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Development of a physiotherapy prioritization tool in the Baffin Region of Nunavut: A remote, under-serviced area in the Canadian Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101118
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1466
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Miller Mifflin, TBzdell, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Health & Social Services, Government of Nunavut, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada
University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1466
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Baffin Region
Canada
Nunavut
Physiotherapy
Prioritization tool
Remote communities
Abstract
CONTEXT: This article describes the development and evaluation of a tool to prioritize physiotherapy referrals in a remote, under-serviced region in Canada's eastern Arctic. The Baffin Region of Nunavut is home to approximately 16 000 people dispersed across 12 communities accessible only by air. Physiotherapists are based out of the capital city, but provide services to clients throughout the region. Physiotherapists in the Baffin Region are generalists, treating clients from across the lifespan and from all practice areas. The region is under-serviced with regard to physiotherapy, and long waitlists for service are maintained. No previous physiotherapy prioritization tool existed to manage the diverse caseload.ISSUE: Physiotherapists were dissatisfied with perceived inequities in service delivery among the different communities in the region, and between client types. In response, a tool was created to prioritize physiotherapy referrals based on urgency and need, regardless of client location. The prioritization tool was developed by combining the authors' knowledge of the distinct and unique characteristics of the Baffin Region with background research. Three methods were used to collect background information: (1) a literature search; (2) a review of prioritization policies from other regions; and (3) interviews with physiotherapists working in similar remote areas in Canada. From the background research, common characteristics in prioritizing physiotherapy referrals as 'high priority' emerged. These were combined with the identified characteristics of the Baffin Region to create a tool that could prioritize physiotherapy referrals from multiple client types. The prioritization tool was then implemented and evaluated over a four-month period.LESSONS LEARNED: Following the implementation of the prioritization tool, a greater percentage of scheduled physiotherapy appointments were devoted to high priority groups, and there was a greater amount of service delivered to clients from the remote communities. Physiotherapists subjectively reported improved job satisfaction knowing that clients over the entire region were being assessed in order of priority, and decreased job stress as a result of reduced therapist time spent triaging referrals. Unanticipated outcomes from using the prioritization tool included subjectively reported improved communication with other health professionals, and changes in physiotherapy service delivery methods in the Baffin Region. Using the prioritization tool prompted increased client travel to the capital city for urgent physiotherapy appointments, increased use of videoconferencing for follow-up physiotherapy appointments, and increased use of a consultative model to deliver physiotherapy services. The tool could be adapted for use by other rural or remote physiotherapists working with multiple client populations in under-serviced areas. The Baffin Region Physiotherapy Prioritization Tool provides an objective method for making triage decisions, and has improved the equity with which physiotherapy services are delivered across the region.
PubMed ID
20572750 View in PubMed
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The use of Photovoice to document and characterize the food security of users of community food programs in Iqaluit, Nunavut

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101137
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2011 Apr-Jun;11(2):1680
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2011
Author
Lardeau, M
Healey, G
Ford, J
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Department of Geography, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Qaujigiartiit Health Research Network, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2011 Apr-Jun;11(2):1680
Date
Apr-Jun-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Food security
Nunavut
Photovoice
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Food insecurity is a chronic problem affecting Inuit communities. The most comprehensive assessment of Inuit food security to-date, the Inuit Health Survey, reported that 70% of Inuit pre-school children lived in ?food insecure? households. Food banks and soup kitchens are relatively new in the Arctic but the number of users is increasing. Little is known about the experience and determinants of food insecurity among food program users who are often among the most marginalized (socially and economically) in communities. The use of participatory research methods when working in the north of Canada can promote meaningful knowledge exchange with community members and this approach was used in the present ?Photovoice? research. Photovoice uses photography to develop a baseline understanding of an issue, in this case the experience and determinants of food insecurity among users of community food programs in Iqaluit, Nunavut. The target population includes those who face significant social and economic marginalization, an often neglected group in Arctic food systems research. METHODS: Eight regular users of food programs were recruited and engaged in a Photovoice research project to document factors determining their daily food consumption. The research method was introduced in workshops and discussion included the ethical concerns related to photography and how to take pictures. Participants were supplied with digital cameras, and asked to answer the following question using photography: 'What aspects of your everyday life affect what you eat and how much you have to eat?'. In the final workshop, photographs were discussed among the group and participants identified key themes in the photographs, offering an understanding of food insecurity from their perspectives. The group then discussed what should be done with the knowledge gained. RESULTS: Factors improving food security were the customary systems for sharing ?country food?, and the presence of social support networks in the community, such as the Food Bank, the Soup Kitchen and the Tukisigiarvik Center. Factors identified as negatively affecting food security were the high cost of food in the Arctic, and substance abuse. The participants decided by consensus whether and how the knowledge from this project would be disseminated. They decided that a museum exhibit of the photographs in the summer of 2010 and promotion of the results among policy-makers in Nunavut were of high priority. CONCLUSION: The use of participatory research approaches such as Photovoice offers promise for exploring food security issues among similarly disadvantaged and vulnerable populations elsewhere in the Arctic. This approach was found to be a useful method for gathering and sharing research data because the data was generated and analyzed by the participants. The clear and concise messages developed by the participants can be used to inform policy. This research method can assist in making a valuable contribution to health research, both in the Arctic and worldwide, because it promotes an understanding of the experiences of individuals from their own perspective.
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Vitamin D deficiency and disease risk among aboriginal Arctic populations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101221
Source
Nutrition Reviews. 2011 Aug;69(8):468-478
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sharma, S
Barr, AB
Macdonald, HM
Sheehy, T
Novotny, R
Corriveau, A
Source
Nutrition Reviews. 2011 Aug;69(8):468-478
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal populations
Arctic
Calcidiol
Chronic Disease
Deficiency
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D
Vitamin D
Abstract
Aboriginal populations living above the Arctic Circle are at particularly high risk of vitamin D deficiency due to limited ultraviolet B exposure (related to geographic latitude) and inadequate dietary intake (recently related to decreased traditional food consumption). Major changes in diet and lifestyle over the past 50 years in these populations have coincided with increased prevalence rates of rickets, cancer, diabetes, and obesity, each of which may be associated with vitamin D inadequacy. This review examines the risk factors for vitamin D inadequacy, the associations between vitamin D and disease risk at high geographic latitudes, and the recommendations for improving vitamin D status particularly among aboriginal Arctic populations. Traditional foods, such as fatty fish and marine mammals, are rich sources of vitamin D and should continue to be promoted to improve dietary vitamin D intake. Supplementation protocols may also be necessary to ensure adequate vitamin D status in the Arctic.
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Source
Global Health Action. 2011; 4: 99-105. DOI:10.3402/gha.v4i0.8456
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Ikäheimo, TM
Hassi, J
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences and the Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Source
Global Health Action. 2011; 4: 99-105. DOI:10.3402/gha.v4i0.8456
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
249466
Keywords
Arctic
Circumpolar areas
Cold
Frostbite
Injury
Population
Vulnerability
Abstract
Circumpolar areas are associated with prolonged cold exposure where wind, precipitation, and darknessfurther aggravate the environmental conditions and the associated risks. Despite the climate warming, coldclimatic conditions will prevail in circumpolar areas and contribute to adverse health effects. Frostbite is afreezing injury where localized damage affects the skin and other tissues. It occurs during occupational orleisure-time activities and is common in the general population among men and women of various ages.Industries of the circumpolar areas where frostbite occurs frequently include transportation, mining, oil, andgas industry, construction, agriculture, and military operations. Cold injuries may also occur during leisuretimeactivities involving substantial cold exposure, such as mountaineering, skiing, and snowmobiling.Accidental situations (occupational, leisure time) often contribute to adverse cooling and cold injuries.Several environmental (temperature, wind, wetness, cold objects, and altitude) and individual (behavior,health, and physiology) predisposing factors are connected with frostbite injuries. Vulnerable populationsinclude those having a chronic disease (cardiovascular, diabetes, and depression), children and the elderly, orhomeless people. Frostbite results in sequelae causing different types of discomfort and functional limitationsthat may persist for years. A frostbite injury is preventable, and hence, unacceptable from a public healthperspective. Appropriate cold risk management includes awareness of the adverse effects of cold, individualadjustment of cold exposure and clothing, or in occupational context different organizational and technicalmeasures. In addition, vulnerable population groups need customized information and care for properprevention of frostbites.
Documents

Ikaheimo-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Assessing diet and lifestyle in the Canadian Arctic Inuit and Inuvialuit to inform a nutrition and physical activity intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99760
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
  1 document  
Author
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. sangitag@ualberta.ca
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-17
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
6474495
Keywords
Arctic
Chronic Disease
Dietary and lifestyle transition
Environmental change
Aboriginal health
Abstract
Inuit in Nunavut (NU) and Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, were traditionally nomadic peoples whose culture and lifestyle were founded on hunting and gathering foods from the local environment, primarily land and marine mammals. Lifestyle changes within the last century have brought about a rapid nutrition transition, characterised by decreasing consumption of traditional foods and an associated increase in the consumption of processed, shop-bought foods. This transition may be attributed to a multitude of factors, such as acculturation, overall food access and availability, food insecurity and climate change. Obesity and risk for chronic disease are higher in the Canadian Arctic population compared with the Canadian national average. This present review describes the study population and methodologies used to collect data in order to study the nutrition transition amongst Aboriginal Arctic populations and develop Healthy Foods North (HFN), a novel, multi-institutional and culturally appropriate programme that aims to improve dietary adequacy and reduce risk of chronic disease. Included in this special issue of the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics are papers describing dietary intake patterns, physical activity levels, dietary behaviours, chronic disease prevalence and psychosocial factors that potentially mediate behaviour. A further paper describes how these data were utilised to inform and develop Healthy Foods North.
PubMed ID
21158957 View in PubMed
Documents
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Suicide among indigenous Sami in arctic Norway 1970-1998

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256641
Source
Page 432 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Silviken A
Haldorsen T
Kvernmo S
Author Affiliation
Center for Sami Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, Norway
Source
Page 432 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Sami
Norway
Suicide
Men
Women
Age
Living conditions
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
Documents
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Genotypic characterization of hepatitis B virus from chronic carriers living in the Canadian north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256659
Source
Page 88 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Osiowy C
Larke B
Giles E
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory, Yukon Department of Health and Social Services, Canada
Source
Page 88 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Hepatitis B
Virus
Canada
Liver cancer
Inuit
Vaccination
Arctic
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 2. Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health.
Documents
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A Pan-Arctic collaborative for e-Health: Need, value, and lessons

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256670
Source
Pages 575-578 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Richard E. Scott
Shariq Khoja
Hammond Durrani
Author Affiliation
Global eHealth Research and Training Program, Health Innovation and Information Technology (HiTEC), Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, Canada
Department of Community Health Sciences, The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
Source
Pages 575-578 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
eHealth
Health Research
Training
Healthcare
Knowledge
International Journal of Circumpolar Health
Arctic
Abstract
Objectives: To review experience from a recently established and successful thematic research network and to speculate on the potential value of a similar approach to more rapidly accumulate evidence and move forward implementation of eHealth solutions in the pan-Arctic setting. Study design: Retrospective review of (1) documents describing the genesis, deployment and performance of the Pan Asian Collaborative for Evidence-based eHealth Adoption and Application (PANACeA), and (2) the eHealth publication record of the International Journal of Circumpolar Health (ICJH) from 1998 to 2008. Methods: The consultant's report, first-year technical reports and interim presentations on PANACeA progress were reviewed, and key information that illustrated the progress and performance (challenges and successes) in planning, initiating and implementing this research network was extracted. In addition, the number of eHealth-related articles published in the IJCH over a 20-year period was enumerated. Results: The findings demonstrate that the thematic research network approach has value. Placed in the context of the relevance of eHealth to the Arctic, research into eHealth adoption and application as well as the evidence of sparse publication of eHealth activities in the circumpolar region, a similar approach focusing on northern circumpolar eHealth research could prove valuable. Conclusions: It is recommended that consideration be given to creation of a pan-Arctic collaborative for eHealth research in the northern circumpolar region.
Documents
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Introducing internet communications technologies to a northern health context: Best practices and potential implications

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256671
Source
Page 528 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Rawat R
Author Affiliation
York University, Arctic Health Research Network - NT
Source
Page 528 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Internet communications technologies
Arctic
Health services
Telehealth
Software
Global
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 13. Building Health Services Resources and Research Capacity.
Documents
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Alaska's great thirst: Water, energy, and health in Iñupiaq communities of the Northwest Arctic Borough

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256678
Source
Page 47 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Eichelberger L
Author Affiliation
University of Arizona
Source
Page 47 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Water
Energy
Health
Inupiaq
Economy
Communities
Subsistence
Arctic
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
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132 records – page 1 of 14.