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300943 records – page 1 of 30095.

BRCA1 gene mutations frequency estimation by allele-specific real-time PCR of pooled genomic DNA samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116636
Source
Breast. 2013 Aug;22(4):532-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Maksim S Anisimenko
Dmitriy V Mitrofanov
Olga B Chasovnikova
Mikhail I Voevoda
Sergey P Kovalenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Timakova Str. 2, Novosibirsk 630117, Russia. m.anisimenko@yahoo.com
Source
Breast. 2013 Aug;22(4):532-6
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Case-Control Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, BRCA1
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
The frequencies of four mutations in the BRCA1 gene (185delAG, T300G, 4153delA, and 5382insC) were estimated in the Russian population. The mutations were analyzed in 7920 DNA samples obtained from randomly selected Novosibirsk citizens and 570 samples from breast cancer patients at Siberian hospitals. The mutations were detected by allele-specific real-time PCR. The mutation analysis was performed with pooled DNA samples to reduce the cost of the study. The 5382insC mutation was found in 20 of 7920 (0.25%) population DNA samples and in 14 of 570 (2.46%) breast cancer samples; the T300G mutation was detected in 4 population samples (0.05%) and in 2 breast cancer samples (0.35%); the 185delAG or 4153delA mutations were not identified in any of the 7920 samples and were detected in 1 (0.18%) breast cancer case each.
PubMed ID
23375855 View in PubMed
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Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is associated with mortality in a community-based cohort of older Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116637
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2013 Apr;227(2):408-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Johanna Helmersson-Karlqvist
Anders Larsson
Axel C Carlsson
Per Venge
Johan Sundström
Erik Ingelsson
Lars Lind
Johan Arnlöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Johanna.Helmersson_Karlqvist@medsci.uu.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2013 Apr;227(2):408-13
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - urine
Aged
Atherosclerosis - metabolism - pathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality - urine
Cause of Death
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Kidney Diseases - pathology
Lipocalins - blood - urine
Male
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - blood - urine
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) indicates tubular kidney damage, neutrophil activation and possibly atherogenesis, however the prospective association between urinary NGAL (u-NGAL) and cardiovascular death in the community is not known.
This study evaluates the association between urinary and serum NGAL and mortality in a Swedish population of 597 men aged 78 years. During the study (median follow-up 8.1 years) 261 men died, 90 of cardiovascular causes.
U-NGAL was associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.0 for quartile 4 vs. quartile 1, 95% CI 1.0-4.0, P
PubMed ID
23375682 View in PubMed
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Relation of serum adiponectin levels to number of traditional atherosclerotic risk factors and all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (from the Copenhagen City Heart Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116638
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Apr 15;111(8):1139-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2013
Author
Soren Lindberg
Rasmus Mogelvang
Sune H Pedersen
Mette Bjerre
Jan Frystyk
Allan Flyvbjerg
Søren Galatius
Jan Skov Jensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen City Heart Study, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. soerenli@hotmail.com
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Apr 15;111(8):1139-45
Date
Apr-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atherosclerosis - blood - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Adiponectin exerts anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects and appears to protect against arteriosclerosis. Accordingly, an association between low concentrations of plasma adiponectin and cardiovascular (CV) disease has been demonstrated in several studies. In contrast, elevated plasma adiponectin has been associated with increased mortality and an increasing number of major adverse CV events (MACE). Because of these conflicting results, the true role of adiponectin remains to be elucidated. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we prospectively followed up 5,624 randomly selected men and women from the community without CV disease. Plasma adiponectin was measured at the beginning of the study. The median follow-up time was 7.8 years (interquartile range 7.3 to 8.3). The end point was all-cause mortality (n = 801), and the combined end point was MACE, consisting of CV mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke (n = 502). High adiponectin was inversely associated with an increasing number of traditional CV risk factors (p
PubMed ID
23375598 View in PubMed
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Exposure to persistent organic pollutants and risk of hypertension among Inuit from Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116639
Source
Environ Res. 2013 Apr;122:65-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Beatriz Valera
Marit E Jørgensen
Charlotte Jeppesen
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public health, Copenhagen, Denmark. beatriz.valera@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Res. 2013 Apr;122:65-73
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mercury - toxicity
Middle Aged
Pesticides - blood - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Selenium - toxicity
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is of concern in Arctic populations since these contaminants accumulate in fish and marine mammals, which is an important part of the traditional diet of these populations. Epidemiological and experimental studies have reported significant associations between POPs and increased blood pressure (BP) in populations with different degrees of exposure.
We aimed to assess the risk of hypertension related to increasing levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) pesticides.
Fifteen PCBs and 11 OC pesticides or their metabolites were determined in plasma of 1614 Inuit adults = 18 years living in 9 towns and 13 villages in Greenland. BP was measured using a standardized protocol. The risk of hypertension was estimated through logistic regression using POPs as continuous variables (log-transformed). Hypertension was defined as systolic BP = 140 mm Hg, diastolic BP = 90 mm Hg and/or antihypertensive treatment.
Overall, the odd ratios (ORs) of hypertension were not statistically significant for dioxin-like PCBs, non-dioxin-like PCBs and OC pesticides after adjusting for confounders. Once the analyses were stratified by age category (18-39 and = 40 years), increased risk of hypertension was observed for total dioxin-like PCBs among the youngest [OR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.74)] while a borderline protective effect was observed for total non-dioxin-like PCBs [OR: 0.81 (95% CI: 0.66-0.99)] among the oldest. Higher risk of hypertension was also associated with increasing p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) concentrations among the youngest [OR: 1.42 (95% CI: 1.08-1.85)].
Overall, no significant associations were observed between PCBs, OC pesticides and blood pressure in this highly exposed population although the associations differed by age category.
PubMed ID
23375553 View in PubMed
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Post-traumatic stress disorder in partners of people with epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116640
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2013 Apr;27(1):225-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Ditte Aagaard Norup
Ask Elklit
Author Affiliation
Danish National Centre for Psychotraumatology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2013 Apr;27(1):225-32
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Denmark
Epilepsy - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were to examine whether living with an individual who suffered from epilepsy was a potentially traumatizing event and to identify predictive risk factors in developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Six hundred fourteen respondents completed the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, the Crisis Support Scale, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. In addition, demographic variables were included in order to identify factors that might predict PTSD.
The percentage of the participants that fulfilled the symptom criteria of PTSD was 7.7%, and an additional 43.9% reported a subclinical level of PTSD. Clinical and subclinical anxiety was unveiled in 9.3% of the respondents.
Partners were at risk of PTSD when living with a patient with epilepsy. Identified variables that explained PTSD were frequency and types of seizures medication, side effects, and objective and subjective epilepsy severity, anxiety, and depression. High level of social support decreased the level of traumatic stress.
PubMed ID
23375389 View in PubMed
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Unemployment and ill health--a gender analysis: results from a 14-year follow-up of the Northern Swedish Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116641
Source
Public Health. 2013 Mar;127(3):214-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
I. Reine
M. Novo
A. Hammarström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. ievareine@hotmail.com
Source
Public Health. 2013 Mar;127(3):214-22
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To analyse the associations between unemployment and suboptimal self-rated health as well as high alcohol consumption, and to examine the role of possible mediating factors explaining the associations from a gender perspective.
The sample, from a 14-year longitudinal study with a 96.4% response rate, consisted of 386 women and 478 men who were either employed or unemployed at 30 years of age.
The health outcomes studied were suboptimal self-rated health and high alcohol consumption at 30 years of age. Logistic regression was used for analysis, and the relational theory of gender was used to discuss the findings.
A strong relationship was found between unemployment and suboptimal self-rated health among women, and unemployment and high alcohol consumption among men, even after controlling for health-related selection, potential mediators and background factors. All mediating factors in the model were attributable to suboptimal self-rated health among unemployed women. Two mediating factors were also substantially related to high alcohol consumption among unemployed men.
Long-term unemployment at a young age could have various health effects in men and women. At present, the mechanisms behind the health consequences are better understood among women. Research would benefit from developing theories in order to explain how youth unemployment leads to gendered health consequences.
PubMed ID
23375366 View in PubMed
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Early allograft dysfunction is associated with excess resource utilization after liver transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116642
Source
Transplant Proc. 2013 Jan-Feb;45(1):259-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
K P Croome
R. Hernandez-Alejandro
N. Chandok
Author Affiliation
Multi-Organ Transplant Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Transplant Proc. 2013 Jan-Feb;45(1):259-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Graft Survival
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Liver Failure - economics - surgery
Liver Transplantation - economics - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Postoperative Complications - economics
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Tissue Donors
Transplantation, Homologous - economics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited data on length of stay (LOS) following liver transplantation (LT), yet this is an important health services metric that directly correlates with early post-LT health care costs. The primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship between early allograft dysfunction (EAD) and LOS after LT. The secondary objective was to identify additional recipient, donor, and operative factors associated with LOS.
Adult patients undergoing primary LT over a 32-month period were prospectively examined at a single center. Subjects fulfilling standard criteria for EAD were compared with those not meeting the definition. Variables associated with increased LOS on ordinal logistic regression were identified.
Subjects with EAD had longer mean hospital LOS than those without (42.5 ± 38.9 days vs 27.4 ± 31 days; P = .003). Subjects with EAD also had longer mean intensive care LOS (8.61 ± 10.28 days vs 5.45 ± 11.6 days; P = .048). Additional factors significantly associated with LOS included Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, recipient location before LT, and postoperative surgical complications.
EAD is associated with longer hospitalization after LT. MELD score, preoperative recipient location, and postoperative complications were significantly associated with LOS. From a cost-containment perspective, these findings have implications on resource allocation.
PubMed ID
23375312 View in PubMed
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Relevance of sodium/glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1) to diabetes mellitus and obesity in dogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116643
Source
Domest Anim Endocrinol. 2013 Apr;44(3):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
D J Batchelor
A J German
S P Shirazi-Beechey
Author Affiliation
Epithelial Function and Development Group, Department of Functional and Comparative Genomics, Institute of Integrative Biology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZJ, UK. danb@liv.ac.uk
Source
Domest Anim Endocrinol. 2013 Apr;44(3):139-44
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Transport
Caco-2 Cells
Cloning, Molecular
Diabetes Mellitus - genetics - metabolism - veterinary
Dog Diseases - genetics - metabolism
Dogs
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Mutagenesis, Site-Directed - veterinary
Obesity - genetics - metabolism - veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sodium-Glucose Transporter 1 - genetics - metabolism
Transfection - veterinary
Abstract
Glucose transport across the enterocyte brush border membrane by sodium/glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1, coded by Slc5a1) is the rate-limiting step for intestinal glucose transport. The relevance of SGLT1 expression in predisposition to diabetes mellitus and to obesity was investigated in dogs. Cultured Caco-2/TC7 cells were shown to express SGLT1 in vitro. A 2-kbp fragment of the Slc5a1 5' flanking region was cloned from canine genomic DNA, ligated into reporter gene plasmids, and shown to drive reporter gene expression in these cells above control (P
PubMed ID
23375266 View in PubMed
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Relation between leukocyte telomere length and incident coronary heart disease events (from the 1995 Canadian Nova Scotia Health Survey).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116644
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Apr 1;111(7):962-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Siqin Ye
Jonathan A Shaffer
Min Suk Kang
Manjunath Harlapur
Paul Muntner
Elissa Epel
Duane Guernsey
Joseph E Schwartz
Karina W Davidson
Susan Kirkland
Lawrence S Honig
Daichi Shimbo
Author Affiliation
Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Apr 1;111(7):962-7
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Leukocytes
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Telomere - ultrastructure
Abstract
Leukocyte telomere length has been proposed as a biomarker of cellular aging and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether leukocyte telomere length is independently associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in the general population. Telomere length was measured using a polymerase chain reaction method for participants enrolled in the 1995 Nova Scotia Health Survey (NSHS95; n = 1,917). The primary end point was the first occurrence of a fatal or nonfatal CHD event. During a mean follow-up period of 8.7 years, 164 fatal or nonfatal CHD events occurred. Compared with participants in the longest tertile of telomere length, those in the middle and shortest tertiles had increased incidence of CHD events (6.2, 11.2, and 12.2 per 1,000 person-years, respectively). After adjustment for demographics, traditional risk factors, and inflammatory markers including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, those in the middle tertile had significantly elevated risk for incident CHD (hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 2.51, p = 0.02) compared with the longest tertile, whereas the risk for those in the shortest tertile was nonsignificantly elevated (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.90, p = 0.30). In conclusion, these findings do not support a linear association between leukocyte telomere length and incident CHD risk in the general population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23375186 View in PubMed
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The relationship between parental education and adolescents' soft drink intake from the age of 11-13 years, and possible mediating effects of availability and accessibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116645
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 14;110(5):926-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Nanna Lien
Ingunn H Bergh
Mona Bjelland
Mekdes K Gebremariam
Knut-Inge Klepp
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 14;110(5):926-33
Date
Sep-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages - supply & distribution
Child
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents - education
Time Factors
Abstract
The present study examined the prospective relationship between parental education and adolescents' soft drink intake over 20 months, and possible mediating effects of adolescents' availability and accessibility of soft drinks at home. A total of 866 adolescents, with data on two time points in the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study (2007-9), were included in the analyses. Data on intake and determinants of soft drinks were collected from adolescents and both parents by questionnaires. Mediation analyses using linear regression investigated the total and direct effects of parental education on adolescents' soft drink intake from the age of 11-13 years. In order to investigate prospective relationships, two models were set up to measure the (1) prediction and (2) change in consumption over 20 months. Possible mediation effects of availability and perceived accessibility at home were further examined in both models. The results showed that a lower level of parental education predicted a higher intake of soft drinks among adolescents after 20 months, and that higher perceived accessibility of soft drinks reported by adolescents and mothers explained 39 % of the total effect. No relationship was observed between parental education and the change in adolescents' intake of soft drinks over 20 months. Interventions aimed at families with low parental education should target the perceived accessibility of soft drinks at home in order to diminish social differences in adolescents' soft drink consumption.
PubMed ID
23375110 View in PubMed
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300943 records – page 1 of 30095.