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309960 records – page 1 of 30996.

An individual tooth wear index and an analysis of factors correlated to incisal and occlusal wear in an adult Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228283
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Oct;48(5):343-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
A. Ekfeldt
A. Hugoson
T. Bergendal
M. Helkimo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Oct;48(5):343-9
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bruxism - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth - pathology
Tooth Abrasion - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to introduce an individual tooth wear index and to use this index to investigate factors correlated to occlusal wear. The material consisted of 585 randomly selected dentate individuals from the community of Jönköping, Sweden, who in 1983 reached the age of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, or 80 years. The degree of incisal and occlusal wear was evaluated for each single tooth in accordance with criteria presented earlier. An individual tooth wear index, which made it possible to rank individuals in accordance with incisal and occlusal wear, was used as dependent variable to investigate factors related to incisal and occlusal wear. Of all factors analyzed, the following were found to correlate significantly with increased incisal and occlusal wear: number of existing teeth, age, sex, occurrence of bruxism, use of snuff, and saliva buffer capacity. Stepwise multiple regression analysis gave a total explanation factor of R2 = 0.41. It was also possible to distinguish well between groups of individuals with and without tooth wear by means of these factors.
PubMed ID
2251924 View in PubMed
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Infantile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is not an allelic form of Batten disease: exclusion of chromosome 16 region with linkage analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228284
Source
Genomics. 1990 Oct;8(2):391-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
I. Jokiaho
L. Puhakka
P. Santavuori
T. Manninen
K. Nyman
L. Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Genomics. 1990 Oct;8(2):391-3
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Child
Chromosome Mapping
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lod Score
Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Infantile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (CLN1) is the form of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) with the earliest onset of symptoms. The locus of the most common form of these disorders, juvenile NCL (CLN3), has been mapped to chromosome 16. We report here linkage data of the same region in Finnish CLN1 families. Our results indicate that CLN1 is not allelic with CLN3 but represents a different locus, which is not located within about 70 cM in chromosome 16.
PubMed ID
2249855 View in PubMed
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Differences in oral health status between institutionalized and non-institutionalized older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228285
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Oct;18(5):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
G D Slade
D. Locker
J L Leake
S A Price
I. Chao
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Oct;18(5):272-6
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
DMF Index
Female
Health status
Humans
Institutionalization
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Random Allocation
Sex Factors
Abstract
Differences in oral health status between independent and institutionalized adults have been difficult to interpret because the latter population is typically older and has a higher proportion of women, confounding any association between institutionalization and disease levels. We undertook an analysis of oral disease amongst institutionalized (n = 149) and non-institutionalized (n = 246) samples of older adults randomly selected from the population in East York, Ontario. When the confounding effects of age and gender were controlled by constructing 67 matched pairs, institutionalized people were more than twice as likely to be edentulous (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.09-4.29). This association was confirmed using data from all subjects in a logistic regression model. Analysis of covariance of data from dentate subjects revealed that the institutionalized seniors had fewer filled teeth (P less than 0.05, controlling for age and sex), but there were no statistically significant differences in the number of teeth which were missing, decayed, or requiring extraction. These findings suggest that antecedent, sociodemographic factors prior to institutionalization are responsible for the higher probability of oral disease in this group of older adults.
PubMed ID
2249414 View in PubMed
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Dental caries, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and saliva secretion rate in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228286
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Oct;18(5):249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
B. Klock
M. Svanberg
L G Petersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Dental Health, Bohusiän-County Council, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Oct;18(5):249-52
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Colony Count, Microbial
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Humans
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Saliva - microbiology - secretion
Secretory Rate
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Root - pathology
Abstract
In 718 Swedish patients, equally divided into four age groups (19-25, 26-45, 46-60, greater than 60 yr), salivary levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli, saliva secretion rate, and DMFS were registered. No significant differences were found between the various age groups either in salivary factors or in caries (D). Number of missing (M) and filled (F) surfaces increased with age. Prevalence of root caries, which increased with age, was significantly correlated to number of exposed root surfaces independent of age. Of the total study group, 50% had greater than or equal to 10(6) mutans streptococci and 40% had greater than or equal to 10(5) lactobacilli per mL saliva. Three percent had a saliva secretion rate of less than or equal to 0.5 mL/min. Correlation analyses showed that both mutans streptococci and lactobacilli significantly correlated to the caries prevalence but the r-value never exceeded 0.34.
PubMed ID
2249407 View in PubMed
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The epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in Saskatchewan, Canada, 1951-1952.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228287
Source
Can J Vet Res. 1990 Oct;54(4):457-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
R F Sellers
S M Daggupaty
Author Affiliation
Agriculture Canada, Health of Animals Laboratory Branch, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can J Vet Res. 1990 Oct;54(4):457-64
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Cattle
Diagnosis, Differential
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Foot-and-Mouth Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Horses
Humans
Milk - microbiology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sheep
Stomatitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Swine
Abstract
The epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in Saskatchewan in 1951 and 1952 was studied in order to determine origins of outbreaks and methods of spread. The epidemic was initially considered to be vesicular stomatitis and foot-and-mouth disease was not recognized until February 1952, three months after the initial infection. The reports prepared at that time were reviewed in order to obtain details of the numbers of animals infected and the source and date of infection for the outbreaks. Methods of spread were rated according to their likelihood. The introduction of infection by an immigrant through his clothes as well as by sausage was possible. The sequence of events from the first outbreak to the spread from a feedlot/packing plant and from a dairy farm, which failed to report the disease, were clarified. Methods of spread included movement of animals, animal products and people and the airborne route. Milk delivery and artificial insemination did not result in spread of infection. The quarantine of affected farms reduced spread by animals and deterred visits by people. The original diagnosis of vesicular stomatitis was due to misinterpretation of a lesion in an inoculated horse. Laboratory tests established the presence of foot-and-mouth disease. The limited extent of the epidemic, despite the delay in diagnosis, is attributed to (i) the low density of cattle, (ii) few infected pigs and hence less airborne virus and (iii) absence of waste food feeding and milk collection in addition to the limited quarantine imposed.
Notes
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1973 Mar;71(1):15-344511946
Cites: Can J Vet Res. 1990 Oct;54(4):465-82174297
Cites: Res Vet Sci. 1987 Nov;43(3):339-462832913
Cites: Res Vet Sci. 1977 Jul;23(1):70-5198862
PubMed ID
2249179 View in PubMed
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Drug adverse reaction reports: an integral part of good ophthalmologic practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228288
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1990 Oct;25(6):311-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1990 Oct;25(6):283-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
D J Addison
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1990 Oct;25(6):283-4
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Canada
Eye Injuries - prevention & control
Eye Protective Devices
Humans
Ophthalmology
PubMed ID
2249162 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1990 Oct;56(10):915-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990

Concurrent validity of the task-oriented assessment component of the Bay Area Functional Performance Evaluation with the American Association on Mental Deficiency Adaptive Behavior Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228291
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 1990 Oct;44(10):907-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
J P Klyczek
W C Mann
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, D'Youville College, Buffalo, New York 14201.
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 1990 Oct;44(10):907-12
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
New York
Occupational therapy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - methods - standards
Psychoanalytic Interpretation
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to test the concurrent validity of the revised Task-Oriented Assessment (TOA) component of the Bay Area Functional Performance Evaluation (BaFPE) (Bloomer & Williams, 1979) with Part 1 of the American Association on Mental Deficiency Adaptive Behavior Scale (ABS) (Nihira, Foster, Shellhaas, & Leland, 1969, 1974) and to develop a means of interpretation for the numeric scores on the TOA. Both measures were administered to 67 psychiatric inpatients within the first 14 days of admission. Low to moderate correlations were found between the TOA tasks and functional parameters and the ABS domains. Because the TOA shows low concurrent validity with the ABS, only limited interpretive descriptions for TOA scores could be developed.
PubMed ID
2248353 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology and aetiology of acute non-tuberculous salpingitis. A comparison between the early 1970s and the early 1980s with special reference to gonorrhoea and use of intrauterine contraceptive device.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228292
Source
Genitourin Med. 1990 Oct;66(5):324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
F. Kamwendo
L. Forslin
D. Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Orebro Medical Centre, Sweden.
Source
Genitourin Med. 1990 Oct;66(5):324-9
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydia trachomatis
Female
Gonorrhea - complications - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Intrauterine Devices
Salpingitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
More patients were hospitalised for acute salpingitis at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Orebro Medical Centre, Orebro, Sweden, during the 5 year period 1970-1974 (period I) as compared with that of 1980-1984 (period II), 666 patients and 524 respectively, a decrease of 22%. The majority of cases, 92% in period I and 85% in period II, occurred among women 15-34 years of age, that is a relative increase of patients aged over 34 from 8% in period I to 15% in period II. Concomitant urogenital gonorrhoea occurred in 26.2% of the patients in period I compared with 12.0% in period II, a highly significant decrease (p less than 0.001) mainly confined to the age group 15-24, whereas there was no relative difference for the two periods in the age group 25-34 years. The number of patients using intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) was 96/666 (14.4%) in period I compared with 113/524 (21.6%) in period II (p less than 0.001). There were also relatively more IUCD users among the patients with gonorrhoea and acute salpingitis in period II (15.5%) compared with period I (10.4%) but this difference was not statistically significant. From 1981 to 1984 370/424 patients were cultured for Chlamydia trachomatis and 27.8% (103/370) were positive. Thus Chlamydia trachomatis is at present, at least in the Orebro area, the most frequently isolated STD agent among acute salpingitis patients while gonorrhoea is of much less importance.
Notes
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1978 Aug;54(4):247-50678957
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1965;44:5-714299347
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Jan 15;136(2):179-866766274
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 Jan 3;282(6257):15-86778549
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Dec 1;138(7 Pt 2):1017-216451176
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1968;74(3):362-704305521
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1969 Sep;45(3):205-154981350
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1969 Dec 1;105(7):1088-984242830
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 1973;53(1):75-804120813
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1973 May 1;116(1):86-904633230
Cites: Trop Doct. 1973 Jul;3(3):123-74736658
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Jul 31;2(7979):221-459240
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1976 Aug 7;50(34):1342-4823654
Cites: J Biosoc Sci. 1976 Oct;8(4):373-427993236
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1977 Aug 15;128(8):838-50407795
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Dec 1;138(7 Pt 2):880-927008604
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Dec 1;138(7 Pt 2):960-46451178
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1981 Apr;57(2):125-96783261
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1982 Feb;59(2):206-96804898
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol. 1986 Oct;5(5):563-83536503
Cites: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1987 Mar;24(3):211-202951285
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1979 Oct 1;135(3):402-8484633
PubMed ID
2245978 View in PubMed
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309960 records – page 1 of 30996.