Skip header and navigation

Refine By

149 records – page 1 of 15.

Adiposity and the isotemporal substitution of physical activity, sedentary time and sleep among school-aged children: a compositional data analysis approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292190
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 03 02; 18(1):311
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-02-2018
Author
Dorothea Dumuid
Tyman E Stanford
Željko Pedišic
Carol Maher
Lucy K Lewis
Josep-Antoni Martín-Fernández
Peter T Katzmarzyk
Jean-Philippe Chaput
Mikael Fogelholm
Martyn Standage
Mark S Tremblay
Timothy Olds
Author Affiliation
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, SA, 5001, Australia. dorothea.dumuid@mymail.unisa.edu.au.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 03 02; 18(1):311
Date
03-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Australia
Canada
Child
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Pediatric Obesity
Sedentary lifestyle
Sleep
Time Factors
United Kingdom
Abstract
Daily activity data are by nature compositional data. Accordingly, they occupy a specific geometry with unique properties that is different to standard Euclidean geometry. This study aimed to estimate the difference in adiposity associated with isotemporal reallocation between daily activity behaviours, and to compare the findings from compositional isotemporal subsitution to those obtained from traditional isotemporal substitution.
We estimated the differences in adiposity (body fat%) associated with reallocating fixed durations of time (isotemporal substitution) between accelerometer-measured daily activity behaviours (sleep, sedentary time and light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) among 1728 children aged 9-11 years from Australia, Canada, Finland and the UK (International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment, 2011-2013). We generated estimates from compositional isotemporal substitution models and traditional non-compositional isotemporal substitution models.
Both compositional and traditional models estimated a positive (unfavourable) difference in body fat% when time was reallocated from MVPA to any other behaviour. Unlike traditional models, compositional models found the differences in estimated adiposity (1) were not necessarily symmetrical when an activity was being displaced, or displacing another (2) were not linearly related to the durations of time reallocated, and (3) varied depending on the starting composition.
The compositional isotemporal model caters for the constrained and therefore relative nature of activity behaviour data and enables all daily behaviours to be included in a single statistical model. The traditional model treats data as real variables, thus the constrained nature of time is not accounted for, nor reflected in the findings. Findings from compositional isotemporal substitution support the importance of MVPA to children's health, and suggest that while interventions to increase MVPA may be of benefit, attention should be directed towards strategies to avoid decline in MVPA levels, particularly among already inactive children. Future applications of the compositional model can extend from pair-wise reallocations to other configurations of time-reallocation, for example, increasing MVPA at the expense of multiple other behaviours.
Notes
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015 Feb 11;12:11 PMID 25881074
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Aug 15;170(4):519-27 PMID 19584129
Cites: Circulation. 2011 Aug 16;124(7):789-95 PMID 21810663
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 May 10;14 (1):64 PMID 28486972
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jul;34(7):1177-87 PMID 20351728
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Oct 13;10(10):e0139984 PMID 26461112
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Sep;85(9):660-7 PMID 18026621
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2008 Oct;100(4):859-65 PMID 18346304
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 2017 Jan 1;:962280217737805 PMID 29157152
Cites: J Obes. 2012;2012:852672 PMID 22811890
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 Jun;41(6 Suppl 3):S240-65 PMID 27306432
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2014 Jan;39(1):53-7 PMID 24383507
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007 Jan 31;7:16 PMID 17266745
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):e29-32 PMID 23239610
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 Jun;41(6 Suppl 3):S294-302 PMID 27306435
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;80(1):64-9 PMID 15213029
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2017 Nov;62(8):929-938 PMID 28593331
Cites: Int J Obes Suppl. 2015 Dec;5(Suppl 2):S9-S16 PMID 27152192
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Feb;16(2):275-84 PMID 18239633
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 Jun;41(6 Suppl 3):S266-82 PMID 27306433
Cites: Med J Aust. 2007 Jun 4;186(11):591-5 PMID 17547550
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2015 May;47(5):937-43 PMID 25202840
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 Sep 30;13:900 PMID 24079373
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 Jun;41(6 Suppl 3):S197-239 PMID 27306431
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 2017 Jan 1;:962280217710835 PMID 28555522
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Feb 1;273(5):402-7 PMID 7823386
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jul;43(7):1360-8 PMID 21131873
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 May 17;11(5):e0154935 PMID 27187777
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2018 Feb;13(2):111-119 PMID 28027427
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2008 Dec;26(14):1557-65 PMID 18949660
PubMed ID
29499689 View in PubMed
Less detail

An Ecological and Human Biomonitoring Investigation of Mercury Contamination at the Aamjiwnaang First Nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289980
Source
Ecohealth. 2016 12; 13(4):784-795
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2016
Author
Diana Cryderman
Lisa Letourneau
Fiona Miller
Niladri Basu
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
Source
Ecohealth. 2016 12; 13(4):784-795
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollution
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
The Aamjiwnaang First Nations community is located in Canada's 'Chemical Valley' situated in southwest Ontario near Sarnia. Mercury pollution in the region has been known since the 1940s but little is known about levels in the environment and area residents. The current study, using ecological and human exposure assessment methods, was conducted at the community's request to help fill these gaps. First, Canada's National Pollutant Release Inventory and the U.S. Toxics Release Inventory were queried to investigate mercury releases from area facilities. In 2010, 700 pounds of mercury were emitted into the air, 25 pounds were released into water bodies, and 93 thousand pounds were disposed of on-site via underground injections or into landfills, and together these show continued releases into the region. Second, mercury levels were measured in stream sediment and nearby soil from sites at Aamjiwnaang (n = 4) and off Reserve (n = 19) in Canada and the U.S. during three seasons that spanned 2010-2011. Total mercury in sediment across all sites and sampling seasons ranged from 5.0 to 398.7 µg/kg, and in soils ranged from 1.2 to 696.2 µg/kg. Sediment and soil mercury levels at Aamjiwnaang were higher than the reference community, and Aamjiwnaang's Talfourd Creek site had the highest mercury levels. Third, a biomonitoring study was performed with 43 mother-child pairs. Hair (mean ± SD of all participants: 0.18 ± 0.16 µg/g) and blood (1.6 ± 2.0 µg/L) mercury levels did not differ between participants studied on- and off-Reserve, likely because of limited seafood intake (
Notes
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2004 Feb;77(2):97-107 PMID 14658069
Cites: Chem Cent J. 2011 Jan 13;5(1):3 PMID 21232132
Cites: J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2016 Jan-Feb;26(1):78-85 PMID 26329138
Cites: Environ Res. 2014 Nov;135:63-9 PMID 25262076
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Sep 01;12(9):10755-82 PMID 26340636
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Apr;105(4):424-9 PMID 9189708
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Apr;100:31-8 PMID 8354179
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Aug;112(11):1165-71 PMID 15289161
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Sep 1;368(1):335-43 PMID 16253310
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):28-31 PMID 20364534
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Dec 1;409(1):70-7 PMID 20952048
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 1996;16:417-42 PMID 8839933
Cites: Risk Anal. 1997 Dec;17(6):789-95 PMID 9463932
PubMed ID
27645755 View in PubMed
Less detail

An International Comparison of Death Classification at 22 to 25 Weeks' Gestational Age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299751
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 07; 142(1):
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Lucy K Smith
Naho Morisaki
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Mika Gissler
Paromita Deb-Rinker
Jocelyn Rouleau
Stellan Hakansson
Michael R Kramer
Michael S Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 07; 142(1):
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Canada
Female
Fetal Death
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Japan
Norway
Pregnancy
Registries
Survival Rate
Sweden
United Kingdom
United States
Abstract
To explore international differences in the classification of births at extremely low gestation and the subsequent impact on the calculation of survival rates.
We used national data on births at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation from the United States (2014; n = 11?144), Canada (2009-2014; n = 5668), the United Kingdom (2014-2015; n = 2992), Norway (2010-2014; n = 409), Finland (2010-2015; n = 348), Sweden (2011-2014; n = 489), and Japan (2014-2015; n = 2288) to compare neonatal survival rates using different denominators: all births, births alive at the onset of labor, live births, live births surviving to 1 hour, and live births surviving to 24 hours.
For births at 22 weeks' gestation, neonatal survival rates for which we used live births as the denominator varied from 3.7% to 56.7% among the 7 countries. This variation decreased when the denominator was changed to include stillbirths (ie, all births [1.8%-22.3%] and fetuses alive at the onset of labor [3.7%-38.2%]) or exclude early deaths and limited to births surviving at least 12 hours (50.0%-77.8%). Similar trends were seen for infants born at 23 weeks' gestation. Variation diminished considerably at 24 and 25 weeks' gestation.
International variation in neonatal survival rates at 22 to 23 weeks' gestation diminished considerably when including stillbirths in the denominator, revealing the variation arises in part from differences in the proportion of births reported as live births, which itself is closely connected to the provision of active care.
PubMed ID
29899042 View in PubMed
Less detail

An Inverse Problem: Trappers Drove Hares to Eat Lynx.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296081
Source
Acta Biotheor. 2018 Sep; 66(3):213-242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Bo Deng
Author Affiliation
Mathematics and Science College, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, 200234, China. bdeng@math.unl.edu.
Source
Acta Biotheor. 2018 Sep; 66(3):213-242
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Animals
Canada
Ecology
Ecosystem
Female
Hares - physiology
Lynx - physiology
Male
Models, Biological
Models, Statistical
Population Dynamics
Predatory Behavior
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare pelt data by the Hudson Bay Company did not fit the classical predator-prey theory. Rather than following the peak density of the hare, that of the lynx leads it, creating the hares-eat-lynx (HEL) paradox. Although trappers were suspected to play a role, no mathematical model has ever demonstrated the HEL effect. Here we show that the long-held assumption that the pelt number is a proxy of the wild populations is false and that when the data are modeled by the harvest rates by the trappers, the problem is finally resolved: both the HEL paradox and the classical theory are unified in our mechanistic hare-lynx-competitor-trapper (HLCT) model where competitor stands for all predators of the hares other than the lynx. The result is obtained by systematically fitting the data to various models using Newton's inverse problem method. Main findings of this study include: the prey-eats-predator paradox in kills by an intraguild top-predator can occur if the top-predator prefers the predator to the prey; the benchmark HLCT model is more sensitive to all lynx-trapper interactions than to the respective hare-trapper interactions; the Hudson Bay Company's hare pelt number maybe under-reported; and, the most intriguing of all, the trappers did not interfere in each other's trapping activities.
PubMed ID
29846858 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anti-apoptotic potential of several antidiabetic medicinal plants of the eastern James Bay Cree pharmacopeia in cultured kidney cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290206
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Jan 30; 18(1):37
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-30-2018
Author
Shilin Li
Sarah Pasquin
Hoda M Eid
Jean-François Gauchat
Ammar Saleem
Pierre S Haddad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Downtown Postal Station, Montreal, (Quebec), H3C 3J7, Canada.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Jan 30; 18(1):37
Date
Jan-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Annexin A5 - chemistry
Apoptosis - drug effects
Canada
Caspases - metabolism
Diabetic Nephropathies - metabolism
Dogs
Hypoglycemic Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Medicine, Traditional
Plant Extracts - chemistry - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Propidium - chemistry
Protective Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Abstract
Our team has identified 17 Boreal forest species from the traditional pharmacopeia of the Eastern James Bay Cree that presented promising in vitro and in vivo biological activities in the context of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We now screened the 17 plants extracts for potential anti-apoptotic activity in cultured kidney cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms.
MDCK (Madin-Darnby Canine Kidney) cell damage was induced by hypertonic medium (700 mOsm/L) in the presence or absence of maximal nontoxic concentrations of each of the 17 plant extracts. After 18 h' treatment, cells were stained with Annexin V (AnnV) and Propidium iodide (PI) and subjected to flow cytometry to assess the cytoprotective (AnnV-/PI-) and anti-apoptotic (AnnV+/PI-) potential of the 17 plant extracts. We then selected a representative subset of species (most cytoprotective, moderately so or neutral) to measure the activity of caspases 3, 8 and 9.
Gaultheria hispidula and Abies balsamea are amongst the most powerful cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic plants and appear to exert their modulatory effect primarily by inhibiting caspase 9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway.
We conclude that several Cree antidiabetic plants exert anti-apoptotic activity that may be relevant in the context of diabetic nephropathy (DN) that affects a significant proportion of Cree diabetics.
Notes
Cites: Diabet Med. 1997;14 Suppl 5:S1-85 PMID 9450510
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2016 Apr;55(3):941-54 PMID 25916863
Cites: Invest Radiol. 2002 Aug;37(8):428-34 PMID 12138358
Cites: Phytochemistry. 2004 Jan;65(2):207-13 PMID 14732280
Cites: World J Diabetes. 2013 Apr 15;4(2):27-30 PMID 23593533
Cites: J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Feb 3;178:251-7 PMID 26707751
Cites: Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2006 Aug-Sep;84(8-9):847-58 PMID 17111029
Cites: J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 14;141(3):1051-7 PMID 22542642
Cites: Kidney Int. 2001 Aug;60(2):553-67 PMID 11473638
Cites: Acta Histochem. 2001 Jul;103(3):241-51 PMID 11482370
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012 Dec 05;12:245 PMID 23216659
Cites: J Math Biol. 2014 Feb;68(3):609-45 PMID 23358701
Cites: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;9(12):713-23 PMID 24100266
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1998 Sep;21(9):1414-31 PMID 9727886
Cites: Am J Nephrol. 2005 Mar-Apr;25(2):121-31 PMID 15812145
Cites: Phytochem Anal. 2010 Jul-Aug;21(4):328-39 PMID 20135709
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 May;27(5):1047-53 PMID 15111519
Cites: Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1993 Sep;41(9):1604-7 PMID 8221975
Cites: Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1990 Jul;19(4):506-11 PMID 2221810
Cites: Cell. 1996 Oct 18;87(2):171 PMID 8861900
Cites: Mol Cell Biochem. 2004 Apr;259(1-2):67-70 PMID 15124909
Cites: Planta Med. 2004 May;70(5):471-4 PMID 15124097
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Aug 12;321(7258):412-9 PMID 10938049
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2002 Jun;13(6):1455-63 PMID 12039974
Cites: Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2007 Nov;85(11):1200-14 PMID 18066122
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Oct 7;341(15):1127-33 PMID 10511612
Cites: Nature. 2000 Oct 12;407(6805):770-6 PMID 11048727
Cites: Pharm Biol. 2016 Oct;54(10 ):1998-2006 PMID 26916332
Cites: Toxicol In Vitro. 1995 Oct;9(5):765-72 PMID 20650155
Cites: J Ethnopharmacol. 2010 Feb 3;127(2):396-406 PMID 19861154
Cites: J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Dec 24;194:651-657 PMID 27773798
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Aug 12;321(7258):405-12 PMID 10938048
Cites: J Reprod Dev. 2009 Dec;55(6):615-21 PMID 19734695
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Aug;28(8):2054-7 PMID 16043760
Cites: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015;2015:492458 PMID 26508979
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2001 Mar;16(3):483-90 PMID 11239020
Cites: Phytochemistry. 2001 Feb;56(4):359-61 PMID 11249101
Cites: Health Rep. 2008 Mar;19(1):21-35 PMID 18457209
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1962 Dec;14:353-62 PMID 13937884
Cites: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:189819 PMID 23864882
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Aug 11;10(8):e0135721 PMID 26263160
Cites: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:893426 PMID 22235232
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;21(4):610-21 PMID 20110383
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1993 Jan;16(1):157-77 PMID 8123057
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Mar;84(3):1077-82 PMID 10084598
Cites: Oncogene. 2003 Nov 24;22(53):8543-67 PMID 14634618
Cites: Cell Death Differ. 2009 Jul;16(7):935-8 PMID 19528949
Cites: Yakugaku Zasshi. 1964 May;84:453-7 PMID 14193916
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Sep 5;163(5):561-6 PMID 11006768
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1990;10 Suppl 1:S17-27 PMID 2286126
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 4;367(14):1332-40 PMID 23034021
Cites: Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2009 Jun;87(6):479-92 PMID 19526043
Cites: Phytochemistry. 2015 Sep;117:373-9 PMID 26164238
PubMed ID
29378549 View in PubMed
Less detail

An unusual case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae prosthetic joint infection from the Canadian Arctic: whole genome sequencing unable to identify a zoonotic source.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299701
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2019 Mar 25; 19(1):282
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Mar-25-2019
Author
Michael Groeschel
Taya Forde
Shannon Turvey
A Mark Joffe
Catherine Hui
Prenilla Naidu
Fabien Mavrot
Susan Kutz
Ameeta E Singh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. michael.groeschel@cls.ab.ca.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2019 Mar 25; 19(1):282
Date
Mar-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Animals, Wild - microbiology
Arctic Regions
Arthritis, Infectious - transmission
Canada
Erysipelothrix
Erysipelothrix Infections - microbiology - transmission
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - microbiology
Prosthesis-Related Infections - microbiology - transmission
Whole Genome Sequencing
Zoonoses - microbiology - transmission
Abstract
Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a zoonotic pathogen that causes erysipeloid and is most frequently associated with exposure to domestic swine. Infection of native and prosthetic joints is a rarely reported manifestation.
We describe a case of E. rhusiopathiae prosthetic joint infection in a woman with a history of exposure to wild animals in the Canadian Arctic. Patient management involved a 1-stage surgical revision exchange with an antibiotic impregnated cement spacer and 6 weeks of intravenous penicillin G followed by 6?weeks of oral amoxicillin. Ten previously reported cases of E. rhusiopathiae joint infection are reviewed. Recent increases in mortality due to infection with this organism among host animal populations in the Canadian Arctic have generated concern regarding a potential increase in human infections. However, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of the organism was unable to identify a zoonotic origin for this case.
Consideration should be given to E. rhusiopathiae as a cause of joint infections if the appropriate epidemiologic and host risk factors exist. Expanded use of WGS in other potential animal hosts and environmental sources may provide important epidemiologic information in determining the source of human infections.
PubMed ID
30909869 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are we really "eating well with Canada's food guide"?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301619
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 22; 18(1):652
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-22-2018
Author
Joyce J Slater
Adriana N Mudryj
Author Affiliation
Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, 409 Human Ecology Building, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 22; 18(1):652
Date
05-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthy Diet - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Nutrition Policy
Abstract
Canada's Food Guide (CFG) has been an important health promotion tool for over seventy years. The most recent version was released in 2007. This study examined Canadians' exposure to, knowledge, and use of CFG.
Data came from the Canadian Community Health Survey's Rapid Response on the Awareness and Usage of Canada's Food Guide, which included 10,098 Canadians =12 y in all ten provinces. Questions were asked on familiarity, awareness and usage of CFG and Canada's Food Guide for First Nations, Inuit and Métis, as well as healthy eating principles and behaviours. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to observe counts and differences among key demographic variables.
More than 80% of Canadians have heard of CFG however significantly more women than men were aware of the Guide. Most knew that 'Vegetables and Fruit' had the most recommended servings and that dark green vegetables should be consumed daily; however fewer than half knew this of orange vegetables. Just under one third had a copy in their homes, and the most common sources for obtaining CFG were child's school and health professional/trainer. Those who consulted CFG recently were more likely to consume the recommended servings of vegetables and fruits, and to state that their eating habits were 'much better' than one year previously.
CFG has "brand recognition" among Canadians however there are gaps between awareness and eating behaviours. The new Food Guide could consider additional dissemination tools including social media, videos and workbooks tailored to various age groups, demographic groups and settings.
PubMed ID
29788941 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arsenic mobility and characterization in lakes impacted by gold ore roasting, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292468
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Martin D Van Den Berghe
Heather E Jamieson
Michael J Palmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University, 36 Union St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, 3651 Trousdale Pkwy, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. Electronic address: mdvanden@usc.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenicals - analysis
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gold
Lakes - analysis
Mining
Oxides - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The controls on the mobility and fate of arsenic in lakes impacted by historical gold ore roasting in northern Canada have been examined. A detailed characterization of arsenic solid and aqueous phases in lake waters, lake sediments and sediment porewaters as well as surrounding soils was conducted in three small lakes (80 wt%) of arsenic is contained in the form of secondary sulphide precipitates, with iron oxy-hydroxides hosting a minimal amount of arsenic (
PubMed ID
29223820 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing clinical support and inter-professional interactions among front-line primary care providers in remote communities in northern Canada: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289293
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32159
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Stephanie K Young
T Kue Young
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32159
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Health Services Research
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Northwest Territories
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care - methods
Quality of Health Care
Rural health services - organization & administration
Rural Population
Abstract
Primary care in remote communities in northern Canada is delivered primarily by nurses who receive clinical support from physicians in regional centres and the patient transportation system. To improve continuity, quality and access to care in remote northern communities, it is important to understand the perspectives of front-line providers and the complex challenges they face.
To design and implement a survey of primary care providers to identify issues relating to inter-professional communication, clinical support and patient evacuation.
In collaboration with the territorial government and regional health authority partners, we developed a 21-item self-administered questionnaire survey, which could be completed online. The survey was sent to 218 physicians and nurses who were employed in the Northwest Territories (NWT) at the time of the survey and were involved in sending patients out of the community and/or receiving patients. The survey also contained an open-ended question at the end seeking comments regarding primary health care.
The overall low response rate of 39% among nurses and 19% among physicians threatens the validity of the quantitative results. The majority of providers were satisfied with their ability to communicate with other providers in a timely manner, their freedom to make clinical decisions and their overall experience practicing in the NWT. The patient transfer system appears to work from both the sender and receiver perspectives. However, a common theme reported by nurses was that physicians providing clinical advice, especially short-term locums, were not familiar with the local situation, whilst physicians at the receiving end remarked that the clinical information provided to them often lacked clarity.
Important lessons were learnt from the pilot study, especially in better engagement of providers in planning and dissemination. The questionnaire design and the online method of delivery were acceptable. Although important issues were identified, a larger definitive survey is needed to investigate them in the future.
Notes
Cites: Br J Nurs. 2000 Mar 9-22;9(5):276-80 PMID 11042783
Cites: Image J Nurs Sch. 1992 Summer;24(2):153-8 PMID 1601458
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2007 Jul-Sep;7(3):766 PMID 17650058
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jul;35(1):126-33; discussion 134-7 PMID 11442690
Cites: J Rural Health. 2011 Winter;27(1):103-13 PMID 21204977
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 14;74:27186 PMID 25979200
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1210-4 PMID 11706910
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2002 Nov;52(484):934-9 PMID 12434964
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2009 Sep-Oct;26(5):430-9 PMID 19706126
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Jun 10;74:25697 PMID 26066019
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23984276
Cites: Milbank Q. 2005;83(3):457-502 PMID 16202000
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Oct 26;74:29576 PMID 26507717
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23984291
Cites: Nurs Health Sci. 2013 Sep;15(3):398-405 PMID 23480423
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Apr;38(2):129-40 PMID 11223054
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):122-45 PMID 15887769
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2008 Jan;17(2):187-95 PMID 17331095
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):86-100 PMID 15887767
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-14 PMID 21041430
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2000 Aug;8(4):227-31 PMID 11894290
PubMed ID
27633080 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing vessel slowdown for reducing auditory masking for marine mammals and fish of the western Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296514
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:290-302
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Matthew K Pine
David E Hannay
Stephen J Insley
William D Halliday
Francis Juanes
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; Wildlife Conservation Society Canada, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. Electronic address: mattpine@uvic.ca.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:290-302
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Ecosystem
Fishes - physiology
Mammals - physiology
Noise
Ships
Abstract
Vessel slowdown may be an alternative mitigation option in regions where re-routing shipping corridors to avoid important marine mammal habitat is not possible. We investigated the potential relief in masking in marine mammals and fish from a 10 knot speed reduction of container and cruise ships. The mitigation effect from slower vessels was not equal between ambient sound conditions, species or vessel-type. Under quiet ambient conditions, a speed reduction from 25 to 15 knots resulted in smaller listening space reductions by 16-23%, 10-18%, 1-2%, 5-8% and 8% respectively for belugas, bowheads, bearded seals, ringed seals, and fish, depending on vessel-type. However, under noisy conditions, those savings were between 9 and 19% more, depending on the species. This was due to the differences in species' hearing sensitivities and the low ambient sound levels measured in the study region. Vessel slowdown could be an effective mitigation strategy for reducing masking.
PubMed ID
30301040 View in PubMed
Less detail

149 records – page 1 of 15.