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3215 records – page 1 of 322.

Experiences of abdominal massage for constipation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129525
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Mar;21(5-6):757-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Kristina Lämås
Ulla H Graneheim
Catrine Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Mar;21(5-6):757-65
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Constipation - nursing - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Massage - methods - nursing
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study aims to illuminate participants' experiences of receiving abdominal massage for constipation.
Abdominal massage has been found to decrease the severity of constipation and abdominal pain, but little is known about how patients experience receiving abdominal massage.
The present study is a qualitative descriptive study, based on individual interviews.
Nine adults receiving abdominal massage for constipation were invited to participate. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in Sweden between 2005-2007. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis.
Four themes were formulated: 'being on one's guard', 'becoming embraced by safe hands', 'being touched physically and emotionally' and 'feeling vulnerable'. The participants reported that they were on guard, i.e. they were sceptical about whether or not abdominal massage was effective and suitable. However, as the massage sessions continued, they found the massage pleasant and began to feel embraced and in safe hands. They described how the abdominal massage made them feel as 'being touched physically and emotionally' and their bowel habits were improved. Along with the improvements, their agony was gone and they felt relieved. However, they considered their new condition fragile and they felt vulnerable to relapse.
Abdominal massage was experienced as pleasurable, and after treatment, the participants felt more comfortable with their bowel function. Participants described abdominal massage as affecting the whole person.
Abdominal massage has been shown to be an effective intervention for constipation. A crucial aspect is that nurses need to be sensitive and respect the intimacy associated with the abdomen.
PubMed ID
22098585 View in PubMed
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Hoping for the best, preparing for the worst: the lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129558
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 May;21(3):360-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
L. Seibaek
L K Petersen
J. Blaakaer
L. Hounsgaard
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. Leneseib@rm.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 May;21(3):360-71
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - psychology - surgery
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
In this study, the lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery were explored, aiming to provide a patient perspective on being newly diagnosed and starting treatment for ovarian cancer. The study period ran from the first visit in the outpatient clinic, till 8 weeks later, when the women had either begun chemotherapy or completed their recovery. Ten women participated in two qualitative research interviews each, before and after surgery. By applying a phenomenological-hermeneutic text interpretation methodology, the findings were systematically identified, put into meaning-structures, interpreted and discussed. This process constituted the theme: 'Hoping for the best, preparing for the worst'. Final diagnostics and treatment start were extensive life events, where life itself was threatened, although hope and will were present. The women intuitively prepared themselves for the diagnosis and treatment. However, the ability to prepare was influenced by personal lifestyle, social conditions, coping strategies, and experiences of hope. The ability to prepare could be strengthened by providing adjusted information, psychosocial support and physical optimisation during the perioperative period. By offering targeted family counselling and taking good care of the women's general health and well-being, hope could be sustained and early cancer rehabilitation initiated.
PubMed ID
22092927 View in PubMed
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Choosing homebirth--the women's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129599
Source
Women Birth. 2012 Dec;25(4):e56-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maija-Riitta Jouhki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Lääkärinkatu 1, 33014 Tampere, Finland. maija-riitta.jouhki@uta.fi
Source
Women Birth. 2012 Dec;25(4):e56-61
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Childbirth
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Personal Autonomy
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
To describe the decision-making process and birth experience of ten women in Finland who had planned to have a home birth.
The data were collected by means of in-depth interviews in 2008 and were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
Several reasons led to a decision to give birth at home. The main reasons were: previous birth experience, considering birth to be a natural process, increased autonomy, the home environment, intuition, the desire to choose the birth attendant, mistrust of the medical establishment and the opportunity to have the baby's siblings present at the birth. There were inhibiting and facilitating factors which influenced the women's decisions, and before making their decisions women sought out information about home birth. Home birth was an extremely positive experience and women highlighted their desire for the development of parent education to empower women in their preparations for birth. Full autonomy, the participation of family members, trust in one's ability to give birth and the absence of pharmacological pain relief were major contributors to the positive birth experience. The need for empowerment through parent education was highlighted in the interviews.
To the women of this study home birth was very positive experience in which the autonomy was the important factor. According to this study maternity care services do not respond to women's individual wishes and services should be offer more alternatives and should be more empowering.
PubMed ID
22088677 View in PubMed
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Work ability: concept and assessment from a physiotherapeutic perspective. An interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129605
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Jul;28(5):344-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
K. Stigmar
C. Ekdahl
B. Grahn
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. kjerstin.stigmar@med.lu.se
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Jul;28(5):344-54
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Physical Therapists - psychology
Physical Therapy Modalities
Predictive value of tests
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Sick Leave
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Time Factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of this study was to ascertain experiences and perceptions among physiotherapists (PTs) in Sweden regarding the concept of work ability as well as their perspectives of their professional role in work ability assessments. We conducted an in-depth interview study with four male and twelve female physiotherapists working in the field of occupational health care, orthopaedics, primary health care or rehabilitation. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the data. Work ability was perceived as the ability to perform work tasks as requested. Having the potential to adjust at work and to allocate resources, having an attachment to the workplace and time factors were vital. The physiotherapists were striving for a well-defined role within a multiprofessional team, where work ability assessments were performed in a real work environment. The PTs experienced contradictory roles in relation to the patient but believed they could contribute with valuable material for assessments; this professional help was not always requested. It was noted that there was a need for experience and further education to enable PTs to further engage in work ability assessments. It is important to improve collaboration and to further discuss the work ability concept from the viewpoints of different professionals.
PubMed ID
22087705 View in PubMed
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Francophones living with HIV/AIDS in Ontario: the unknown reality of an invisible cultural minority.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129608
Source
AIDS Care. 2012;24(5):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andre A Samson
Noah M P Spector
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada. asamson@uottawa.ca
Source
AIDS Care. 2012;24(5):658-64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communication
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Ontario - epidemiology
Qualitative Research
Verbal Behavior
Abstract
A strong body of evidence demonstrates that education, prevention and intervention, in the context of HIV/AIDS, should take ethno-racial diversity into account. The current research focuses on the cultural sensitivity manifested by AIDS service organisation ASO professionals towards Francophone minority persons living with HIV/AIDS Francophone PHAs in the two main urban centres of Ontario: Ottawa and Toronto. More specifically, this qualitative research will describe two different points of view: Francophone PHA service users n=17 and ASO professionals n=12. Data were collected from multiple focus groups and analysed using a phenomenological methodology. The analysis revealed that an important difference exists in the perceptions of language as an integral part of ethno-racial diversity. For ASO professionals, language is perceived as a simple tool of communication. For Francophones living with HIV/AIDS, however, language is perceived as a way to convey sensitivity to their cultural reality and a full recognition of their Canadian citizenship. This research showed that cultural sensitivity should include a linguistic aspect when it comes to health-related services, especially in the context of an officially bilingual country.
PubMed ID
22087510 View in PubMed
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Team behaviors in emergency care: a qualitative study using behavior analysis of what makes team work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129622
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Pamela Mazzocato
Helena Hvitfeldt Forsberg
Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management, and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:70
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Female
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - standards
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Teamwork has been suggested as a promising approach to improving care processes in emergency departments (ED). However, for teamwork to yield expected results, implementation must involve behavior changes. The aim of this study is to use behavior analysis to qualitatively examine how teamwork plays out in practice and to understand eventual discrepancies between planned and actual behaviors.
The study was set in a Swedish university hospital ED during the initial phase of implementation of teamwork. The intervention focused on changing the environment and redesigning the work process to enable teamwork. Each team was responsible for entire care episodes, i.e. from patient arrival to discharge from the ED. Data was collected through 3 days of observations structured around an observation scheme. Behavior analysis was used to pinpoint key teamwork behaviors for consistent implementation of teamwork and to analyze the contingencies that decreased or increased the likelihood of these behaviors.
We found a great discrepancy between the planned and the observed teamwork processes. 60% of the 44 team patients observed were handled solely by the appointed team members. Only 36% of the observed patient care processes started according to the description in the planned teamwork process, that is, with taking patient history together. Beside this behavior, meeting in a defined team room and communicating with team members were shown to be essential for the consistent implementation of teamwork. Factors that decreased the likelihood of these key behaviors included waiting for other team members or having trouble locating each other. Getting work done without delay and having an overview of the patient care process increased team behaviors. Moreover, explicit instructions on when team members should interact and communicate increased adherence to the planned process.
This study illustrates how behavior analysis can be used to understand discrepancies between planned and observed behaviors. By examining the contextual conditions that may influence behaviors, improvements in implementation strategies can be suggested. Thereby, the adherence to a planned intervention can be improved, and/or revisions of the intervention be suggested.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22085585 View in PubMed
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The experience of empowerment in the patient-staff encounter: the patient's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129665
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Mar;21(5-6):897-904
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Annette Nygårdh
Dan Malm
Kerstin Wikby
Gerd Ahlström
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. annette.nygardh@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Mar;21(5-6):897-904
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - standards - trends
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - nursing - therapy
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Risk assessment
Sweden
Trust - psychology
Abstract
The aim was to explore empowerment within the patient-staff encounter as experienced by out-patients with chronic kidney disease.
Empowerment has an important role to play in the patient-staff relationship in the case of patients with a chronic disease. When it comes to patients with chronic kidney disease, there has been little research on empowerment, for which reason interviewing such patients about their experiences of empowerment will provide useful knowledge within the context of out-patient care.
A qualitative interview study was chosen to gain an understanding of empowerment from the patient perspective.
The study was carried out at an out-patient clinic in Sweden and involved 20 patients with chronic kidney disease. The interviews were subjected to latent content analysis.
Five of the seven sub-themes emerging from the analysis represented empowerment: Accessibility according to need, Confirming encounter, Trust in the competence of the healthcare staff, Participation in decision-making, Learning enables better self-management. The other two represented non-empowerment: Meeting with nonchalance, Lack of dialogue and influence. From the seven sub-themes, one comprehensive theme was generated: Creation of trust and learning through encounter.
The main finding regarding the central role of the creation of trust and learning through the patient-staff encounter underlines the importance of understanding empowerment from the patient's perspective.
Nursing and other healthcare staff need knowledge and understanding of the meaning of empowerment from the patients' perspective to meet their needs in out-patient care.
PubMed ID
22081948 View in PubMed
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Patients' goals related to health and function in the first 13 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129675
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):2025-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Eva Johansson
Joacim Larsen
Thérèse Schempp
Linnea Jonsson
Jeanette Winterling
Author Affiliation
The Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.mo.johansson@karolinska.se
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):2025-32
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Female
Goals
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Preference - psychology
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
Qualitative Research
Survival
Sweden
Transplantation, Homologous
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Patient participation in goal setting and decision making is a core component of the rehabilitation process, but there is little information on what patients want to achieve after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). The aim of this study was to describe adult patients' perceptions of goals related to health and function, as well as self-perceived limitations and facilitating strategies in the first 13 months after allo-SCT.
Fifteen patients with a median age of 44 years (range, 22-65 years) were interviewed on one occasion during the first year after allo-SCT. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
Results showed that patients felt that time after allo-SCT largely concerned: "to be healthy" and "to participate in a normal life". Some patients felt it was easy to set goals while others found it difficult. Most described goals had a long-term character. Patients were faced with a wide variety of limitations of which a few did not link to a described goal. Several facilitating strategies were described that either had or could help patients to reach their goals.
Our results indicate that assistance with setting achievable goals, including individualised strategies and support from health care professionals to realise the goals, may assist in the rehabilitation to restore health and function after allo-SCT.
PubMed ID
22081115 View in PubMed
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Dissecting the journey: nursing student experiences with collaboration during the group work process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129704
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2012 Nov;32(8):945-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lissa L Gagnon
Ginette D Roberge
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada. lgagnon@laurentian.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2012 Nov;32(8):945-50
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Male
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Retrospective Studies
Students, Nursing - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Since the outset of nursing care, group work processes have evolved into essential components of a nurse's role and responsibilities within the health care system. To reflect this trend, group work is often utilized as a medium to promote professional socialization in undergraduate nursing curricula. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the ways undergraduate nursing students experience collaboration during group work activities. Braun and Clarke's (2006) theoretical thematic analysis combined with Pollio et al.'s (2006) interpretive framework was utilized to capture the students' lived experiences regarding group work. The participants of this study consisted of 96 undergraduate students enrolled in a nursing program in Canada. Written descriptions of their perceptions of their group work practices were analyzed to determine the extent to which these adhere to the collaborative practice essential elements (Jones and Way, 2006). Analysis of the results revealed an unexpected element of collaboration that of the psychosocial element in group work. The results from this study expose advantages and disadvantages of group work processes during group work in nursing education. This type of insight is valuable for educators to prepare nursing students for the complex demands of working with interdisciplinary teams.
PubMed ID
22078865 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the implementation of an integrated primary care network for prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk in Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129748
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:126
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sylvie Provost
Raynald Pineault
Pierre Tousignant
Marjolaine Hamel
Roxane Borgès Da Silva
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, Canada. sprovost@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:126
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Networks - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - therapy
Disease Management
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Organizational Objectives
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Primary Health Care - utilization
Primary prevention - methods
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quebec
Questionnaires
Research Design
Abstract
The goal of this project is to evaluate the implementation of an integrated and interdisciplinary program for prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk (PCMR). The intervention is based on the Chronic Care Model. The study will evaluate the implementation of the PCMR in 6 of the 12 health and social services centres (CSSS) in Montréal, and the effects of the PCMR on patients and the practice of their primary care physicians up to 40 months following implementation, as well as the sustainability of the program. Objectives are: 1-to evaluate the effects of the PCMR and their persistence on patients registered in the program and the practice of their primary care physicians, by implementation site and degree of exposure to the program; 2-to assess the degree of implementation of PCMR in each CSSS territory and identify related contextual factors; 3-to establish the relationships between the effects observed, the degree of PCMR implementation and the related contextual factors; 4-to assess the impact of the PCMR on strengthening local services networks.
The evaluation will use a mixed design that includes two complementary research strategies. The first strategy is similar to a quasi-experimental "before-after" design, based on a quantitative approach; it will look at the program's effects and their variations among the six territories. The effects analysis will use data from a clinical database and from questionnaires completed by participating patients and physicians. Over 3000 patients will be recruited. The second strategy corresponds to a multiple case study approach, where each of the six CSSS constitutes a case. With this strategy, qualitative methods will set out the context of implementation using data from semi-structured interviews with program managers. The quantitative data will be analyzed using linear or multilevel models complemented with an interpretive approach to qualitative data analysis.
Our study will identify contextual factors associated with the effectiveness, successful implementation and sustainability of such a program. The contextual information will enable us to extrapolate our results to other contexts with similar conditions.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01326130.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22074614 View in PubMed
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3215 records – page 1 of 322.