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301280 records – page 1 of 30128.

Performance of tunnel restorations at 3-6 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198203
Source
J Dent. 2000 Aug;28(6):383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
S. Nicolaisen
F R von der Fehr
N. Lunder
I. Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Buskerud Public Dental Health Service, Kongsberg, Norway.
Source
J Dent. 2000 Aug;28(6):383-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
DMF Index
Dental Caries - radiography - therapy
Dental Cavity Preparation - classification
Dental Enamel - radiography
Dental Restoration, Permanent - methods
Dentin - radiography
Follow-Up Studies
Glass Ionomer Cements
Humans
Norway
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Tooth - radiography
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
the purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of the tunnel restoration method in the Norwegian public dental service.
all patients from three age cohorts (born 1975-1977) who had received one or more tunnel restorations at least 3 years earlier, at the public dental clinic in Kongsberg and a neighboring clinic in Numedal, were examined clinically and radiographically by two calibrated dentists. Individuals with two or more filled surfaces per year were classified as "caries active". The statistical analyses consisted of non-parametric Kaplan-Meyer estimates of the survival function, and rank tests for associations to the longevity data and the background variables.
a total of 182 restorations in 94 patients were studied. Sixty-five percent of the restorations were considered successful. A total of 118 restorations were censored within the 76-month observation period. The median survival time was estimated to be 55 months, with a 95% confidence interval of 51-61 months. About 90% survived 3 years, while only 35% survived 5 years. Both caries activity and operator had significant effects on the survival period. On the other hand, there was no difference between "wells" and "tunnels", tooth type, tooth surface or jaw with regard to success rate.
The tunnel preparation filled with currently available glass-ionomer cement is not a generally favorable alternative in primary approximal lesions. However, in the hands of a well-trained, careful operator it may be chosen as a semi-permanent solution for patients with modest caries activity.
PubMed ID
10856801 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a simplified semi-quantitative protocol for the estimation of Vibrio vulnificus in bathing water using cellobiose-colistin agar: a collaborative study with 13 municipal food controlling units in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198204
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2000 Jun;41(1):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
L. Høi
A. Dalsgaard
Author Affiliation
The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2000 Jun;41(1):53-7
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baths
Cellobiose
Cities
Colistin
Colony Count, Microbial
Culture Media
Denmark
Fresh Water - microbiology
Humans
Polymyxin B
Vibrio - isolation & purification
Water Microbiology
Abstract
A simplified semi-quantitative method using pre-enrichment in alkaline peptone water supplemented with polymyxin B and plating onto cellobiose-colistin (CC) agar for the estimation of Vibrio vulnificus in bathing water was evaluated. This protocol was tested in a collaborative study with 13 food controlling laboratories in Denmark during the 1999 bathing season in periods when water temperatures exceeded 20 degrees C. The average percentage of yellow colonies larger than 1 mm in diameter on CC agar that could be identified as V. vulnificus by colony hybridization with a species-specific DNA probe was 79%. This high percentage of specificity demonstrated that by using CC agar in estimating the level of V. vulnificus in bathing water, recognition of yellow colonies larger than 1 mm is sufficient for the identification of V. vulnificus with no further characterization needed. The simplified protocol may be included in the routine control of the microbial quality of bathing water done by the local food controlling laboratories, since it involves simple traditional and low-cost microbiological methods with no use of molecular skills or sophisticated equipment.
PubMed ID
10856777 View in PubMed
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Budget cuts may have led to E coli outbreak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198205
Source
BMJ. 2000 Jun 17;320(7250):1625
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-2000
Author
D. Spurgeon
Source
BMJ. 2000 Jun 17;320(7250):1625
Date
Jun-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Escherichia coli
Humans
Public Health Practice - economics
Water Pollution
PubMed ID
10856057 View in PubMed
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Gynaecologist banned in Canada appears before GMC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198206
Source
BMJ. 2000 Jun 17;320(7250):1623
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-2000
Author
C. Dyer
Source
BMJ. 2000 Jun 17;320(7250):1623
Date
Jun-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Great Britain
Gynecology
Humans
Male
Malpractice
Medical Errors
Postoperative Complications
PubMed ID
10856052 View in PubMed
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Suffocation using plastic bags: a retrospective study of suicides in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198207
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2000 May;45(3):608-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M J Bullock
D. Diniz
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2000 May;45(3):608-13
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asphyxia - mortality
Cause of Death
Demography
Female
Forensic Medicine - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Plastics
Retrospective Studies
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
One hundred and ten cases of suicidal suffocation using a plastic bag were identified in the files of the Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario, Canada, between 1993 and 1997. The records were reviewed to determine the demographic characteristics of this group compared with all cases of suicide in Ontario, the scene information, autopsy findings and toxicology results. Most suicides occurred in people over 60 years of age, with older women making up a considerable proportion of cases as compared with other methods of suicide. In 40% of cases the deceased was suffering from a serious illness. Autopsy findings were usually minimal, with facial, conjunctival and visceral petechiae present in a minority of cases. One or more drugs were detected in the blood in 92.6% of cases where toxicologic testing was performed. Benzodiazepines, diphenhydramine and antidepressants were the most common drugs found, with diphenhydramine the most common drug present at an elevated concentration. Information at the scene from "right to die" societies was uncommon. One quarter of decedents took additional measures, besides the use of drugs or alcohol, to ensure the rapidity, certainty or comfort of their death. This study further elucidates the characteristics of this uncommon method of suicide. It emphasizes additional scene findings, such as the presence of dust masks, physical restraints and modification of the plastic bag that may be of use to death investigators in determining the correct manner of death.
PubMed ID
10855966 View in PubMed
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Discounted lives? Weighing disability when measuring health and ruling on "compassionate" murder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198208
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Aug;51(3):407-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M. Rock
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Studies of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. mrock@po-box.mcgill.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Aug;51(3):407-17
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disabled Persons
Health Services Research
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Quality of Life
Saskatchewan
Value of Life
Abstract
This paper examines the politics of "suffering" by considering the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) alongside a controversial Canadian murder case, involving the killing of a child with disabilities by her father. The DALY aims to measure health and death correctly so as to allocate resources fairly, and eventually achieve better living conditions among the world's people. The Latimer controversy centres on the contention that some lives are not worth living, which the DALY's formula also implies. By ranking types of people according to their degree of disability, the DALY rates the lives of some people as worse than "a state equivalent to death". By examining the politics of "suffering" in the DALY and the Latimer affair, this paper underlines a valorisation of the "normal" body in much of the social science literature on health, medicine and suffering.
PubMed ID
10855927 View in PubMed
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Age, costs of acute and long-term care and proximity to death: evidence for 1987-88 and 1994-95 in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198209
Source
Age Ageing. 2000 May;29(3):249-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
K. Mcgrail
B. Green
M L Barer
R G Evans
C. Hertzman
C. Normand
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Age Ageing. 2000 May;29(3):249-53
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Health Care Costs - trends
Health Services for the Aged - economics - trends
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
Survivors
Abstract
the consequences of ageing populations for health care costs have become a concern for governments and health care funders in most countries. However, there is increasing evidence that costs are more closely related to proximity to death than to age. This means that projections using age-specific costs will exaggerate the impact of ageing. Previous studies of the relationship of age, proximity to death and costs have been restricted to acute medical care.
to assess the effects of age and proximity to death on costs of both acute medical care and nursing and social care, and to assess if this relationship was stable in a time of rapid change in health care expenditure.
we compared all decedents in the chosen age categories for the years 1987-88 and 1994-95 with all survivors in the same age groups. We measured use of health and social care for each individual using the British Columbia linked data, and costs of care assessed by multiplying the number of services by the unit cost of each service.
the Province of British Columbia.
all decedents in 1987-88 and 1994-95 in British Columbia in the chosen age groups, and all survivors in the same age groups.
costs of acute care rise with age, but the proximity to death is a more important factor in determining costs. The additional costs of dying fall with age. In contrast, costs of nursing and social care rise with age, but additional costs for those who are dying increase with age. Similar patterns were found for the two cohorts.
age is less important than proximity to death as a predictor of costs. However, the pattern of social and nursing care costs is different from that for acute medical care. In planning services it is important to take into account the relatively larger impact of ageing on social and nursing care than on acute care.
PubMed ID
10855908 View in PubMed
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Ten-year survival of the cemented Freeman-Samuelson primary knee arthroplasty. Data from the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register and the Royal London Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198210
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000 May;82(4):506-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
O. Robertsson
G. Scott
M A Freeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000 May;82(4):506-7
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Bone Cements - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Humans
London
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Sweden
Abstract
We report a ten-year rate of survival of 96% for the cemented Freeman-Samuelson knee arthroplasty in patients from the Swedish Knee Registry and the Royal London Hospital with revision for aseptic loosening as the criterion for failure.
PubMed ID
10855871 View in PubMed
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Development of an improved dosimetry system for the workers at the Mayak Production Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198211
Source
Health Phys. 2000 Jul;79(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
V. Khokhryakov
K. Suslova
E. Aladova
E. Vasilenko
S C Miller
D M Slaughter
M P Krahenbuhl
Author Affiliation
Branch No. 1, Federal Research Center Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk Chelyabinsk Region, Russia.
Source
Health Phys. 2000 Jul;79(1):72-6
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beta Particles
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Gamma Rays
Humans
Models, Biological
Neutrons
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium
Radiometry - methods
Russia
Abstract
Databases are being created that contain verified and updated dosimetry and worker history information for workers at the Mayak Production Association. Many workers had significant external and internal exposures, particularly during the early years (1948-1952) of operation. These dosimetric and worker history data are to be used in companion epidemiology studies of stochastic and deterministic effects. The database contains both external and internal dose information and is being constructed from other databases that include radiochemical analyses of tissues, bioassay data, air sampling data, whole body counting data, and occupational and worker histories. The procedures, models, methods, and operational uncertainties will be documented and included in the database, technical reports, and publications. The cohort of the stochastic epidemiological study is expected to include about 19,000 persons while the cohort for the deterministic epidemiological study is expected to include about 600 persons. For external dosimetry, workplace gamma, beta, and neutron doses are being reconstructed. The models used for this incorporate issues such as known isotopes, composition, shielding, further analysis of film badge sensitivities, and records of direct measurements. Organ doses from external exposures are also being calculated. Methods for calculating dose uncertainties are being developed. For internal dosimetry, the organ doses have been calculated using the established FIB-1 biokinetic model. A new biokinetic model is being developed that includes more information of the solubility and biokinetics of the different chemical forms and particulate sizes of plutonium that were in the workplace. In addition, updated worker histories will be used to estimate doses to some workers where direct measurements were not made. A rigorous quality control procedure is being implemented to ensure that the correct dosimetry data is entering the various databases being used by the epidemiologists.
PubMed ID
10855780 View in PubMed
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Metabolism and dosimetry of actinide elements in occupationally-exposed personnel of Russia and the United States: a summary progress report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198212
Source
Health Phys. 2000 Jul;79(1):63-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
V F Khokhryakov
K G Suslova
R E Filipy
J R Alldredge
E E Aladova
S E Glover
V V Vostrotin
Author Affiliation
Branch No. 1, Federal Research Center Institute of Biophysics, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Region, Russia.
Source
Health Phys. 2000 Jul;79(1):63-71
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Americium - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium - pharmacokinetics
Radiometry
Registries
Respiratory System - metabolism
Russia
United States
Abstract
The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) and the Dosimetry Registry of the Mayak Industrial Association (DRMIA) have been independently collecting tissues at autopsy of plutonium workers in their respective countries for nearly 30 y. The tissues are analyzed radiochemically and the analytical data are used to develop, modify, or refine biokinetic models that describe the depositions and translocations of plutonium and transplutonium elements in the human body. The purpose of this collaborative research project is to combine the unique information on humans, gathered by the two Registries, into a joint database and perform analyses of the data. A series of project tasks are directly concerned with dosimetry in Mayak workers and involve biokinetic modeling for actinide elements. Transportability coefficients derived from in-vitro solubility measurements of actinide-containing aerosols (as measured by the DRMIA) were related to specific workplaces within Mayak facilities. The transportability coefficients of inhaled aerosols significantly affected the translocation rates of plutonium from the respiratory tract to the systemic circulation. Parameters for a simplified lung model, used by Branch No. 1, Federal Research Center Institute of Biophysics (FIB-1) and the Mayak Production Association for dose assessment at long times after inhalation of plutonium-containing aerosols, were developed on the basis of joint USTUR and DRMIA data. This model has separate sets of deposition and transfer parameters for three aerosol transportability groups, allowing work histories of the workers to be considered in the dose-assessment process. FIB-1 biokinetic models were extended to include the distributions of actinide elements in systemic organs of workers, and a relationship between the health of individual workers and plutonium distribution in tissues was determined. Workers who suffered from liver diseases generally had a smaller fraction of systemic plutonium in the liver at death and a larger fraction in the skeleton than did relatively healthy workers. Also, the fraction of total systemic plutonium excreted per day was significantly greater for workers with liver diseases than for relatively healthy workers. These observations could have a considerable effect on organ dosimetry in health-impaired workers whose dose assessments were based solely on urinary excretion rates. A comparison of this model to other biokinetic models, such as those published by the International Commission for Radiological Protection, is currently underway as is the documentation of uncertainty estimates associated with the model.
PubMed ID
10855779 View in PubMed
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301280 records – page 1 of 30128.