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33979 records – page 1 of 3398.

Serum zinc and risk of type 2 diabetes incidence in men: The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276589
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2016 Jan;33:120-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Teymoor Yary
Jyrki K Virtanen
Anu Ruusunen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Sari Voutilainen
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2016 Jan;33:120-4
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Homeostasis
Humans
Incidence
Inflammation - blood - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood
Risk factors
Zinc - blood
Abstract
Zinc may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), because it is involved in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the role of zinc in the etiology of T2D has been poorly investigated. This study was conducted to study the association of serum zinc on T2D risk in middle-aged and older Finnish men.
This was a 20-year prospective follow-up study on 2220 Finnish men from the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD) who were 42 to 60 years old at baseline in 1984-1989. The main outcome was incident T2D. Serum zinc, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and, in a subset of 751 participants, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), were measured. Also, the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) was used to quantify insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), beta-cell function (HOMA-ß) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS).
At baseline, serum zinc was associated with higher BMI, serum insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-ß and IGFBP-1 and lower HOMA-IS. During the average follow-up of 19.3 years, 416 men developed T2D. Men in the highest quartile of serum zinc had 60% higher risk (95% CI 20-113%; P-trend
PubMed ID
26653753 View in PubMed
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Risk and course of motor complications in a population-based incident Parkinson's disease cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276603
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2016 Jan;22:48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Anders Bjornestad
Elin B Forsaa
Kenn Freddy Pedersen
Ole-Bjorn Tysnes
Jan Petter Larsen
Guido Alves
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2016 Jan;22:48-53
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Dyskinesias - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Levodopa - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Movement Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Superior Sagittal Sinus
Abstract
Motor complications may become major challenges in the management of patients with Parkinson's disease. In this study, we sought to determine the incidence, risk factors, evolution, and treatment of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in a population-representative, incident Parkinson's disease cohort.
In this prospective population-based 5-year longitudinal study, we followed 189 incident and initially drug-naïve Parkinson's disease patients biannually for detailed examination of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations as defined by the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale. We performed Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses to assess cumulative incidence and risk factors of these motor complications.
The 5-year cumulative incidence of motor complications was 52.4%. Motor fluctuations occurred in 42.9% and dyskinesias in 24.3%. Besides higher motor severity predicting both motor fluctuations (p = 0.016) and dyskinesias (p 0.1) independently predicted development of motor complications. Motor fluctuations reversed in 37% and dyskinesias in 49% of patients on oral treatment and remained generally mild in those with persistent complications. No patients received device-aided therapies during the study.
More than 50% in the general Parkinson's disease population develop motor complications within 5 years of diagnosis. However, they remain mild in the vast majority and are reversible in a substantial proportion of patients.
PubMed ID
26585090 View in PubMed
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Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276606
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Liv Mellesdal
Rolf Gjestad
Erik Johnsen
Hugo A Jørgensen
Ketil J Oedegaard
Rune A Kroken
Lars Mehlum
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (? = .21, p
Notes
Erratum In: J Trauma Stress. 2016 Feb;29(1):10626915448
PubMed ID
26581019 View in PubMed
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Light-to-moderate drinking and incident heart failure--the Norwegian HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276609
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:553-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2016
Author
Katalin Gémes
Imre Janszky
Staffan Ahnve
Krisztina D László
Lars E Laugsand
Lars J Vatten
Kenneth J Mukamal
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:553-60
Date
Jan-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
We analyzed the association between light-to-moderate alcohol intake and the risk of heart failure (HF).
We studied 60,665 individuals free of HF who provided information on alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort study conducted in 1995-97 in Norway. Sociodemographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors and common chronic disorders were assessed by questionnaires and/or by a clinical examination. The cohort was followed for a first HF event for an average of 11.2 ± 3.0 years. Mean alcohol consumption was 2.95 ± 4.5 g/day; 1588 HF cases occurred during follow-up. The quantity of alcohol consumption was inversely associated with incident HF in this low-drinking population. The risk was lowest for consumption over three but less than six drinks/week; the multivariate hazard ratio when comparing this category to non-drinkers was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.50-0.92). Among problem drinkers based on CAGE questionnaires, total consumption showed no favorable association with HF, even when overall consumption was otherwise moderate. Excluding former drinkers and controlling for common chronic diseases had minimal effect on these associations. Frequent alcohol consumption, i.e. more than five times/month, was associated with the lowest HF risk; the adjusted hazard ratio comparing this group to alcohol intake less than once/month was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.68-1.03). We found no evidence for a differential effect according to beverage type, nor that the competing risks of death from other causes modified the association.
Frequent light-to-moderate alcohol consumption without problem drinking was associated with a lower HF risk in this population characterized by a low average alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
26569362 View in PubMed
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Hypericum perforatum use during pregnancy and pregnancy outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276615
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;58:234-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Line Kolding
Lars Henning Pedersen
Tine Brink Henriksen
Jørn Olsen
Luke E Grzeskowiak
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;58:234-7
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - isolation & purification
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypericum - adverse effects - chemistry
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - adverse effects - isolation & purification
Plants, Medicinal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Premature Birth - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Hypericum perforatum (HP; also known as St. John's Wort) is one of the most commonly used herbal therapies in the management of depressive illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential side effects of HP during pregnancy on pregnancy outcome. Using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), we investigated outcomes among 38 HP exposed pregnancies compared to a group of 90,128 women. Associations between HP use and gestational age, preterm birth, birth weight, malformations and Apgar scores were investigated. Preterm birth did not differ across the groups. While the prevalence of malformations in the HP exposed group was slightly higher (8.1%) than observed in the control groups (3.3%; p=0.13), this was based on only three cases and was not of any specific pattern.
Notes
Erratum In: Reprod Toxicol. 2016 Jan;59:183
PubMed ID
26536653 View in PubMed
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Familial aggregation of stroke amongst young patients in Lund Stroke Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276623
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2016 Feb;23(2):401-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
A. Ilinca
U. Kristoffersson
M. Soller
A G Lindgren
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2016 Feb;23(2):401-7
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Registries
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The known monogenic forms of stroke are rare. The aim of this study was to analyze pedigrees of young stroke patients regarding possible monogenic cerebrovascular disease and to evaluate the possibility of genetic stroke in these families. This may contribute to a better understanding of disease mechanism in stroke.
Lund Stroke Register includes consecutive patients with first-ever stroke from a defined geographical area in southern Sweden. Early-onset (=55 years) stroke patients were systematically screened with regard to family history (FHx), and families with stroke aggregation were compiled. Participants provided information in a questionnaire on occurrence of stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) in their families. Information on cardiovascular risk factors (VRFs) and clinical stroke subtype was collected. FHx for stroke was considered positive when the patient reported either =1 first-degree relative with stroke/TIA, or no first-degree relative but =3 second- or third-degree relatives with stroke/TIA in a distribution compatible with monogenic inheritance.
Of 4103 stroke patients registered, 426 (10%) had first-ever stroke at =55 years and 338 (79%) of these answered the questionnaire. Of them, 159 (47%) reported a positive FHx. Twenty-eight (18%) of the probands with positive FHx had no known VRFs. Thirty-two families with =4 members with stroke were identified. In all these larger families the affected individuals with stroke were present in more than one generation.
Aggregation of stroke in families of early-onset stroke patients is not uncommon. Genetic factors with impact on stroke risk, including monogenic causes, need to be evaluated in future stroke studies.
PubMed ID
26499090 View in PubMed
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Use of tramadol in early pregnancy and congenital malformation risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276626
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;58:246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Bengt Källén
Margareta Reis
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;58:246-51
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Teratogens
Tramadol - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Only few studies exist regarding the risk of a teratogenic effect of tramadol when used in early pregnancy. Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, women (deliveries in 1997-2013) who had reported the use of tramadol in early pregnancy were identified. Maternal characteristics and concomitant drug use were analyzed. Among 1,682,846 women (1,797,678 infants), 1751 (1776 infants) had used tramadol, 96 of the infants had a congenital malformation and 70 of them were relatively severe. The adjusted odds ratio for a relatively severe malformation was 1.33 (95% CI 1.05-1.70). The odds ratios for cardiovascular defects (1.56, 95% CI 1.04-2.29) and for pes equinovarus (3.63, 95% CI 1.61-6.89) were significantly increased. The study suggests a teratogenic effect of tramadol but the risk increase is moderate.
PubMed ID
26482725 View in PubMed
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Practical management of irritable bowel syndrome: a clinical review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276634
Source
Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol. 2016 Mar;62(1):30-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Ellinor Almquist
Hans Törnblom
Magnus Simrén
Source
Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol. 2016 Mar;62(1):30-48
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidiarrheals - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Incidence
Interdisciplinary Communication
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Life Style
Patient care team
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder, frequently managed by general practitioners and gastroenterologists. It is a complex condition, characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits, and it affects 11% of the population worldwide. It has a profound effect on quality of life for many patients and poses a substantial cost to society. Due to the complexity and diversity of IBS, diagnosis and treatment can be challenging. Common drawbacks in diagnosing and treating this disorder include unnecessary tests, failure to establish trust in the physician-patient relationship and difficulties in explaining the diagnosis. Research in recent years has however refined the diagnostic criteria and improved our ability to safely identify IBS with a limited number of investigations. A concise diagnostic evaluation, guided adequate information, prompt initiation of symptom-guided treatment and consistency in the patient-doctor relationship can help relieve the suffering experienced by patients with IBS. For patients with mild symptoms, reassurance, education, lifestyle changes and dietary advice are often sufficient. Patients with moderate to severe symptoms might need symptom modifying drugs, and psychological treatments such as CBT or hypnotherapy may be offered at this stage. For patients with severe and incapacitating symptoms, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended and psychotropic drugs are often used. This clinical review offers suggestions for a diagnostic approach as well as a treatment strategy, based on the current evidence on pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment in IBS.
PubMed ID
26448307 View in PubMed
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Major femoral vascular access complications after coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures: A Danish register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276635
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:604-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Ditte Dencker
Frants Pedersen
Thomas Engstrøm
Lars Køber
Søren Højberg
Michael B Nielsen
Torben V Schroeder
Lars Lönn
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:604-8
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneurysm, False - epidemiology - etiology
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Femoral Artery - surgery
Hematoma - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Vascular Access Devices - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Vascular access complications after coronary angiography (CAG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are known to increase morbidity, prolong hospitalization and raise hospital costs. Therefore, risk factor identification and improvement of safety strategies for vascular management are important. We aimed to assess the incidence of major vascular complications related to femoral access, and to identify potential risk factors.
Over a period of six years, 23,870 index procedures (CAG) were performed in two centres, prospectively entered in the database and retrospectively analysed. Data was obtained from the Eastern Danish Heart Registry and cross-matched with data from the Danish Vascular Registry. Index procedures were defined as the first trans-femoral procedure. Demographic, procedural and mortality data, as well as information on access complications requiring surgery within 30 days were collected. Mortality data were collected for minimum 12 months.
We identified 130 (0.54%) access complications requiring surgery; 65 pseudoaneurysms (0.28%), 46 arterial occlusions (0.19%), 15 hematomas (nine groin and six retroperitoneal hematomas) (0.06%), and 4 arterial dissections (0.02%). Risk factors for complications were left sided femoral access (OR 4.11 [2.29-7.37] p
PubMed ID
26447671 View in PubMed
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Incidence, determinants and the transient impact of cancer treatments on venous thromboembolism risk among lymphoma patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276651
Source
Thromb Res. 2015 Nov;136(5):917-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Jennifer L Lund
Lene Sofie Østgård
Paolo Prandoni
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Peter de Nully Brown
Source
Thromb Res. 2015 Nov;136(5):917-23
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - complications
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
Valid estimation of the incidence and risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) among lymphoma patients has been limited by small studies focused on selected lymphoma subtypes and failure to account for death as a competing risk. Using a nationwide cohort of Danish lymphoma patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2010, we examined the incidence and risk factors for VTE and evaluated the transient impact of cancer treatments on VTE risk.
Medical databases contained cancer, comorbidity, treatment, and VTE information. We computed VTE incidence rates (IRs) per 1000 person-years and 1- and 2-year incidence accounting for competing risks. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we identified factors associated with VTE risk. In a nested self-controlled design, we evaluated the transient effect of chemotherapy, radiation, central venous catheter use and rituximab on VTE risk using logistic regression models and adjusted odds ratios (aORs).
VTE IRs were >40/1000 person-years within 180 days post-diagnosis, decreasing to 8/1000 person-years in year two. VTE risk was 2.9% and 3.5% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Lymphoma subtype, central nervous system involvement, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase were associated with VTE risk. Central venous catheter use increased the transient odds of VTE (aOR=6.7 (1.2, 28.1)).
We report a lower VTE incidence among lymphoma patients compared with prior studies. Lymphoma aggressiveness was the main driver of baseline VTE risk, whereas central venous catheter use increased transient risks. These accurate estimates may improve the identification of lymphoma subgroups at highest VTE risk, for whom future targeted prevention interventions may be beneficial.
PubMed ID
26371409 View in PubMed
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33979 records – page 1 of 3398.