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Renal recipients' educational experiences in the early post-operative phase--a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126179
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Dec;26(4):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Kristin H Urstad
Astrid K Wahl
Marit H Andersen
Ole Øyen
May Solveig Fagermoen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Norway. Kristin.h.urstad@uis.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Dec;26(4):635-42
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - psychology
Norway
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Postoperative Period
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Renal recipients need to acquire significant amount of knowledge for their life post-transplantation. More knowledge on kidney recipients' experiences after transplantation with regard to the patient education provided is needed. Sixteen renal recipients were interviewed 4-6 weeks post-transplantation about content and methods in the patient education programme. Data were analysed in the hermeneutic tradition. The patients experienced barriers towards learning in the early post-operative phase. Kidney transplantation was expressed as a 'turning point in life', causing learning difficulties because of both physical and mental stress. Survival knowledge was the label for topics concerning medication and rejection as they were experienced as essential for life. Situational knowledge, that is, knowledge related to recipients' individual life situations, requires further details in the main topics provided. The difference between knowing and practising what was taught was experienced as troublesome. The recipients expressed that a supportive learning atmosphere characterized by patience, respect, continuity and active participation was essential. This study revealed new knowledge about renal recipients' need for individual application of the educational content, as well as cognitive difficulties, and other factors impacting on learning in the early post-operative phase. The patients' perspective is an important and useful aid in creating effective interventions in this field.
PubMed ID
22417055 View in PubMed
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How the medical culture contributes to coworker-perpetrated harassment and abuse of family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126217
Source
Ann Fam Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;10(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Baukje Miedema
Leslie MacIntyre
Sue Tatemichi
Anita Lambert-Lanning
Francine Lemire
Donna Manca
Vivian Ramsden
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University Family Medicine Teaching Unit, Fredericton, Canada. Baukje.miedema@horizonNB.ca
Source
Ann Fam Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;10(2):111-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Organizational Culture
Physicians, Family - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sexual Harassment - psychology
Social Behavior
Violence - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians has been associated with higher levels of stress, increased consumption of alcohol, and higher risk for developing mental health problems. Few studies have examined issues contributing to abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians.
For the overall study we used a mixed methods design, which included a cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of active family physicians from the database of the College of Family Physicians of Canada and telephone interviews with those who reported experiencing work related harassment and abuse in the last year. The data presented here arise from the qualitative interviews of the study, which were analyzed thematically.
The interview arm of the study included 23 female and 14 male participants. The major themes that emerged from the study were (1) modeling of abusive behaviors, (2) status hierarchy among various medical disciplines, (3) shortage of physicians, and (4) lack of transparent policies and follow-up procedures after abusive encounters. The results are discussed using the broken window theory.
Many family physicians experience harassing and abusive encounters during their training or in the workplace. The current medical culture appears to contribute to harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians in Canada. We described the components that intentionally or unintentionally facilitate abusive behavior in the medical culture.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22412002 View in PubMed
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The ICU patient room: views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin: a phenomenological hermeneutical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126363
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2012 Jun;28(3):176-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Sepideh Olausson
Margaretha Ekebergh
Berit Lindahl
Author Affiliation
University of Borås, School of Health Sciences, Allégatan 1 SE-501 90 Borås, Sweden. sepideh.olausson@hb.se
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2012 Jun;28(3):176-84
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Caregivers - psychology
Family Relations
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Holistic Health
Hospitals, General
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Interior Design and Furnishings
Life Change Events
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Care - standards
Patient-Centered Care - manpower - standards
Patients' Rooms
Privacy - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The rooms in Intensive Care Units are considered as high-tech environments and believed to affect recovery process and wellbeing of patients. Moreover, the design and interiors affect the interplay between the patient and the next of kin.
The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the meanings of the intensive care patient room as experienced by next of kin.
Next of kin (n=14) from two different intensive care units participated. Data were collected through photo-voice and analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method.
Three major themes emerged; dwelling in the room and time, becoming at home and extension of the room. The results show that the room is perceived as a lived and extended place and space. The design, interiors and furnishing in the patient room are fundamental in shaping the next of kin's experiences in the room and affect wellbeing.
How intensive care patient rooms are designed, the place given to next of kin and the way they are received in the room are decisive for the support given to the loved one. Simple interventions can make the patient room a more healing environment.
PubMed ID
22397997 View in PubMed
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'I deal with the small things': the doctor-patient relationship and professional identity in GPs' stories of cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126371
Source
Health (London). 2012 Nov;16(6):569-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
May-Lill Johansen
Knut Arne Holtedahl
Annette Sofie Davidsen
Carl Edvard Rudebeck
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Norway. may-lill.johansen@uit.no
Source
Health (London). 2012 Nov;16(6):569-84
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Existentialism
Female
General Practitioners - psychology
Humans
Male
Narration
Neoplasms - pathology - psychology - therapy
Norway
Patient-Centered Care
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Abstract
An important part of GPs' work consists of attending to the everyday and existential conditions of human being. In these life world aspects, biomedicine is often not the relevant theory to guide the GP; nevertheless they are a part of GPs' professional domain. In cancer care, previous studies have shown that GPs with a biomedical perspective on medicine could feel subordinate to specialists, and that doctors with a curative focus could see disease progression as a personal failure. The aim of this study was to explore in depth the experiences of being a GP for people with advanced cancer. Fourteen Norwegian GPs were interviewed about accompanying patients through a cancer illness. Their stories were analysed using a narrative approach. The GPs expressed a strong commitment to these patients, a loyalty which in some cases could be weakened due to judgements of distant specialists. In view of the GPs' close knowledge of their patients' background and history this subordination was a paradox, mirroring a hierarchy of medical knowledge. The GPs had an ideal of honesty and openness about death, which they sometimes failed. To reach the ideal of honesty, clinicians would have to abandon the biomedical ideal of mastering human nature through interventions and acknowledge the fundamental uncertainty and finiteness of human life. GPs may learn from being with their patients that bodily and existential suffering are connected, and thus learn implicitly to overlook the body-mind dualism. This practical wisdom lacks a theoretical anchoring, which is a problem not only for general practice.
PubMed ID
22397893 View in PubMed
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Troubled bodies--troubled men: a narrative analysis of men's stories of chronic muscle pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126404
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(21):1765-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Birgitte Ahlsen
Anne M Mengshoel
Kari N Solbrække
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Institute of Health and Society, Oslo, Norway. birgitte.ahlsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(21):1765-73
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anecdotes as Topic
Chronic Pain - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Masculinity
Middle Aged
Narration
Neck Pain - psychology
Norway
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine how men present themselves as patients with chronic pain and how the men's subjective experience of pain interplay with dominant norms of masculinity.
The material consists of qualitative interviews with 10 Norwegian men on rehabilitation from chronic neck pain. The data is subjected to narrative analysis combined with a gender-sensitive perspective.
The men's accounts of chronic pain were narrated as a series of events, displaying physical impairments and demanding work and troubled private affairs. Through rich descriptions of presumably objective facts, like heredity, physical injury and the character of the men's work, and comparatively little information about the men's personal experiences of pain and distress, a rational and self-controlled masculinity is displayed. However, extrapolation of the analysis also brought out how human suffering, such as chronic headaches, the losing of control and of oneself, is narrated in the men's stories.
Men's stories of chronic muscle pain display a subtle balance between following dominant norms of masculinity, such as being rational and in self-control, and a need to express vulnerability as human beings. We argue that health care professionals should be sensitive to the dynamics of subjectivities and cultural norms of gender within patients' illness stories.
PubMed ID
22394105 View in PubMed
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'I am absolutely shattered': the impact of chronic low back pain on Australian Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126416
Source
Eur J Pain. 2012 Oct;16(9):1331-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
I B Lin
P B O'Sullivan
J A Coffin
D B Mak
S. Toussaint
L M Straker
Author Affiliation
Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. ivan.lin@cucrh.uwa.edu.au
Source
Eur J Pain. 2012 Oct;16(9):1331-41
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - psychology
Cost of Illness
Culture
Emotions
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - ethnology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Qualitative Research
Severity of Illness Index
Social Participation
Abstract
Aboriginal people in Australia have been uniquely identified as less susceptible to chronic low back pain (CLBP) disability when compared to non-Aboriginal populations, reportedly due to cultural beliefs about pain. A qualitative, culturally secure research approach was used to explore this assumption.
In-depth interviews were undertaken with 32 Aboriginal men and women with CLBP in regional and remote areas of Western Australia. Interviews were conducted collaboratively with male and female Aboriginal co-investigators, and with the support of local Aboriginal community organizations. A primary focus was to investigate the impact of CLBP from the perspective of Aboriginal people living with the condition.
The experience of CLBP was found to be multidimensional, impacting on activities of daily life, employment, sport and family participation, emotional and cultural well-being.
Contrary to previous assumptions, CLBP is profoundly disabling for some Aboriginal people and a priority health concern. Issues of gender, cultural obligations and the emotional consequences of CLBP are important consideration for health care. These findings, and the contextual approach used to gain an in-depth understanding of CLBP, may be relevant to populations elsewhere.
PubMed ID
22392923 View in PubMed
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Institutionalizing integrated treatment for concurrent disorders: creating new organizational discourse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126458
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2013 Jan-Mar;38(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gabriela Novotná
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster Childrens' Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. novotng@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2013 Jan-Mar;38(1):51-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Decision Making, Organizational
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration - standards
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - methods
Diffusion of Innovation
Disclosure
Documentation - standards
Gambling - therapy
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - standards
Mental Disorders - therapy
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Policy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Qualitative Research
Substance-Related Disorders - therapy
Abstract
The high overlap of mental health and substance use problems in the Canadian health care system and the subsequent demand for more effective services for clients with these high-risk issues have stimulated the debate on their integrated treatment. Although the idea of integration has been endorsed by decision makers at both programs and system levels, little attention has been paid to factors that have facilitated this process.
In this article, the processes by which organizational texts, language, metaphors, and symbols have facilitated institutionalization of integrated treatment are identified and discussed.
Findings from a qualitative case study of 2 treatment programs that were part of a large, urban hospital in Ontario providing services for populations with concurrent disorders are presented. Data were collected using semistructured interviews with professionals and clients, analysis of policy and organizational documents, and nonparticipant observations.
Research evidence on comorbidity, government reports, and other organizational texts that were created and disseminated across the province has contributed to the dissemination of the concept of integration. Certain ideas might be successfully implemented when environments are conducive to change; such environmental catalysts include the status of professionals who support new discourse, the characteristics and importance of the problem being addressed, and the timing of implementation. The findings clearly demonstrate that the conditions of the wider institutional environment-the emergence of research evidence on comorbidity and the provincial health care reform, with its focus on rationalizing the existing health care system-supported the idea of integration.
The ability to understand how discursive activities of program planners, clinicians, and policy makers contribute to making new ideas deeply embedded in organizational structures can become an important mechanism of effective decision-making activities when health managers attempt to promote new plans and strategies.
PubMed ID
22387969 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the national nursing model and four nursing documentation systems in Finland--lessons learned and directions for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126473
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2012 Aug;81(8):507-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Pirkko Nykänen
Johanna Kaipio
Anne Kuusisto
Author Affiliation
School of Information Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. Pirkko.Nykanen@uta.fi
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2012 Aug;81(8):507-20
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Documentation
Finland
Humans
Learning
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Models, Nursing
Nursing Informatics
Nursing Records
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To evaluate the feasibility of the national nursing model and usability of four widely used nursing documentation systems and to study their usefulness in multi-professional collaboration and information exchange.
Qualitative usability study methods were used, including the use of scenario walkthroughs, contextual inquiries, thematic interviews and inspection-based expert reviews in the users' clinical contexts.
The nursing process model was shown to be feasible in nursing practice but the national nursing classification was considered too detailed, multi-layered and difficult to use and understand. The four evaluated nursing documentation systems had many usability problems which resulted in them being difficult to use and produced extra documentation workload. Generally, electronic nursing documentation improves patients' and health professionals' legal protection and makes nursing care more transparent; however, the documentation systems did not provide good support for multi-professional care and information exchange.
Nursing models should comply better with nursing practices and support nurses in patient care and interventions. An essential improvement in practice would be the use of specific templates that are easy to apply in specific situations with homogeneous patient groups. Collaborative care aspects and better utilization of information require that the nursing model is designed to support not just documentation but also information utilization.
PubMed ID
22386236 View in PubMed
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Fidelity of after-school program implementation targeting adolescent youth: identifying successful curricular and programmatic characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126495
Source
J Sch Health. 2012 Apr;82(4):159-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Sonali Rajan
Charles E Basch
Author Affiliation
National Development and Research Institutes and Public Health Solutions, 71 West 23rd Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10010, USA. sr2345@columbia.edu
Source
J Sch Health. 2012 Apr;82(4):159-65
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Canada
Child
Curriculum
Decision Making
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Health Education - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Motor Activity
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
School Health Services - organization & administration - standards
United States
Abstract
This study consisted of a formative evaluation of an after-school health education program designed for adolescent females, entitled Girls on Track. Evidence-based after-school programs have potential to supplement the traditional school day, encourage social and emotional skill development, improve the quality of student health, and contribute to a healthier school environment. Implementing comprehensive programs outside of the classroom, however, is challenging and gaps exist in the literature regarding implementation fidelity.
The national program was in a cohort of adolescent females from 11 Girls on Track locations in fall 2008 and 10 locations in spring 2009. Mixed-method analyses evaluated fidelity of lesson implementation, described curricular and programmatic characteristics associated with implementation fidelity, and assessed coach perceptions toward program quality and feasibility.
Specific lesson characteristics associated with higher rates of implementation fidelity and favorable coach perceptions toward program feasibility included improved lesson clarity, more time to process health topics, teaching and learning objectives that were well aligned with lesson activities, incorporation of alternative activities for less-motivated participants, and provision of resources on key health topics for coaches.
Girls on Track is currently being implemented across the United States and Canada, reaching over 5000 adolescent females annually. Identifying and incorporating specific curricular and programmatic characteristics associated with high levels of implementation fidelity can enhance the quality and benefits of after-school programs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22385088 View in PubMed
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Legitimising and rationalising in talk about satisfaction with formal healthcare among bereaved family members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126497
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2012 Sep;34(7):1010-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Laura M Funk
Kelli I Stajduhar
S. Robin Cohen
Daren K Heyland
Allison Williams
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. funklm@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2012 Sep;34(7):1010-24
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Canada
Decision Making
Family - psychology
Family Health - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Rationalization
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminal Care - psychology - standards
Abstract
While there is a fair amount of knowledge regarding substantive features of end of life care that family members desire and appreciate, we lack full understanding of the process whereby family members formulate care evaluations. In this article we draw on an analysis of interview data from 24 bereaved family members to explicate how they interpret their experiences and formulate evaluations of end of life care services. Most participants wove between expressing and legitimising dissatisfaction, and qualifying or diffusing it. This occurred through processes of comparisons against prior care experiences and expectations, personalising (drawing on personal situations and knowledge), collectivising (drawing on conversations with and observations of others) and attempting to understand causes for their negative care experiences and to attribute responsibility. The findings suggest that dissatisfaction might be diffused even where care is experienced negatively, primarily through the acknowledgement of mitigating circumstances. To a lesser extent, some participants attributed responsibility to the 'system' (policy and decision-makers) and individual staff members. The findings are discussed in relation to the theoretical understanding of satisfaction and evaluation processes and how satisfaction data might inform improvements to care quality.
PubMed ID
22384989 View in PubMed
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3207 records – page 1 of 321.