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A 12-year National Study of Suicide by Jumping From Bridges in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293093
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Aleksandra Sæheim
Ingebjørg Hestetun
Erlend Mork
Latha Nrugham
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies from several countries suggest that erecting fences on bridges more commonly used for suicide by jumping may be an effective way of reducing the risk of suicide by jumping from these bridges. Distribution of suicides by jumping off bridges has not yet been studied on a national level in any country. This study included all suicides by jumping from high places registered in the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry (COD) in the period 1999-2010 (n = 319). Combining data from the COD registry and information from police records, 71 cases of suicide by jumping off a bridge were identified involving 36 bridges. This form of suicide constituted approximately 1% of all suicides in Norway in the period 1999-2010. Almost half of these suicides were registered at only 6 bridges. Three Norwegian bridges were secured during the observation period of this study. Two bridges had barriers installed on the full length of the bridge with 11 suicides registered before barriers were installed, and none after. On the 1 bridge that was only partially secured, no change in numbers of suicides was observed after barriers were installed. One-third of jumps from bridges occurred over land. We found that although suicide by jumping off bridges was a relatively rare event, there is a potential for saving lives by installing physical barriers on bridges that are more commonly used for suicide by jumping.
PubMed ID
27309998 View in PubMed
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18F FDG-PET/CT evaluation of histological response after neoadjuvant treatment in patients with cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299743
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-2019
Author
Stefan Gabrielson
Alejandro Sanchez-Crespo
Fredrik Klevebro
Rimma Axelsson
Jon Albert Tsai
Ove Johansson
Magnus Nilsson
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Esophageal Neoplasms - therapy
Esophagogastric Junction - diagnostic imaging
Esophagus - diagnostic imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Norway
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals
Sweden
Abstract
In most parts of the world, curatively intended treatment for esophageal cancer includes neoadjuvant therapy, either with chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy alone, followed by esophagectomy. Currently 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for preoperative disease staging, but is not well established in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment.
To evaluate changes in PET parameters in relation to the histological primary tumor response in the surgical specimen in patients randomized to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy.
Patients were randomized between either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy.18F-FDG PET/CT exams were conducted at baseline and following neoadjuvant treatment. Standardized uptake ratio (SUR) values were measured in the primary tumor and compared as regards histological responders and non-responders as well as different treatment arms.
Seventy-nine patients were enrolled and 51 were available for analysis. A significant rate of SUR reduction was observed ( P?=?0.02) in the primary tumor in histological responders compared to non-responders. Changes in SUR were significantly greater in responders following chemoradiotherapy ( P?=?0.02), but not following chemotherapy alone ( P?=?0.49). There was no statistically significant difference in SUR in patients with a complete histological response compared to those with a subtotal response.
Our results are similar to those of previous studies and show that changes in the rate of SUR can be used reliably to differentiate histological responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant treatment with either chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Limitations of current PET technology are likely to restrict the possibility of accurately ruling out limited residual disease.
PubMed ID
30111193 View in PubMed
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"A bumpy road": Kindergarten staff's experiences with an intervention to promote healthy diets in toddlers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301624
Source
Appetite. 2018 08 01; 127:37-43
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2018
Author
Berit Johannessen
Sissel H Helland
Elling Bere
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Liv Fegran
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. Electronic address: berit.johannessen@uia.no.
Source
Appetite. 2018 08 01; 127:37-43
Date
08-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cooking
Faculty
Feeding Behavior
Food Preferences
Health promotion
Healthy Diet
Humans
Norway
Schools
Abstract
This study explores the experiences of kindergarten staff with a multi-component kindergarten-based intervention, the aims of which were to reduce levels of food neophobia and to promote healthy diets in toddlers (aged 2-3 years). A qualitative design was chosen for the study, and the data are based on three focus group interviews. Altogether, 15 kindergarten staff were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The focus group interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Five main themes emerged from the interviews: i) Successful development of sensory knowledge, ii) Food neophobia, iii) Implementing new routines, a challenge for some, iv) Lack of cooking skills, and v) Inspired to continue. A main finding was that all kindergarten staff perceived the sensory education sessions as successful and reported that both toddlers and staff expanded their food vocabulary and increased their attention to sensory impressions of food. However, the staff reported that some toddlers were less willing to taste new lunch dishes than to taste new foods in the sensory education sessions. The staff also noted that the guidelines for feeding practices resulted in unfamiliar situations at the lunch table. The staff agreed that cooking novel foods was time consuming and left less time for other tasks. Finally, all kindergarten staff expressed that they would like to continue with portions of the food intervention. Our main interpretation is that the intervention presented several challenges, especially regarding cooking and feeding practices. If kindergartens are to be a place to promote healthy eating habits in the early years, sufficient time and resources for cooking seem to be needed and food and feeding practices included in the curriculum of kindergartens and higher education for kindergarten teachers.
ISRCTN74823448.
PubMed ID
29704540 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy preceded by an experimental Attention Bias Modification procedure in recurrent depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299363
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-27-2018
Author
Tom Østergaard
Tobias Lundgren
Robert Zettle
Rune Jonassen
Catherine J Harmer
Tore C Stiles
Nils Inge Landrø
Vegard Øksendal Haaland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sørlandet Hospital, Arendal, Norway. tom.ostergaard@sshf.no.
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Date
Mar-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attentional Bias
Depression - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Remission Induction
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This project studies the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) following Attention Bias Modification (ABM) on residual symptoms in recurrent depression. ACT is a cognitive-behavioral intervention combining acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior-change processes. ACT enjoys modest empirical support in treating depression and has also shown promising results in secondary prevention of depression. The experimental cognitive bias modification (ABM) procedure has been shown to reduce surrogate markers of depression vulnerability in patients in remission from depression. The aim of the current project is to investigate if the effect of group-based ACT on reducing residual depressive symptoms can be enhanced by preceding it with ABM. Also, assessment of the relationship between conceptually relevant therapeutic processes and outcome will be investigated.
An invitation to participate in this project was extended to 120 individuals within a larger sample who had just completed a separate randomized, multisite, clinical trial (referred to hereafter as Phase 1) in which they received either ABM (n = 60) or a control condition without bias modification (n = 60). This larger Phase-1 sample consisted of 220 persons with a history of at least two episodes of major depression who were currently in remission or not fulfilling the criteria of major depression. After its inclusion, Phase-1 participants from the Sørlandet site (n = 120) were also recruited for this study in which they received an 8-week group-based ACT intervention. Measures will be taken immediately after Phase 1, 1 month, 2 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the conclusion of Phase 1.
This study sequentially combines acceptable, nondrug interventions from neuropsychology and cognitive-behavioral psychology in treating residual symptoms in depression. The results will provide information about the effectiveness of treatment and on mechanisms and processes of change that may be valuable in understanding and further developing ABM and ACT, combined and alone.
ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02648165 . Registered on 6 January 2016.
PubMed ID
29587807 View in PubMed
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Accounting for structural and exchange mobility in models of status attainment: Social fluidity in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294359
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
01-2017
Author
Jorge Rodríguez Menés
Author Affiliation
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain. Electronic address: jorge.rodriguez@upf.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Father-Child Relations
Fathers
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Abstract
This paper proposes a new method to distinguish structural from exchange mobility in status attainment models with interval endogenous variables. In order to measure structural mobility, the paper proposes to trace occupational and educational changes across generations using information provided by children about their fathers. The validity of the method is assessed by comparing the effects of father's socio-economic status and education on son's status and educational attainments, net of occupational upgrading and educational expansion, in five European countries: Britain, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Spain, using data from the 2005 EU-SILC survey. The results show that the effect of father's on son's ISEI weakens greatly in all countries after considering occupational upgrading, and that much of father's influence over sons occurs by directing them towards occupations with good economic prospects. Useful extensions to the method are discussed in the conclusions.
PubMed ID
27886723 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of genomic selection for growth and wood quality traits in two control-pollinated progeny trials using exome capture as the genotyping platform in Norway spruce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299456
Source
BMC Genomics. 2018 Dec 18; 19(1):946
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-18-2018
Author
Zhi-Qiang Chen
John Baison
Jin Pan
Bo Karlsson
Bengt Andersson
Johan Westin
María Rosario García-Gil
Harry X Wu
Author Affiliation
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-90183, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
BMC Genomics. 2018 Dec 18; 19(1):946
Date
Dec-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Exome
Genetic markers
Genomics - methods
Genotype
Models, Genetic
Models, Statistical
Norway
Phenotype
Picea - genetics - growth & development
Plant Breeding
Pollination
Selection, Genetic
Wood - chemistry - genetics
Abstract
Genomic selection (GS) can increase genetic gain by reducing the length of breeding cycle in forest trees. Here we genotyped 1370 control-pollinated progeny trees from 128 full-sib families in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), using exome capture as genotyping platform. We used 116,765 high-quality SNPs to develop genomic prediction models for tree height and wood quality traits. We assessed the impact of different genomic prediction methods, genotype-by-environment interaction (G?×?E), genetic composition, size of the training and validation set, relatedness, and number of SNPs on accuracy and predictive ability (PA) of GS.
Using G matrix slightly altered heritability estimates relative to pedigree-based method. GS accuracies were about 11-14% lower than those based on pedigree-based selection. The efficiency of GS per year varied from 1.71 to 1.78, compared to that of the pedigree-based model if breeding cycle length was halved using GS. Height GS accuracy decreased to more than 30% while using one site as training for GS prediction and using this model to predict the second site, indicating that G?×?E for tree height should be accommodated in model fitting. Using a half-sib family structure instead of full-sib structure led to a significant reduction in GS accuracy and PA. The full-sib family structure needed only 750 markers to reach similar accuracy and PA, as compared to 100,000 markers required for the half-sib family, indicating that maintaining the high relatedness in the model improves accuracy and PA. Using 4000-8000 markers in full-sib family structure was sufficient to obtain GS model accuracy and PA for tree height and wood quality traits, almost equivalent to that obtained with all markers.
The study indicates that GS would be efficient in reducing generation time of breeding cycle in conifer tree breeding program that requires long-term progeny testing. The sufficient number of trees within-family (16 for growth and 12 for wood quality traits) and number of SNPs (8000) are required for GS with full-sib family relationship. GS methods had little impact on GS efficiency for growth and wood quality traits. GS model should incorporate G?×?E effect when a strong G?×?E is detected.
PubMed ID
30563448 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease. The HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301152
Source
J Neurol. 2018 Sep; 265(9):2120-2124
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Eldbjørg Hustad
Anne Heidi Skogholt
Kristian Hveem
Jan O Aasly
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Molde Hospital, Møre and Romsdal Hospital Trust, Molde, Norway. Eldbjorh@stud.ntnu.no.
Source
J Neurol. 2018 Sep; 265(9):2120-2124
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Errors
Electronic Health Records
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Norway
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis
Parkinson Disease, Secondary - diagnosis
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Abstract
Diagnostic accuracy is crucial not only for prognostic and therapeutic reasons, but also for epidemiologic studies. We aimed to study the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) for participants in The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), a health survey, containing data from approximately 126,000 individuals and biological material from 80,000 individuals. We included 980 participants from the HUNT study diagnosed with PD or secondary parkinsonism/related parkinsonian disorders. The participants had been diagnosed in conjunction with admission to hospitals in Trøndelag or through out-patient examination. We validated the diagnosis of PD by reviewing available Electronic Health Records (EHRs) using the MDS Clinical Diagnostic Criteria as gold standard. In total 61% (601/980) of the participants had available EHRs and were selected for validation. Out of those, 92% (550/601) had been diagnosed with PD while 8% (51/601) had been diagnosed with secondary parkinsonism/related parkinsonian disorders. The main outcome measure was the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of PD for participants in the HUNT study. We verified PD in 65% (358/550) and excluded PD in 35% (192/550) of the participants. According to our results, the overall quality of the clinical diagnosis of PD for participants in the HUNT study is not optimal. Quality assurance of ICD codes entered into health registers is crucial before biological material obtained from these populations can be used in the search of new biomarkers for PD.
PubMed ID
29992351 View in PubMed
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Acquired equine polyneuropathy of Nordic horses: A conspicuous inclusion body schwannopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292620
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2017 Oct; 27(10):931-941
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
S Hanche-Olsen
K Matiasek
J Molín
M Rosati
C Hahn
K Hultin Jäderlund
G Gröndahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ullevålsvn 72, 0454 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: siv.hanche-olsen@nmbu.no.
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2017 Oct; 27(10):931-941
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Horse Diseases - pathology
Horses
Male
Muscles - pathology
Norway
Polyneuropathies - etiology - pathology - veterinary
Schwann Cells - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
Acquired equine polyneuropathy (AEP), formerly also known as Scandinavian knuckling syndrome, is one of the most prevalent polyneuropathies in equids in Norway and Sweden, with more than 400 cases registered since first observations in 1995. Despite geographical clustering and an association to forage feeding, its aetiology remains unknown. Clinically AEP is characterized by knuckling due to dysfunction of metatarsophalangeal extensor muscles. This neuropathological study aimed to gain further insights in the pathobiology of AEP and its underlying aetiopathogenesis. We thereby confirmed that all affected horses suffered from similar large fibre neuropathy, exhibiting conspicuous Schwann cell inclusions in most samples, suggestive of a primary disruption of Schwann cell metabolism leading to inclusion body schwannopathy with secondary inflammatory changes. The degree of nerve pathology was not predictive of clinical outcome.
PubMed ID
28694072 View in PubMed
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Acquisition of locative utterances in Norwegian: structure-building via lexical learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299505
Source
J Child Lang. 2018 07; 45(4):981-1005
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Natalia Mitrofanova
Marit Westergaard
Author Affiliation
UiT - The Arctic University of Norway,Norway.
Source
J Child Lang. 2018 07; 45(4):981-1005
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Language
Language Development
Learning
Male
Norway
Phonetics
Russia
Semantics
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper focuses on the acquisition of locative prepositional phrases in L1 Norwegian. We report on two production experiments with children acquiring Norwegian as their first language and compare the results to similar experiments conducted with Russian children. The results of the experiments show that Norwegian children at age 2 regularly produce locative utterances lacking overt prepositions, with the rate of preposition omission decreasing significantly by age 3. Furthermore, our results suggest that phonologically strong and semantically unambiguous locative items appear earlier in Norwegian children's utterances than their phonologically weak and semantically ambiguous counterparts. This conclusion is confirmed by a corpus study. We argue that our results are best captured by the Underspecified P Hypothesis (UPH; Mitrofanova, 2017), which assumes that, at early stages of grammatical development, the underlying structure of locative utterances is underspecified, with more complex functional representations emerging gradually based on the input. This approach predicts that the rate of acquisition in the domain of locative PPs should be influenced by the lexical properties of individual language-specific grammatical elements (such as frequency, morphological complexity, phonological salience, or semantic ambiguity). Our data from child Norwegian show that this prediction is borne out. Specifically, the results of our study suggest that phonologically more salient and semantically unambiguous items are mastered earlier than their ambiguous and phonologically less salient counterparts, despite the higher frequency of the latter in the input (Clahsen et al., 1996).
PubMed ID
29540246 View in PubMed
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Acting on audit & feedback: a qualitative instrumental case study in mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295007
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-31-2018
Author
Monica Stolt Pedersen
Anne Landheim
Merete Møller
Lars Lien
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Concurrent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.B. 104, 2340, Brumunddal, Norway. monica.stolt.pedersen@sykehuset-innlandet.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Date
01-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Benchmarking
Evidence-Based Practice
Feedback
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Abstract
The National Guideline for Assessment, Treatment and Social Rehabilitation of Persons with Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders, launched in 2012, is to be implemented in mental health services in Norway. Audit and feedback (A&F) is commonly used as the starting point of an implementation process. It aims to measure the research-practice gap, but its effect varies greatly. Less is known of how audit and feedback is used in natural settings. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate what is discussed and thematised when Quality Improvement (QI) teams in a District Psychiatric Centre (DPC) work to complete an action form as part of an A&F cycle in 2014.
This was an instrumental multiple case study involving four units in a DPC in Norway. We used open non-participant observation of QI team meetings in their natural setting, a total of seven teams and eleven meetings.
The discussions provided health professionals with insight into their own and their colleagues' practices. They revealed insufficient knowledge of substance-related disorders and experienced unclear role expectations. We found differences in how professional groups sought answers to questions of clinical practice and that they were concerned about whether new tasks fitted in with their routine ways of working.
Acting on A&F provided an opportunity to discuss practice in general, enhancing awareness of good practice. There was a general need for arenas to relate to practice and QI team meetings after A&F may well be a suitable arena for this. Self-assessment audits seem valuable, particular in areas where no benchmarked data exists, and there is a demand for implementation of new guidelines that might change routines and develop new roles. QI teams could benefit from having a unit leader present at meetings. Nurses and social educators and others turn to psychiatrists or psychologists for answers to clinical and organisational questions beyond guidelines, and show less confidence or routine in seeking research-based information. There is a general need to emphasise training in evidence-based practice and information seeking behaviour for all professional groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29386020 View in PubMed
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1220 records – page 1 of 122.