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62235 records – page 1 of 6224.

1,005 delayed days: a study of adult psychiatric discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244608
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;32(4):266-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
P A Barrette
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;32(4):266-8
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Discharge
Abstract
Delay in discharge of psychiatric patients frequently is attributed to the lack of available community resources, or to the unwillingness of the patient or his family to accept discharge or transfer to another facility. The role of the psychiatric system itself rarely is mentioned as a factor. A study of 138 psychiatric patients in a Canadian community hospital in 1978 showed that 35 per cent were judged to be delayed in their discharge. By far the greatest source of delay was the administration of the various psychiatric services within the system. Delayed patients were found to be statistically similar to nondelayed patients, except for the delayed patients tendency to be poorer and to be overrepresented on two of the six wards studied. The cost implications of the delays in discharge are discussed, as are suggestions for solving the problems within the administrative framework.
PubMed ID
7227988 View in PubMed
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The 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus is not linked to calcium stone formation or calciuric phenotypes in French-Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206213
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
P. Scott
D. Ouimet
Y. Proulx
M L Trouvé
G. Guay
B. Gagnon
L. Valiquette
A. Bonnardeaux
Author Affiliation
Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Calcium - urine
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Kidney Calculi - enzymology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Pedigree
Phenotype
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Calcium urolithiasis is often associated with increased intestinal absorption and urine excretion of calcium, and has been suggested to result from increased vitamin D production. The role of the enzyme 1 alpha-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting step in active vitamin D production, was evaluated in 36 families, including 28 sibships with at least a pair of affected sibs, using qualitative and quantitative trait linkage analyses. Sibs with a verified calcium urolithiasis passage (n = 117) had higher 24-h calciuria (P = 0.03), oxaluria (P = 0.02), fasting and postcalcium loading urine calcium/creatinine (Ca/cr) ratios (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002, respectively), and serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels (P = 0.02) compared with nonstone-forming sibs (n = 120). Markers from a 9-centiMorgan interval encompassing the VDD1 locus on chromosome 12q13-14 (putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase) were analyzed in 28 sibships (146 sib pairs) of single and recurrent stone formers and in 14 sibships (65 sib pairs) with recurrent-only (> or = 3 episodes) stone-forming sibs. Two-point and multipoint analyses did not reveal excess in alleles shared among affected sibs at the VDD1 locus. Linkage of stone formation to the VDD1 locus could be excluded, respectively, with a lambda d of 2.0 (single and recurrent stone formers) and 3.25 (recurrent stone formers). Quantitative trait analyses revealed no evidence for linkage to 24-h calciuria and oxaluria, serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels, and Ca/cr ratios. This study shows absence of linkage of the putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus to calcium stone formation or to quantitative traits associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria. In addition, there is coaggregation of calciuric and oxaluric phenotypes with stone formation.
PubMed ID
9513904 View in PubMed
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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2003 Oct-Dec;18(4):278-9015310039
Cites: Disaster Manag Response. 2005 Jan-Mar;3(1):11-615627125
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 May;172(5):471-717521092
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):733-720197507
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):9-1019557952
Cites: Science. 2010 Feb 5;327(5966):638-920133550
Cites: Nature. 2010 Feb 18;463(7283):878-920164905
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Mar 18;362(11):e3820200362
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):3-819557951
PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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The -1C to T polymorphism in the annexin A5 gene is not associated with the risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death in middle-aged Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53135
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
K S Kaikkonen
S. Kakko
M L Kortelainen
J M Tapanainen
M J Savolainen
Y. Antero Kesäniemi
H V Huikuri
E R Savolainen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5' Untranslated Regions - genetics
Adult
Aged
Annexin A5 - genetics
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A common polymorphism (-1C to T) in the translation initiation sequence of annexin A5 (ANV) gene has recently been associated with a decreased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the present study was to analyze the association between the ANV genepolymorphism and the risk of AMI and ischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged Finnish males. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study involving three distinct groups of subjects was carried out: (1) victims of SCD (n=98), (2) survivors of AMI (n=212), and (3) randomly selected control subjects without any history of coronary heart disease (n=243). The ANV polymorphism was genotyped in each study group. RESULTS: Among the control group of healthy Finnish males the prevalence rates of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 83.1%, 15.2%, and 1.6%, respectively. Among the survivors of AMI, the prevalence rates of CC, CT, and TT were 79.7%, 20.3%, and 0%, respectively, and among the victims of SCD 83.7%, 16.3%, and 0%, respectively. No significant differences in the genotype or allele distributions were observed between the study groups. CONCLUSION: The -1C to T polymorphism in the ANV gene is not associated with the risk of AMI or SCD in middle-aged Finnish males.
PubMed ID
16025836 View in PubMed
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The 1% of the population accountable for 63% of all violent crime convictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259131
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Falk, O
Wallinius, M
Lundström, S
Frisell, T
Anckarsäter, H
Kerekes, N
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Population-based studies on violent crime and background factors may provide an understanding of the relationships between susceptibility factors and crime. We aimed to determine the distribution of violent crime convictions in the Swedish population 1973-2004 and to identify criminal, academic, parental, and psychiatric risk factors for persistence in violent crime.
The nationwide multi-generation register was used with many other linked nationwide registers to select participants. All individuals born in 1958-1980 (2,393,765 individuals) were included. Persistent violent offenders (those with a lifetime history of three or more violent crime convictions) were compared with individuals having one or two such convictions, and to matched non-offenders. Independent variables were gender, age of first conviction for a violent crime, nonviolent crime convictions, and diagnoses for major mental disorders, personality disorders, and substance use disorders.
A total of 93,642 individuals (3.9%) had at least one violent conviction. The distribution of convictions was highly skewed; 24,342 persistent violent offenders (1.0% of the total population) accounted for 63.2% of all convictions. Persistence in violence was associated with male sex (OR 2.5), personality disorder (OR 2.3), violent crime conviction before age 19 (OR 2.0), drug-related offenses (OR 1.9), nonviolent criminality (OR 1.9), substance use disorder (OR 1.9), and major mental disorder (OR 1.3).
The majority of violent crimes are perpetrated by a small number of persistent violent offenders, typically males, characterized by early onset of violent criminality, substance abuse, personality disorders, and nonviolent criminality.
Notes
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Cites: Arch Sex Behav. 2010 Oct;39(5):1161-919888644
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Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 May;57(5):494-50010807490
PubMed ID
24173408 View in PubMed
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The 1st Annual Awards for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182022
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2002 Dec;7(2-3):1, 20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Thomas Kerr
Thomas Haig
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2002 Dec;7(2-3):1, 20-3
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Canada
HIV Infections
Human Rights
Humans
Physicians
Abstract
The 1st Annual Awards for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights were awarded to the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users and to Dr. Wan Yanhai, a Chinese physician and activist. The international attention and media coverage of the awards was heightened by the fact that the Chinese government had detained Dr. Wan for disclosing information about unsanitary blood collection practices in Henan province. An international outcry led to Dr. Wan's release on 20 September 2002.
PubMed ID
14719485 View in PubMed
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1st Canadian conference on hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191313
Source
Can Nurse. 2001 Aug;97(7):14-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-2001

The 1st step: a personal health-care planner from the Canadian Cancer Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229611
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Jamieson
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Voluntary Health Agencies
PubMed ID
2376807 View in PubMed
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A 1-year community-based health economic study of ciprofloxacin vs usual antibiotic treatment in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis: the Canadian Ciprofloxacin Health Economic Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206818
Source
Chest. 1998 Jan;113(1):131-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
R. Grossman
J. Mukherjee
D. Vaughan
C. Eastwood
R. Cook
J. LaForge
N. Lampron
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON.
Source
Chest. 1998 Jan;113(1):131-41
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Infective Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Bronchitis - drug therapy - economics
Canada
Chronic Disease
Ciprofloxacin - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Recurrence
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the costs, consequences, effectiveness, and safety of ciprofloxacin vs standard antibiotic care in patients with an initial acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB) as well as recurrent AECBs over a 1-year period.
Randomized, multicenter, parallel-group, open-label study.
Outpatient general practice.
A total of 240 patients, 18 years or older with chronic bronchitis, with a history of frequent exacerbations (three or more in the past year) presenting with a type 1 or 2 AECB (two or more of increased dyspnea, increased sputum volume, or sputum purulence).
The assessment included AECB symptoms, antibiotics prescribed, concomitant medications, adverse events, hospitalizations, emergency department visits, outpatient resources such as diagnostic tests, procedures, and patient and caregiver out-of-pocket expenses. Patients completed the Nottingham Health Profile, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, and the Health Utilities Index. The parameters were recorded with each AECB and at regular quarterly intervals for 1 year. These variables were compared between the ciprofloxacin-treated group and the usual-care-treated group.
Patients receiving ciprofloxacin experienced a median of two AECBs per patient compared to a median of three AECBs per patient receiving usual care. The mean annualized total number of AECB-symptom days was 42.9+/-2.8 in the ciprofloxacin arm compared to 45.6+/-3.0 days in the usual-care arm (p=0.50). The overall duration of the average AECB was 15.2+/-0.6 days for the ciprofloxacin arm compared to 16.3+/-0.6 days for the usual-care arm. Treatment with ciprofloxacin tended to accelerate the resolution of all AECBs compared to usual care (relative risk=1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91 to 1.58; p=0.19). Treatment assignment did not affect the interexacerbation period but a history of severe bronchitis, prolonged chronic bronchitis, and an increased number of AECBs in the past year were associated with shorter exacerbations-free periods. There was a slight, but not statistically significant, improvement in all quality of life measures with ciprofloxacin over usual care. The only factors predictive of hospitalization were duration of chronic bronchitis (odds ratio=4.6; 95% CI, 1.6, 13.0) and severity of chronic bronchitis (odds ratio=4.3; 95% CI, 0.8, 24.6). The incremental cost difference of $578 Canadian in favor of usual care was not significant (95% CI, -$778, $1,932). The cost for the ciprofloxacin arm over the usual care arm was $18,588 Canadian per quality-adjusted life year gained. When the simple base case analysis was expanded to examine the effect of risk stratification, the presence of moderate or severe bronchitis and at least four AECBs in the previous year changed the economic and clinical analysis to one favorable to ciprofloxacin with the ciprofloxacin-treated group having a better clinical outcome at lower cost ("win-win" scenario).
Treatment with ciprofloxacin tended to accelerate the resolution of all AECBs compared to usual care; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Further, usual care was found to be more reflective of best available care rather than usual first-line agents such as amoxicillin, tetracycline, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole as originally expected. Despite the similar antimicrobial activities and broad-spectrum coverage of both ciprofloxacin and usual care, the trends in clinical outcomes and all quality of life measurements favor ciprofloxacin. In patients suffering from an AECB with a history of moderate to severe chronic bronchitis and at least four AECBs in the previous year, ciprofloxacin treatment offered substantial clinical and economic benefits. In these patients, ciprofloxacin may be the preferred first antimicrobial choice.
PubMed ID
9440580 View in PubMed
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62235 records – page 1 of 6224.