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GET WELL: an automated surveillance system for gaining new epidemiological knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135088
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:252
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Anette Hulth
Gustaf Rydevik
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, SE-171 82 Solna, Sweden. anette.hulth@smi.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:252
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Communicable Disease Control - standards
Epidemiology
Health promotion
Humans
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - physiopathology
Information Storage and Retrieval - statistics & numerical data - trends
Internet - utilization
Medical Informatics Applications
Population Surveillance - methods
Search Engine - utilization
Seasons
Software
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Time and Motion Studies
Vomiting - diagnosis - physiopathology
Abstract
The assumption behind the presented work is that the information people search for on the internet reflects the disease status in society. By having access to this source of information, epidemiologists can get a valuable complement to the traditional surveillance and potentially get new and timely epidemiological insights. For this purpose, the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control collaborates with a medical web site in Sweden.
We built an application consisting of two conceptual parts. One part allows for trends, based on user specified requests, to be extracted from anonymous web query data from a Swedish medical web site. The second conceptual part permits tailored analyses of particular diseases, where more complex statistical methods are applied to the data. To evaluate the epidemiological relevance of the output, we compared Google search data and search data from the medical web site.
In the paper, we give concrete examples of the output from the web query-based system. We also present results from the comparison between data from the search engine Google and search data from the national medical web site.
The application is in regular use at the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control. A system based on web queries is flexible in that it can be adapted to any disease; we get information on other individuals than those who seek medical care; and the data do not suffer from reporting delays. Although Google data are based on a substantially larger search volume, search patterns obtained from the medical web site may still convey more information from an epidemiological perspective. Furthermore we can see advantages with having full access to the raw data.
Notes
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2005 Jul 1;7(3):e3615998627
Cites: AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2006;:244-817238340
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Dec 1;47(11):1443-818954267
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(2):e437819197389
Cites: Nature. 2009 Feb 19;457(7232):1012-419020500
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Aug;16(8):1319-2120678337
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 May 21;360(21):2153-5, 215719423867
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Aug;15(8):1327-819751610
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Nov 15;49(10):1557-6419845471
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(44). pii: 1938619941777
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Apr 14;180(8):829-3119364791
PubMed ID
21510860 View in PubMed
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Serum mercury concentration in relation to survival, symptoms, and diseases: results from the prospective population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20835
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):168-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Ahlqwist
C. Bengtsson
L. Lapidus
I A Gergdahl
A. Schütz
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnostic Radiology, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):168-74
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood Sedimentation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Educational Status
Epidemiology
Fatigue - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Mercury - adverse effects - blood
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Potassium - blood
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
A prospective population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden was started in 1968-69 and comprised 1462 women aged 38, 46, 50, 54, or 60 years at baseline. Follow-up studies were carried out in 1974-75, 1980-81, and 1992-93. The baseline study included an extensive medical and dental examination. Serum mercury concentration (beta-HG) was determined in deep-frozen samples from all participants in 1968-69 and in a random subsample of sera from participants in 1980-81, about 20 years after the baseline examination. S-Hg was statistically significantly correlated with number of amalgam fillings at both examinations. Of 30 defined symptoms and 4 different clusters of symptoms, no one was independently correlated with S-Hg measured in the samples from 1968-69, while there was a negative statistically significant correlation with over-exertion and poor appetite in 1980-81. Blood hemoglobin and serum B-12 concentrations in 1968-69 were statistically significantly and positively correlated with S-Hg, while erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the serum concentrations of potassium and triglycerides were significantly and negatively correlated with S-Hg, also after including potential confounders. Blood hematocrit examined in 1980-81 was negatively correlated with S-Hg. When including potential confounders, serum IgA was also statistically significantly correlated with S-Hg, but not in univariate analysis. No statistically significant correlation was observed between S-Hg, on the one hand, and the incidence of diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke, or cancer on the other, while a statistically significant negative correlation was observed with overall mortality when age and education were included as background variables. There were some correlations between biological variables and S-Hg, probably of no negative clinical significance, and we conclude that there is no association between disease and S-Hg on a population basis in middle-aged and older women.
PubMed ID
10480284 View in PubMed
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Source
Baillieres Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;12(4):605-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
H. Adlercreutz
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Research Centre, Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Baillieres Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;12(4):605-23
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Diet
Epidemiology
Estrogens, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage
Humans
Isoflavones - administration & dosage
Lignans - administration & dosage
Male
Phytoestrogens
Plant Preparations
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Epidemiological studies have revealed that high levels of lignans and isoflavonoids are frequently associated with low breast, prostate and colon cancer risk, as well as a low risk of coronary heart disease. These compounds seem to be cancer protective and/or are biomarkers of a 'healthy' diet. All soy protein products consumed by Asian populations have high concentrations of isoflavonoids. In other countries, such as Finland and Sweden, the lignan levels are higher in populations with the lowest risk because of a high consumption of whole-grain rye bread, berries and some vegetables. There is a strong association between fibre intake per kilogram body weight and lignan concentrations in body fluids. Breast cancer has been found to be associated with low lignan levels in the USA, Finland, Sweden and Australia. With regard to prostate and colon cancer, as well as coronary heart disease, the epidemiological data related to phytoestrogens are still very limited.
PubMed ID
10384816 View in PubMed
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Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion and increased UVB radiation: Potential impacts to human health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16498
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Heatlh. 2005 Dec;64(5):509-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
De Fabo, EC
Author Affiliation
The George Washington University, School of Public Health & Health Services, Laboratory of Photobiology & Photoimmunology, Washington, DC 20037, USA. drmecd@gwu.edu
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Heatlh. 2005 Dec;64(5):509-22
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Chemistry
Etiology
Epidemiology
Atmosphere
Cataract
Diet
Environmental Pollutants
Adverse effects
Greenhouse Effect
Health status
Humans
Immunosuppression
Inuits
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
Ozone
Simplexvirus
Skin Neoplasms
Sunburn
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D deficiency
Abstract
Contrary to popular belief, stratospheric ozone depletion, and the resultant increase in solar UV-B (280-320 nm), are unlikely to fully recover soon. Notwithstanding the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing the amount of ozone destroying chemicals into the stratosphere, the life-times of these compounds are such that even with full compliance with the Protocol by all countries, it will be decades before stratospheric ozone could return to pre-1980 levels. This raises the question, therefore, of what will happen to biological processes essential to the maintenance of life on earth which are sensitive to damage by increased UV-B radiation, particularly those involved with human health? The polar regions, because of the vagaries of climate and weather, are the bellwether for stratospheric ozone depletion and will, therefore, be the first to experience impacts due to increases in solar UV-B radiation. The impacts of these are incompletely understood and cannot be predicted with certainty. While some UV-B impacts on human health are recognized, much is unknown, unclear and uncertain. Thus, this paper attempts, as a first approximation, to point out potential impacts to the health and welfare of human inhabitants of the Arctic due to increased solar UV-B radiation associated with stratospheric ozone depletion. As will be seen, much more data is critically needed before adequate risk assessment can occur.
PubMed ID
16440613 View in PubMed
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Enteric disease due to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in hospitalized infants in Kotzebue, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1633
Source
Journal of Pediatrics. 1965 Feb;66(2):343-348
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1965
Author
McAlister, R.
Brody, J.A.
Overfield, T.M.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Journal of Pediatrics. 1965 Feb;66(2):343-348
Date
Feb-1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Bethel
Cold Climate
Cross-infection
Diarrhea
Epidemiology
Escherichia coli
Gastroenteritis
Infant
Kotzebue
Shigella spp.
Abstract
Investigations of the nature and cause of enteric disease in children under 2 years of age were conducted in Kotzebue on the Bering Sea coast of Alaska several miles above the Arctic Circle. The majority of cases of enteric disease leading to hospitalization were associated with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, an organism which previously had not been associated with enteric disease in the Far North except sporadically. Studies indicated that the source of infection was the community rather than the hospital. The predominant serotype was 0111:B4.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1710.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 688.
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Phlyctenulosis in the Eskimos of the Canadian eastern Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1646
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1963 Dec 14; 89:1212-1213.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
McLean, C.M.
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1963 Dec 14; 89:1212-1213.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Frobisher Bay
Fort Chimo
Resolution Island
Cape Dorset
Sugluk
Ivujivik
Coral Harbour
Lake Harbour
Resolute Bay
Strathcona Sound
Arctic Bay
Navy Board Inlet
Grise Fiord
Pond Inlet
Scott Inlet
Clyde River
Kivitoo
Broughton Island
Padloping
Cape Dyer
Wakeham Bay
Pangnirtung
Koartac
Payne Bay
George River
Port Burwell
PKC
Pediculosis
Arctic Regions
Canada
Epidemiology
Hypersensitivity
Inuits
Irritants
Keratoconjunctivitis
Lice Infestations
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Staphylococcus
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2504.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1069.
PubMed ID
14084699 View in PubMed
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Symptomatic hepatitis-B in southwest Alaska: clinical and epidemiologic features and serologic followup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1660
Source
Page 128 in International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 4th, Novosibirsk, USSR, 2-7 October. Scientific and technical progress and circumpolar health. Vol. 2.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1978
  1 document  
Author
McMahon, B.J.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Page 128 in International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 4th, Novosibirsk, USSR, 2-7 October. Scientific and technical progress and circumpolar health. Vol. 2.
Date
1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
199536
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Hepatitis B
Carrier state
Alaska
Epidemiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1934.
UAA - ALASKA RC955.5.I572 1978a vol.2
Documents
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[Propagation and structure of noninfectious diseases in children and adolescents living in regions with various anthropogenic load].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184481
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Mar-Apr;(2):43-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
S E Lebed'kova
G B Katsova
G Iu Evstifeeva
V V Sumenko
L A Perminova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Mar-Apr;(2):43-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Disease - classification
Environmental Exposure
Epidemiology
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A survey was made in 3205 children aged 6-17 years from the families of natives residing in the areas exposed to nuclear explosion (Group 1). A control group comprised 3200 children living under the similar climatogeographic and social conditions (Group 2). In Group 1 children circulatory diseases, lymphadenopathies, connective and bone tissue dysplasias come first in the structure of morbidity. There was an increase in respiratory diseases at the expense of long-ill children. The fact that lymphadenopathies and connective and bone tissue dysplasias are predominant and respiratory infection is persistent suggests that small-dose radiation has a negative impact on the above systems.
PubMed ID
12861692 View in PubMed
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AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE INFLUENCE OF BLOOD PRESSURE AND AGE ON CARDIAC SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53021
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1963;175:SUPPL407:1-233
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963

329 records – page 1 of 33.