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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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Determinants of quality of life in children with chronic somatic disease: pilot data from the GapS Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125687
Source
Qual Life Res. 2013 Mar;22(2):339-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Bryn D Webb
Maru Barrera
Joseph Beyene
Manuel Carcao
Denis Daneman
Irene Elliott
Grace W K Gong
Ilana J Halperin
Sarah Lord
Heather Melville
Unni G Narayanan
Sylvia Ota
Melinda Solomon
Lillian Sung
Nancy L Young
Mary Zachos
Brian M Feldman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Qual Life Res. 2013 Mar;22(2):339-49
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Disabled Children
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Peer Group
Pilot Projects
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
Quality of life (QoL) is a ubiquitous yet poorly defined concept; the precise determinants of QoL are rarely identified. We used pilot data from the GapS Questionnaire to investigate the most important determinants of QoL in children with chronic somatic illness.
We enrolled 92 participants including 60 parents and 32 of their children. The sample comprised rheumatology, diabetes, epilepsy, gastroenterology, cystic fibrosis, and day unit patients. Trained interviewers administered the GapS Questionnaire to parents, and to children if = 10 years. We determined the relative importance of different items for QoL.
Child participants had a mean age of 14.7 years. Children identified "having good friendships", "being happy most days", and "getting along with parents" as most important. Parents ranked most highly "being allowed to do all the things you like doing", "getting told you have done a good job at something", and "being physically able to do everything you enjoy doing".
Physical health items were not as important as social and psychological determinants of QoL in our pilot sample.
PubMed ID
22461136 View in PubMed
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Disturbed eating behavior and eating disorders in preteen and early teenage girls with type 1 diabetes: a case-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179466
Source
Diabetes Care. 2004 Jul;27(7):1654-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Colton
Marion Olmsted
Denis Daneman
Anne Rydall
Gary Rodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario Canada. p.colton@ utoronto.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2004 Jul;27(7):1654-9
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - psychology
Eating Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Exercise
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Ontario - epidemiology
Reference Values
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of eating disturbances in preteen and early teenage girls with type 1 diabetes to their nondiabetic peers.
A cross-sectional, case-controlled study of 101 girls with type 1 diabetes, ages 9-14 years, and 303 age-matched, female nondiabetic control subjects was conducted. Participants completed a Children's Eating Disorder Examination interview. Socioeconomic status, BMI, and diabetes-related variables were assessed. Groups were compared using chi(2) analyses.
Binge eating; the use of intense, excessive exercise for weight control; the combination of two disturbed eating-related behaviors; and subthreshold eating disorders were all more common in girls with type 1 diabetes. Metabolic control was not related to eating behavior in this study population.
Eating disturbances, though mostly mild, were significantly more common in preteen and early teenage girls with type 1 diabetes. Screening and prevention programs for this high-risk group should begin in the preteen years.
PubMed ID
15220242 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of an online education and support intervention for adolescents with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119741
Source
Soc Work Health Care. 2012;51(9):815-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
David B Nicholas
Karlee D Fellner
Marcia Frank
Margo Small
Ross Hetherington
Ruth Slater
Denis Daneman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. nicholas@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Work Health Care. 2012;51(9):815-27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology
Humans
Internet
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient satisfaction
Peer Group
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The current study evaluated an online education and support website intervention for adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. Participants were enrolled in an 8-week, online program addressing diabetes-related issues for adolescents. The evaluation comprised an intervention trial in which participants were assigned to an intervention or control group, and pre- and post-intervention measures of social support were administered. Outcomes indicated interventional gains approaching significance in participants' quality of relationships with others external to their family. Post-intervention qualitative interviews with intervention group participants identified beneficial impacts of decreased isolation, knowledge gain, and normalization of experience. Findings suggest that online information and support is an important resource in augmenting clinical care. Implications and recommendations for clinical practice are discussed.
PubMed ID
23078013 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the Career Development and Compensation Program in the Department of Paediatrics at The Hospital for Sick Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143106
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):64-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Denis Daneman
Julia Kennedy
Peter C Coyte
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, and Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):64-71
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Medical Staff, Hospital - standards
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Staff Development - organization & administration
Abstract
The Career Development and Compensation Program (CDCP) was created by the Department of Paediatrics at The Hospital for Sick Children, in Toronto, Ontario, to provide clearly defined job expectations, enhance career development and assess performance through two distinct processes: the annual review and the triennial review. Staff are expected to advance the goals of the department and the hospital through activities in clinical care, education and mentorship, and research and are rewarded for excellence through compensation and career advancement. We evaluated the CDCP and conducted interviews with 27 members of the department; these formed the primary basis for our summative evaluation. The study objectives were to evaluate (1) mechanisms to recognize contributions, (2) processes used to ensure staff accountability and (3) opportunities to increase efficiencies. Interviews with members of the department resulted in a broad and comprehensive understanding of the CDCP. It is regarded as a rigorous, transparent and fair program. Concerns about the CDCP stem from the potential negative outcomes of assigning value to particular activities, the inequitable level of support provided to staff across the department and the costs of the review processes. Several recommendations were identified that serve to increase equality and strengthen supports for members of the department, to improve the ability of the CDCP to evaluate the softer aspects of clinical care and scholarship and to adopt a more holistic and integrated approach in the evaluation of staff. These re-formed arrangements build upon past modifications to the CDCP and represent natural progressions in the development of a program that has wide support from members of the department.
PubMed ID
20523156 View in PubMed
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Exercise interventions in obese youth: are they effective?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154686
Source
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Sep;21(9):823-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Henderson
Denis Daneman
Janet Hux
Anthony Hanley
Author Affiliation
Department of HPME, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. melanie.henderson@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Sep;21(9):823-6
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Counseling - economics
Exercise
Humans
Obesity - economics - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
School Health Services - economics
Abstract
Given the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, effective and cost-efficient strategies to enhance children's physical activity levels are needed. Unfortunately, exercise interventions evaluated to date have had little impact on overweight and obesity in youth. Physical activity counseling interventions have emerged as an effective and inexpensive alternative to traditional, structured exercise programs in adults, and may be an interesting option for the treatment of obesity in youth.
PubMed ID
18924575 View in PubMed
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Feasibility of physician peer assessment in an academic health sciences centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137265
Source
Healthc Q. 2011;14(1):50-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sharon Ferrari
Ben Vozzolo
Denis Daneman
Daune Macgregor
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2011;14(1):50-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - manpower - standards
Canada
Employee Performance Appraisal - methods
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Peer Group
Physicians
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Abstract
Peer assessment has become an important component of physician evaluation. In an academic health sciences centre, in addition to clinical care there is a significant focus on education, training and research. The literature suggests that the use of a 360-degree evaluation can provide physicians with valuable information on many aspects of their practice and can inform both professional and personal development. We conducted a pilot study to determine the feasibility of using peer assessment as part of the evaluation of our academic physicians. To maintain anonymity, an outside company was engaged to conduct the study. Participants completed a self-assessment and provided the names of eight physician peers and eight non-physician peers who were then requested to complete an evaluation. In addition, 25 patients were asked to provide their feedback. All questionnaires were forwarded directly to the outside company, which then compiled the data and provided each participant with a final report. Results indicate that it is feasible to carry out peer assessment within an academic health sciences centre. Participants noted the value of the process for career development and quality improvement.
PubMed ID
21301240 View in PubMed
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Five-year prevalence and persistence of disturbed eating behavior and eating disorders in girls with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161897
Source
Diabetes Care. 2007 Nov;30(11):2861-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Patricia A Colton
Marion P Olmsted
Denis Daneman
Anne C Rydall
Gary M Rodin
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. p.colton@utoronto.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2007 Nov;30(11):2861-2
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
PubMed ID
17698613 View in PubMed
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Incidental thyroid abnormalities identified on neck US for non-thyroid disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143403
Source
Pediatr Radiol. 2010 Nov;40(11):1774-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Shivaram Avula
Alan Daneman
Oscar M Navarro
Rahim Moineddin
Stacey Urbach
Denis Daneman
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, 555 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Radiol. 2010 Nov;40(11):1774-80
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Humans
Incidental Findings
Male
Neck - ultrasonography
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Ultrasonography - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Incidental thyroid abnormalities detected on US examinations in children have not been well documented.
To determine prevalence of incidental thyroid abnormalities depicted by US in children and to describe the spectrum of appearances.
Retrospective analysis of clinical and US findings in children who had neck US from January 2006 to December 2007.
Of 1,228 neck US exams, thyroid was depicted in 287 children (mean age?=?6.2 years). Incidental thyroid abnormalities were detected in 52 (18%) (mean age?=?8.1 years). In 35 there were small (
PubMed ID
20490485 View in PubMed
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Innovation as the core strategy for the future success of academic health centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135828
Source
Can J Surg. 2011 Jun;54(3):150-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
James G Wright
Denis Daneman
Jeff Mainland
Janet Rossant
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Chief of Perioperative Services, Research Institute at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont., Canada. james.wright@sickkids.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2011 Jun;54(3):150-1
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - economics - organization & administration - trends
Canada
Education, Medical - organization & administration - trends
Efficiency, Organizational - economics
Hospital Design and Construction
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration - trends
Hospitals, University - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Leadership
Organizational Innovation - economics
Patient Care - trends
Research - organization & administration - trends
Workplace - organization & administration
Notes
Cites: World J Surg. 2003 Aug;27(8):930-4; discussion 934-512822049
Cites: Acad Med. 2005 Nov;80(11):980-916249294
Cites: Acad Med. 2009 Nov;84(11):1472-519858791
Cites: Am J Med Qual. 2008 Sep-Oct;23(5):382-818820143
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 9;360(15):1482-319357403
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Aug;35(2 Suppl):S243-918619406
PubMed ID
21443830 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.