D. Oneschuk
E. Bruera
Author Affiliation
Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):23-7
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Humans
Palliative Care
Schools, Medical
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level.
PubMed ID
9616456 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based (general practice) paediatricians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200598
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1999 Nov;81(5):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
I. Haney
M. Ipp
W. Feldman
B W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1999 Nov;81(5):409-12
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical, Continuing
Educational Status
Female
Heart Murmurs - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pediatrics - education - standards
Physical Examination - standards
Referral and Consultation
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To determine the diagnostic accuracy of physical examination by office based (general practice) paediatricians in the evaluation of heart murmurs.
Each of 30 office based paediatricians blindly examined a random sample of children with murmurs (43% of which were pathological). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and were related to paediatricians' characteristics.
Mean (SD) sensitivity was 82 (24)% with a mean specificity of 72 (24)% in differentiating pathological from innocent murmurs, with further investigations requested for 54% of assessments. The addition of a referral strategy would have increased mean sensitivity to 87 (20)% and specificity to 98 (8)%. Diagnostic accuracy was not significantly related to the paediatricians' age, education or practice characteristics, but was related to referral practices and confidence in assessment.
Diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based paediatricians is suboptimal, and educational strategies are needed to improve accuracy and reduce unnecessary referrals and misdiagnosis.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1967 May 4;276(18):1008-136022469
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 1988 Apr;19(1):107-133372064
Cites: Pediatrics. 1990 Oct;86(4):497-5002216611
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1991 Jul;150(9):623-61915512
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Nov 21;305(6864):1264-51477570
Cites: Am Heart J. 1960 Jun;59:844-5513823663
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1995 Jan;154(1):15-77895749
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1995 Jan;34(1):25-317720325
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996 Feb;150(2):169-748556121
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1995 Dec;84(12):1379-818645955
Cites: Pediatrics. 1997 Jan;99(1):1-38989329
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1993 Sep;147(9):975-78362816
PubMed ID
10519714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving cardiovascular health through continuing interprofessional development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190531
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
D M Kaufman
J. McClaran
M. Toombs
S. Beardall
I. Levy
A. Chockalingam
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy - education
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing
Health Behavior
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Life Style
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Public Health
Abstract
In order to achieve cardiovascular health for all Canadians, the ACHIC (Achieving Cardiovascular Health in Canada) partnership advocates that health promotion for healthy lifestyles be incorporated into practice, and that the consistent messages and professional skills required to motivate patients and the public be acquired through interprofessional education and development. Professional education specialists are essential members of health care promotion teams with expertise to develop educational interventions that impact behaviours of health professionals and subsequent patient outcomes. Continuing medical education (CME) is in evolution to continuing professional development (CPD), and then to continuing inter-professional development (CID). Providers of health promotion, public health, and health care can work with health educators to complete the cascade of learning, change in practice, and improvement in patient outcomes. The Canadian health care system can empower Canadians to achieve cardiovascular health, the most important health challenge in the 21st century.
PubMed ID
11962121 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A cognitive approach to overutilization of health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192488
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4745-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001

793 records – page 1 of 80.