Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14669 records – page 1 of 1467.

Description of extended pre-harvest pig Salmonella surveillance-and-control programme and its estimated effect on food safety related to pork.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99993
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:6-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
L. Alban
K. Barfod
J V Petersen
J. Dahl
J C Ajufo
G. Sandø
H H Krog
S. Aabo
Author Affiliation
The Danish Agricultural & Food Council, Copenhagen, Denmark. lia@lf.dk
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:6-15
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Safety
Humans
Incidence
Meat
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Zoonoses
Abstract
Salmonella in pork can be combated during pre- or post-harvest. For large slaughterhouses, post-harvest measures like decontamination might be cost-effective while this is less likely with small-to-medium sized slaughterhouses. In this study, pre-harvest measures might be more relevant. We describe an extended surveillance-and-control programme for Salmonella in finisher pigs, which, to establish equivalence to the Swedish control programme, is intended for implementation on the Danish island, Bornholm. The effect of the programme on food safety was estimated by analysing Salmonella data from pig carcasses originating from herds that would have qualified for the programme during 2006-2008. Food safety was interpreted as prevalence of Salmonella on carcasses as well as the estimated number of human cases of salmonellosis related to pork produced within the programme. Data from the Danish Salmonella programme were obtained from Bornholm. We used a simulation model developed to estimate the number of human cases based on the prevalence of Salmonella on carcass swabs. Herds are only accepted in the programme if they have one or less seropositive sample within the previous 6 months. In this way, the Salmonella load is kept to a minimum. The programme is not yet in operation and pigs that qualify for the programme are currently mixed at slaughter with those that do not qualify. Therefore, we had to assess the impact on the carcass prevalence indirectly. The prevalence of Salmonella in carcass swabs among qualifying herds was 0.46% for the 3 years as a whole, with 2006 as the year with highest prevalence. According to the simulation the expected number of human cases relating to pork produced within the programme was below 10. When the programme is in operation, an extra effect of separating pigs within the programme from those outside is expected to lower the prevalence of Salmonella even further.
PubMed ID
21083813 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in chiropractic practice in Denmark: a descriptive cross-sectional and prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126172
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Erik Poulsen
Henrik W Christensen
Søren Overgaard
Jan Hartvigsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e.poulsen@nikkb.dk
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):263-71
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Chiropractic
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - radiography
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered by the chiropractic practitioner.
A total of 2000 patient records and 1000 radiographs were reviewed retrospectively in 20 chiropractic clinics throughout Denmark. Information obtained included patients' primary complaint, physical examination and radiographic findings of hip OA, and treatment. Subsequently, the 20 clinics participated in a prospective survey where they collected equivalent information over a 2-week period.
Retrospective review of records revealed that 1.4% of patients in Danish chiropractic practice had signs of clinical hip OA. Of these, 59% demonstrated radiographic signs of hip OA. Prospective data collection revealed that 3.4% of new patients had signs of clinical hip OA. Fifty-four percent of these demonstrated radiographic signs of hip OA, and of these 70% were diagnosed as having OA of the hip for the first time. Initial treatment involved manual treatment and advice on over-the-counter pain medication and/or supplements. Of all 1000 retrospectively reviewed radiographs in patients 40 years or older, 19.2% demonstrated radiographic signs of hip OA.
Osteoarthritis of the hip is diagnosed and managed in primary care chiropractic practice in Denmark; however, it is likely underdiagnosed. In those newly presenting to chiropractic practitioners, first-time diagnosis with clinical and radiographic signs of hip OA appears to be common.
PubMed ID
22417795 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between willingness to use snus to quit smoking and perception of relative risk between snus and cigarettes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126184
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Oct;14(10):1221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Karl Erik Lund
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, P.O. Box 565 Sentrum, 0105 Oslo, Norway. kel@sirus.no
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Oct;14(10):1221-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Perception
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Use Cessation Products - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Tobacco, Smokeless
Young Adult
Abstract
Smokers are often incorrect in their assessment of the relative risk of snus and cigarettes. We have studied how perception of risks of snus compared with cigarettes was associated with the willingness of trying snus as a quit-smoking method.
Fourteen thousand seven hundred and forty-four Norwegian men aged 20-50 years were selected at random from a national representative web panel and sent a questionnaire by e-mail. Of the 7,170 (48.6%) who responded, there were 1,155 former daily smokers who reported method for quitting smoking and 1,213 current daily smokers who stated their willingness to try different methods for quitting smoking. They were also asked to assess the relative risk between daily use of snus and cigarettes.
Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for reporting willingness to try snus in future quit attempts was significantly higher (AOR = 4.82, p
Notes
Cites: Health Psychol. 1996 Sep;15(5):344-548891713
Cites: Health Psychol. 1994 Nov;13(6):461-707889900
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Dec;13(12):2035-4215598758
Cites: Tob Control. 2005 Aug;14 Suppl 2:ii3-716046699
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(4):321-4; discussion 24316087495
Cites: Inhal Toxicol. 2005 Dec 1;17(13):741-816195209
Cites: Tob Control. 2006 Jun;15(3):210-416728752
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jun 16;369(9578):2010-417498798
Cites: PLoS Med. 2007 Jul;4(7):e18517608560
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2007 Sep;9(9):977-8217763115
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2007 Oct;9(10):1033-4217943619
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2007 Nov;9(11):1191-617978994
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Feb 16;336(7640):35818276710
Cites: Psychol Med. 2008 Sep;38(9):1299-30818680625
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Aug 28;128(16):1808-1118787588
Cites: Tob Control. 2008 Dec;17(6):422-518849315
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Sep;104(9):1579-8519686528
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2009 Oct;11(10):1154-919564175
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):229-3219631684
Cites: PLoS Med. 2010 Feb;7(2):e100021620161722
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2010 Mar;29(2):121-3020447218
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Aug;12(8):817-2220622023
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Oct 6;102(19):1454-620870974
Cites: Tob Control. 2010 Dec;19(6):451-620671083
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Jan;106(1):162-720883459
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Jan;20(1):91-10021068204
Cites: Addiction. 1997 Oct;92(10):1327-379489049
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Jul;27(1):35-4115212773
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2004 Spring;19(1):17-2815059752
Cites: Tob Control. 2003 Dec;12(4):349-5914660766
Cites: Addiction. 2003 Sep;98(9):1183-912930201
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2002;4 Suppl 2:S55-6012580155
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Sep;10(3):201-311544374
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16(6):410-618048619
Cites: Hum Psychopharmacol. 2011 Jan;26(1):58-6221305611
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Feb;14(2):169-7522025541
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2011 Oct;101(10):1874-621330582
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2011 Apr;52(2):154-6021054423
PubMed ID
22416114 View in PubMed
Less detail

Status report - National Epidemiologic Database for the Study of Autism in Canada (NEDSAC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126201
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Mar;32(2):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
H. Ouellette-Kuntz
H. Coo
C T Yu
M E Lewis
D. Dewey
P E Hennessey
P D Jackman
M M Breitenbach
J J Holden
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. helene.kuntz@queensu.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Mar;32(2):84-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Databases, Factual
Humans
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
PubMed ID
22414305 View in PubMed
Less detail

The prevalence of urinary incontinence 20 years after childbirth: a national cohort study in singleton primiparae after vaginal or caesarean delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126211
Source
BJOG. 2013 Jan;120(2):144-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
M. Gyhagen
M. Bullarbo
T F Nielsen
I. Milsom
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2013 Jan;120(2):144-51
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cesarean Section
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Parity
Parturition
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors for urinary incontinence (UI) 20 years after one vaginal delivery or one caesarean section.
Registry-based national cohort study.
Women who returned postal questionnaires (response rate 65.2%) in 2008.
Singleton primiparae who delivered in the period 1985-1988 with no further births (n = 5236).
The Swedish Pregnancy, Obesity and Pelvic Floor (SWEPOP) study linked Medical Birth Register (MBR) data to a questionnaire about UI.
Prevalence of UI and UI for more than 10 years (UI > 10 years) were assessed 20 years after childbirth.
The prevalence of UI (40.3 versus 28.8%; OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.45-1.92) and UI > 10 years (10.1 versus 3.9%; OR 2.75; 95% CI 2.02-3.75) was higher in women after vaginal delivery than after caesarean section. There was no difference in the prevalence of UI or UI > 10 years after an acute caesarean section or an elective caesarean section. We found an 8% increased risk of UI per current body mass index (BMI) unit, and age at delivery increased the UI risk by 3% annually.
Two decades after one birth, vaginal delivery was associated with a 67% increased risk of UI, and UI > 10 years increased by 275% compared with caesarean section. Our data indicate that it is necessary to perform eight or nine caesarean sections to avoid one case of UI. Weight control is an important prophylactic measure to reduce UI. Current BMI was the most important BMI-determinant for UI, which is important, as BMI is modifiable.
Notes
Comment In: BJOG. 2013 Aug;120(9):115023837774
Comment In: BJOG. 2013 Aug;120(9):1150-123837775
Comment In: BJOG. 2013 Aug;120(9):1151-223837776
Comment In: BJOG. 2013 Aug;120(9):1152-323837777
PubMed ID
22413831 View in PubMed
Less detail

From "best practice" to "next practice": the effectiveness of school-based health promotion in improving healthy eating and physical activity and preventing childhood obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126213
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Christina Fung
Stefan Kuhle
Connie Lu
Megan Purcell
Marg Schwartz
Kate Storey
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 6-50 University Terrace, 8303-112 St, Edmonton, AB T6G 2 T4, Canada.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Body Weight
Child
Child Behavior
Diet - standards
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Schools
Abstract
In 2005, we reported on the success of Comprehensive School Health (CSH) in improving diets, activity levels, and body weights. The successful program was recognized as a "best practice" and has inspired the development of the Alberta Project Promoting active Living and healthy Eating (APPLE) Schools. The project includes 10 schools, most of which are located in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. The present study examines the effectiveness of a CSH program adopted from a "best practice" example in another setting by evaluating temporal changes in diets, activity levels and body weight.
In 2008 and 2010, we surveyed grade 5 students from approximately 150 randomly selected schools from the Canadian province of Alberta and students from 10 APPLE Schools. Students completed the Harvard Youth/Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire, questions on physical activity, and had their height and weight measured. Multilevel regression methods were used to analyze changes in diets, activity levels, and body weight between 2008 and 2010.
In 2010 relative to 2008, students attending APPLE Schools were eating more fruits and vegetables, consuming fewer calories, were more physically active and were less likely obese. These changes contrasted changes observed among students elsewhere in the province.
These findings provide evidence on the effectiveness of CSH in improving health behaviors. They show that an example of "best practice" may lead to success in another setting. Herewith the study provides the evidence that investments for broader program implementation based on "best practice" are justified.
Notes
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 1999;3(22):1-20710683593
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Apr;6(2):142-820874077
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1461-211192651
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Aug 10;360(9331):473-8212241736
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jan 8;289(2):229-3012517236
Cites: Science. 2003 Feb 7;299(5608):853-512574618
Cites: J Nutr. 2003 Mar;133 Suppl 3:895S-920S12612176
Cites: J Nutr. 2003 Nov;133(11):3476-8414608061
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2003 Dec;18(4):387-9614695370
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Feb;7(1A):123-4614972057
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Feb 26;350(9):855-714985480
Cites: Obes Rev. 2004 May;5 Suppl 1:4-10415096099
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2004 Sep;19(3):357-6815306620
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1986 Nov-Dec;77(6):425-303580992
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1995 Mar;95(3):336-407860946
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Aug;96(8):785-918683010
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1997 Oct;29(10):1344-99346166
Cites: Prev Med. 1997 Nov-Dec;26(6):808-169388792
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Mar;23 Suppl 2:S2-1110340798
Cites: Obes Rev. 2005 Feb;6(1):23-3315655036
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):432-515727972
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2006 Mar;21(1):76-8316249192
Cites: Future Child. 2006 Spring;16(1):109-4216532661
Cites: Health Rep. 2006 Aug;17(3):27-4216981484
Cites: J Sch Health. 2007 Nov;77(9):589-60017970862
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):181-818091006
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-3118767281
Cites: Obes Rev. 2008 Nov;9(6):615-2318647242
Cites: Obes Rev. 2009 Jan;10(1):110-4118673306
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2009;30:253-7219705560
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Jan 20;303(3):242-920071470
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2010 Jul;47(1):74-8220547295
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101 Suppl 2:S5-821133195
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-310797032
PubMed ID
22413778 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predictors of complications of free flap reconstruction in head and neck surgery: Analysis of 304 free flap reconstruction procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126249
Source
Laryngoscope. 2012 May;122(5):1014-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Gavin J le Nobel
Kevin M Higgins
Danny J Enepekides
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Laryngoscope. 2012 May;122(5):1014-9
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Free Tissue Flaps
Head and Neck Neoplasms - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to classify and analyze perioperative complications following free flap reconstruction in the head and neck and investigate potential predictors of these complications.
A retrospective chart analysis of 304 consecutive free flap reconstructions for defects in the head and neck were examined. Patient and operative characteristics as well as complications were recorded prospectively and analyzed using ordinal logistic regression.
The overall complication rate was 32.6% with a perioperative mortality rate of 0.3%. The flap loss rate was 2.0% and the partial flap necrosis rate was 1.0%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between perioperative complication and tumor stage as well as reconstruction site.
The rate and grade of complications with free flap reconstruction in the head and neck were found to be low. Higher tumor stage and pharyngoesophageal reconstruction were found to be associated with increased complication grades, whereas preoperative radiation alone and chemoradiation were not. Smoking and alcohol use, age, diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and preoperative myocardial infarction as well as preoperative cerebrovascular accident were not found to be associated with increased complications. No statistically significant difference in complication grades was found with different flap types or indications for reconstruction.
PubMed ID
22407907 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human parechoviruses are frequently detected in stool of healthy Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126259
Source
J Clin Virol. 2012 Jun;54(2):156-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Pekka Kolehmainen
Sami Oikarinen
Marjaleena Koskiniemi
Olli Simell
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Heikki Hyöty
Sisko Tauriainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Clin Virol. 2012 Jun;54(2):156-61
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carrier State - epidemiology - virology
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Feces - virology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Parechovirus - isolation & purification
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Viral Structural Proteins - genetics
Abstract
Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are common viruses mainly infecting young children. Most infections are mild, but HPeV3 causes severe CNS infections in new-born infants.
The aim was to study the epidemiology of HPeVs in Finnish general population in the period 1996-2007, with special emphasis on the different types circulating in Finland.
A total of 2236 stool specimens were collected from 200 healthy Finnish children in a prospective birth cohort study, most before the age of 2 years. Samples were tested for the presence of HPeV RNA using a specific RT-PCR. The genotype of HPeV was determined by sequencing the VP1 genomic region.
HPeV RNA was detected in 144 (6.4%) specimens from 78 (39%) children. The dominant type was HPeV1 (93% of the type-identified 105 samples), although types 3 and 6 were also identified. HPeV was found sequentially in more than one sample in 43 infections lasting up to 93 days. The positive findings were distributed equally in young ages and declined towards the age of 2 years. Infections clustered around the autumn months with no obvious change between years. No significant differences were seen between boys and girls.
HPeV is a common virus infecting Finnish children under 2 years of age. HPeVs circulate throughout the year with clear accumulation on autumn, also seen in individual years over the 11-year study period. The virus deserves increased attention and should be included in the test panel of clinical virus laboratories.
PubMed ID
22406272 View in PubMed
Less detail

Global left ventricular longitudinal systolic strain for early risk assessment in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126261
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2012 Jun;25(6):644-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kim Munk
Niels H Andersen
Christian J Terkelsen
Bo M Bibby
Søren P Johnsen
Hans E Bøtker
Torsten T Nielsen
Steen H Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. kim.munk@ki.au.dk
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2012 Jun;25(6):644-51
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Denmark
Elastic Modulus
Elasticity Imaging Techniques - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Stroke Volume
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Abstract
Left ventricular systolic function is a key determinant of outcome after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to study speckle-tracking global longitudinal strain (GLS) for early risk evaluation in STEMI and compare it with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), wall motion score index (WMSI), and end-systolic volume index (ESVI).
Five-hundred seventy-six patients underwent echocardiography =24 hours after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for STEMI. The end point was the composite of death, hospitalization with reinfarction, congestive heart failure, or stroke. Associations with outcome were assessed by multivariate Cox regression with adjustment for clinical parameters. Hazard ratios (HRs) for events within the first year are reported per absolute percentage GLS increase.
During a median follow-up period of 24 months, 162 patients experienced at least one event. GLS was associated with the composite end point (adjusted HR, 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.29) and also when controlling for LVEF (adjusted HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07-1.29) and ESVI (adjusted HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.08-1.28). Although WMSI was significantly associated with outcome beyond any association accounted for by GLS, a borderline significant association was found after controlling for WMSI (adjusted HR for GLS, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.21). When GLS or WMSI was known, there was no significant association between LVEF or ESVI and outcome.
In a large population of patients with STEMI, GLS and WMSI were comparable and both superior for early risk assessment compared with volume-based left ventricular function indicators such as LVEF and ESVI. Compared with WMSI, the advantage of GLS is the provision of a semiautomated quantitative measure.
PubMed ID
22406163 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low serum magnesium concentrations are associated with a high prevalence of premature ventricular complexes in obese adults with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126267
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Liana C Del Gobbo
Yiqing Song
Paul Poirier
Eric Dewailly
Ronald J Elin
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics & Human Nutrition, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, H9X 3V9, Canada. liana.delgobbo@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:23
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Heart rate
Humans
Logistic Models
Magnesium - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quebec
Ventricular Premature Complexes - epidemiology
Abstract
Premature ventricular complexes (PVC) predict cardiovascular mortality among several adult populations. Increased arrhythmia prevalence has been reported during controlled magnesium (Mg) depletion studies in adults. We thus hypothesized that serum magnesium (sMg) concentrations are inversely associated with the prevalence of PVC in adults at high cardiovascular risk.
Anthropometric, demographic and lifestyle characteristics were assessed in 750 Cree adults, aged > 18 yrs, who participated in an age-stratified, cross-sectional health survey in Quebec, Canada. Holter electrocardiograms recorded heart rate variability and cardiac arrhythmias for two consecutive hours. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between sMg and PVC.
PVC prevalence in adults with hypomagnesemia (sMg = 0.70 mmol/L) was more than twice that of adults without hypomagnesemia (50% vs. 21%, p = 0.015); results were similar when adults with cardiovascular disease history were excluded. All hypomagnesemic adults with PVC had type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Prevalence of PVC declined across the sMg concentration gradient in adults with T2DM only (p 0.70 mmol/L was 0.24 (95% CI: 0.06-0.98) p = 0.046 compared to those with sMg = 0.70 mmol/L.
sMg concentrations were inversely associated with the prevalence of PVC in patients with T2DM in a dose response manner, indicating that suboptimal sMg may be a contributor to arrhythmias among patients with T2DM.
Notes
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Aug;38(2):364-7011499725
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 1999 Aug;83(2):302-2010618948
Cites: Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Sep;238(1-2):163-7912349904
Cites: Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2003 Dec;24(12):619-2514654302
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jul 27;110(4):368-7315262826
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1982;212(1-2):89-917124464
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jan 24;312(4):193-72578212
Cites: Am Heart J. 1985 Jan;109(1):164-73966318
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1987 Nov 1;60(13):1036-423673904
Cites: Clin Cardiol. 1992 Feb;15(2):103-81371093
Cites: Miner Electrolyte Metab. 1993;19(4-5):314-228264519
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1994 Aug 1;74(3):232-57518645
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1994 Nov;24(5):737-527977315
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Nov 12;309(6964):1263-77888847
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1997 Feb;20(2):185-79118771
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 Mar;8(2):175-809229210
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1999 Jan;20(2):111-2010099907
Cites: Neth J Med. 1999 Apr;54(4):139-4610218382
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;28(4):645-5110480691
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2005 May;45(5):851-815861350
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2006 May 1;97(9):1351-716635610
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Sep 5;48(5):e247-34616949478
Cites: Arch Biochem Biophys. 2007 Feb 1;458(1):40-716808892
Cites: Arch Biochem Biophys. 2007 Feb 1;458(1):73-8917123458
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2007 Apr;26(2):121-3217536123
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):307-1018767277
Cites: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2008 Nov;19(11):1169-7418631274
Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 2009 Mar 15;77(6):937-4619022225
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Oct 20;120(16):1640-519805654
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2010 Feb;87(2):261-620004036
Cites: J Electrocardiol. 2010 May-Jun;43(3):251-920096853
Cites: Am Heart J. 2010 Sep;160(3):464-7020826254
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2011 Jan 15;107(2):151-521211594
Cites: Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:1721306649
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2011 Jun;106(6):785-9121558066
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2011 Nov;219(1):280-421703623
Cites: Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:11622192330
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Mar;75(3):550-411864862
PubMed ID
22405520 View in PubMed
Less detail

14669 records – page 1 of 1467.