Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1744 records – page 1 of 175.

Developing and validating the French-Canadian version of the practitioner and organizational telehealth readiness assessment tools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144267
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2010;16(3):140-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Emilie Légaré
Claude Vincent
Pascale Lehoux
Donna Anderson
Dahlia Kairy
Marie-Pierre Gagnon
Penny Jennett
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation, Laval University, Pavillon Ferdinand Vandry, Quebec City, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada.
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2010;16(3):140-6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Innovation
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Only one telehealth readiness assessment tool, that of Jennett et al., covers all types of telehealth projects, regardless of health-care provision context. However, this instrument is only available in English and has not undergone psychometric evaluation. We developed a French-Canadian version of the Practitioner Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool and the Organizational Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool. Transcultural validity was assessed by nine practitioners and 12 clinical project co-ordinators or administrators. For practitioners and managers, there was no significant difference between the scores of the English and the French versions of the questionnaires. The results showed that the telehealth readiness of co-ordinators or administrators was greater than that of practitioners when the range in scores was taken into account. The French-Canadian versions of the two questionnaires make it possible to assess telehealth readiness among French speakers. However, other studies involving patients will be necessary to validate the Patient-Public Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool.
Notes
Comment In: J Telemed Telecare. 2010;16(3):107-920386031
PubMed ID
20386034 View in PubMed
Less detail

The prognosis and incidence of social phobia in an elderly population. A 5-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144285
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Jul;122(1):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
B. Karlsson
R. Sigström
M. Waern
S. Ostling
D. Gustafson
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. karlsson.bjorn@gmail.com
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Jul;122(1):4-10
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the prognosis and incidence of social fears and phobia in an elderly population sample followed for 5 years.
A general population sample (N = 612) of non-demented men (baseline age 70) and women (baseline age 70 and 78-86) was investigated in 2000-2001 and in 2005-2006 with semi-structured psychiatric examinations including the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Social phobia was diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria.
Among nine individuals with DSM-IV social phobia in 2000, 5 (55.6%) had no social fears in 2005, and 1 (11.1%) still met the criteria for DSM-IV social phobia. Among individuals without DSM-IV social phobia in 2000 (N = 603), 12 (2.0%) had DSM-IV social phobia in 2005.
These findings challenge the notion that social phobia is a chronic disorder with rare occurrence in old age.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Jul;122(1):1-320597874
PubMed ID
20384601 View in PubMed
Less detail

Work arrangements, physical working conditions, and psychosocial working conditions as risk factors for sickness absence: Bayesian analysis of prospective data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144310
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2010 May;20(5):332-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Mikko Laaksonen
Janne Pitkäniemi
Ossi Rahkonen
Eero Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. mikko.t.laaksonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2010 May;20(5):332-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To determine which work arrangements, physical working conditions, and psychosocial working conditions are important risk factors for sickness absence.
Survey data on working conditions collected among the employees of the City of Helsinki during 2000 to 2002 (N = 6503, response rate 67%) were linked to the employer's sickness absence records for the subsequent 3 years. First occurrences of short-term (1-3 days), intermediate (4-14 days), and long-term (15 days or more) sickness absence episodes were examined by the use of proportional hazards models with Bayesian model averaging.
Working overtime decreased the risk of short-term sickness absence by 19%. Heavy physical work load and hazardous exposures were consistently associated with increased sickness absence episodes of all lengths. The risk of intermediate and long-term absence episodes was increased by 24% to 28% per one standard deviation increase in physical work load. Low job control in women and job dissatisfaction in men increased the risk of sickness absence episodes of all lengths.
Heavy physical work load and hazardous exposures had the strongest associations with sickness absence. Furthermore, low job control in women and job dissatisfaction in men were consistently associated with increased risk of sickness absence. Systematic differences in risk factors for absence episodes of different lengths were not found.
PubMed ID
20382333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Examination of the multifactorial model of delirium among long-term care residents with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144313
Source
Geriatr Nurs. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):105-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
Philippe Voyer
Sylvie Richard
Lise Doucet
Nancy Cyr
Pierre-Hugues Carmichael
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing of Laval University, and Centre for Excellence on Aging - Research Unit, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Geriatr Nurs. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):105-14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dementia - complications
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Models, Statistical
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The multifactorial model of delirium was developed to explain the interrelationship between predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium. Although validated among hospitalized patients, this model has never been tested among long-term care residents with dementia. We undertook this secondary data analysis to investigate the combined effect of predisposing and precipitating factors on the likelihood of having delirium among this population. Delirium was defined as meeting the Confusion Assessment Method criteria for definite or probable delirium. Risk factors considered in the study were those found significantly associated with delirium in the original study. Participants (N=155) were classified into risk groups. Prevalence of delirium for the low, moderate, and high predisposing risk groups were 32%, 78.4%, and 98.1%, respectively, and 37.9%, 67.2%, and 86.8% for the precipitating factors risk groups. When both variables were included in the same model, only predisposing factors remained statistically associated with delirium. Predisposing factors play a key role in the likelihood of having delirium among this population. Increased awareness of these factors among nurses could improve the care of these residents by targeting modifiable risk factors.
PubMed ID
20381711 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing safety culture in pharmacies: the psychometric validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in a national sample of community pharmacies in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144322
Source
BMC Clin Pharmacol. 2010;10:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Annika Nordén-Hägg
J Bryan Sexton
Sofia Kälvemark-Sporrong
Lena Ring
Asa Kettis-Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. annikanordn.h@telia.com
Source
BMC Clin Pharmacol. 2010;10:8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Organizational Culture
Pharmacies - standards
Pharmacists - psychology - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Students, Pharmacy - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Safety culture assessment is increasingly recognized as an important component in healthcare quality improvement, also in pharmacies. One of the most commonly used and rigorously validated tools to measure safety culture is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; SAQ. This study presents the validation of the SAQ for use in Swedish pharmacies. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented
The original English language version of the SAQ was translated and adapted to the Swedish context and distributed by e-mail. The survey was carried out on a national basis, covering all 870 Swedish community pharmacies. In total, 7,244 questionnaires were distributed. Scale psychometrics were analysed using Cronbach alphas and intercorrelations among the scales. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted.
SAQ data from 828 community pharmacies in Sweden, including 4,090 (60.22%) pharmacy personnel out of 6,683 eligible respondents, were received. There were 252 (28.97%) pharmacies that met the inclusion criteria of having at least 5 respondents and a minimum response rate of 60% within that pharmacy.The coefficient alpha value for each of the SAQ scales ranged from .72 to .89. The internal consistency results, in conjunction with the confirmatory factor analysis results, demonstrate that the Swedish translation of the SAQ has acceptable to good psychometric properties. Perceptions of the pharmacy (Teamwork Climate, Job Satisfaction, Perceptions of Management, Safety Climate, and Working Conditions) were moderately to highly correlated with one another whereas attitudes about stress (Stress Recognition) had only low correlations with other factors. Perceptions of management showed the most variability across pharmacies (SD = 26.66), whereas Stress Recognition showed the least (SD = 18.58). There was substantial variability ranging from 0% to 100% in the percent of positive scores for each of the factors across the 252 pharmacies.
The Swedish translation of the SAQ demonstrates acceptable construct validity, for capturing the frontline perspective of safety culture of community pharmacy staff. The psychometric results reported here met or exceeded standard guidelines, which is consistent with previous studies using the SAQ in other healthcare settings and other languages.
Notes
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Apr;12(2):112-812679507
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2009 Feb;18(1):28-3119204128
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Dec;12 Suppl 2:ii17-2314645891
Cites: Value Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;8(2):94-10415804318
Cites: Pharm World Sci. 2005 Jun;27(3):223-916096892
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2005 Oct;14(5):364-616195571
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2006 Apr;15(2):109-1516585110
Cites: Ergonomics. 2006 Apr 15-May 15;49(5-6):503-1616717007
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:4416584553
Cites: J Perinatol. 2006 Aug;26(8):463-7016775621
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Jul;32(7):407-10, 35716884128
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2006 Aug;41(4 Pt 2):1599-61716898981
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Aug;32(8):433-4216955862
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2006 Nov;105(5):877-8417065879
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2007 Jan;35(1):165-7617110876
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Jan;22(1):1-517351834
Cites: Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2007;20(7):620-3218030963
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2007 Nov;33(11):699-703, 64518074719
Cites: J Crit Care. 2008 Jun;23(2):207-2118538214
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:19118808693
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 May;200(5):492.e1-819249729
PubMed ID
20380741 View in PubMed
Less detail

The epidemiology of weight perception: perceived versus self-reported actual weight status among Albertan adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144471
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):56-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jordana Linder
Lindsay McLaren
Geraldine Lo Siou
Ilona Csizmadi
Paula J Robson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. jdlinder@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):56-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Body Image
Body mass index
Body Weight
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Sex Factors
Social Perception
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To understand, prevent, and manage weight-related health issues, researchers and clinicians rely on the ability to identify those at risk. Prevention and management strategies may also rely on accurate self-perception of weight and body composition in the general population.
We analyzed data from The Tomorrow Project (n = 7,436), a prospective cohort study enrolling adults aged 35-69 years, in Alberta, Canada. Weight perception accuracy was defined based on body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and a combined (BMI and WC) risk profile.
The majority of participants correctly perceived themselves as overweight. Women were more accurate than men in identifying themselves as overweight. In terms of inaccuracy, more normal-weight women than men perceived themselves to be overweight, while more overweight men than women perceived themselves as about the right weight. When using the combined risk profile, all men with normal weight (BMI) but higher risk WC perceived their weight as about right whereas just under half of men who were overweight (BMI) but lower risk WC perceived their weight as about right. For women, a much higher proportion recognized their weight status as overweight when only BMI was elevated compared to when only WC indicated higher risk.
Adults in our sample showed reasonable accuracy in weight perception. Gender differences reveal that women were more accurate than men in identifying themselves as overweight. Incongruence between weight status indicators was noted, indicating the importance of using both BMI and waist circumference as health status measures.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101(4):345; author reply 34521033552
PubMed ID
20364540 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity and reliability of a multiple-group measurement scale for interprofessional collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144573
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kenaszchuk
Scott Reeves
David Nicholas
Merrick Zwarenstein
Author Affiliation
Keenan Research Centre in Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. kenaszchukc@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:83
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Nurses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient care team
Physician-Nurse Relations
Proxy
Psychometrics
Abstract
Many measurement scales for interprofessional collaboration are developed for one health professional group, typically nurses. Evaluating interprofessional collaborative relationships can benefit from employing a measurement scale suitable for multiple health provider groups, including physicians and other health professionals. To this end, the paper begins development of a new interprofessional collaboration measurement scale designed for use with nurses, physicians, and other professionals practicing in contemporary acute care settings. The paper investigates validity and reliability of data from nurses evaluating interprofessional collaboration of physicians and shows initial results for other rater/target combinations.
Items from a published scale originally designed for nurses were adapted to a round robin proxy report format appropriate for multiple health provider groups. Registered nurses, physicians, and allied health professionals practicing in inpatient wards/services of 15 community and academic hospitals in Toronto, Canada completed the adapted scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of responses to the adapted scale examined dimensionality, construct and concurrent validity, and reliability of nurses' response data. Correlations between the adapted scale, the nurse-physician relations subscale of the Nursing Work Index, and the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale were calculated. Differences of mean scores on the Nursing Work Index and the interprofessional collaboration scale were compared between hospitals.
Exploratory factor analysis revealed 3 factors in the adapted interprofessional collaboration scale - labeled Communication, Accommodation, and Isolation - which were subsequently corroborated by confirmatory factor analysis. Nurses' scale responses about physician collaboration had convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity, and acceptable reliability.
The new scale is suitable for use with nurses assessing physicians. The scale may yield valid and reliable data from physicians and others, but measurement equivalence and other properties of the scale should be investigated before it is used with multiple health professional groups.
Notes
Cites: Nurs Res. 2000 May-Jun;49(3):146-5310882319
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2009 Mar;14(1):6-2319271845
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2003 Mar;31(3):956-912627011
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Apr;12(2):112-812679507
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1967 Jun;16(6):699-7036027368
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1990 Mar;107(2):238-462320703
Cites: Exp Aging Res. 1992 Autumn-Winter;18(3-4):117-441459160
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 1995 Dec;32(6):612-278926161
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Oct;45(7):1135-89257405
Cites: Eval Health Prof. 1999 Mar;22(1):123-4210350960
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1959 Mar;56(2):81-10513634291
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2004 Dec;16(6):491-715557359
Cites: J Nurs Adm. 2005 May;35(5):244-5315891488
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2006 May;202(5):746-5216648014
Cites: J Allied Health. 2006 Summer;35(2):109-1516848375
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2006 Aug;55(3):330-4116866827
Cites: Med Care. 2006 Nov;44(11 Suppl 3):S39-4917060834
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2006 Nov;105(5):877-8417065879
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2007 Feb;30(1):31-4417243106
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2007 Mar;98(3):347-5217272386
Cites: Med Care Res Rev. 2007 Apr;64(2 Suppl):104S-22S17406014
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2008 Mar;15(1):1-218271784
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2002 Jun;25(3):176-8812015780
PubMed ID
20353577 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of life assessed with Short Form 36 – a comparison between two populations with long-term musculoskeletal pain disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144641
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(23):1903-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Birgitta Peilot
Paulin Andréll
Kaisa Mannerkorpi
Clas Mannheimer
Author Affiliation
Consulting Psychiatry, Drottninggatan 1, Mariestad SE-542 34, Sweden. birgittapeilot@hotmail.com
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(23):1903-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain - psychology - rehabilitation
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess quality of life (QoL) in two groups of patients with long-term musculoskeletal pain with and without psychiatric co-morbidity and to compare them with a reference group of normative controls. The patients in both study groups were sick-listed full or part time for 3 months or more.
The patients were recruited from a company health service and consulting psychiatry. A generic QoL questionnaire, the SF-36, was used to assess QoL. Each group was compared with age- and gender-matched normative controls.
Both groups reported a pronounced impairment of QoL (p
PubMed ID
20345250 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Norwegian version of the Experiences in Close Relationships measure of adult attachment: psychometric properties and normative data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144660
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;64(5):340-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Ingrid Olssøn
Øystein Sørebø
Alv A Dahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Innlandet Hospital Trust, N-2318 Hamar, Norway. ingrid.olsson@sykehuset-innlandet.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;64(5):340-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Object Attachment
Psychological Tests - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Self-report questionnaires have facilitated attachment research, and validation of these instruments in different languages and cultures has become of importance. The Experiences in Close Relationships measure (ECR) is a well-established and suitable tool for cross-cultural comparisons of adult attachment.
The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the ECR and to develop a shorter version. We also investigated the associations between socio-demographic characteristics and attachment styles as measured by the ECR on the anxiety and avoidance subscales.
Data were anonymously collected by a mailed questionnaire to young adults aged 30, 40 and 45 years. With a response rate of 29%, 437 individuals were included. Exploratory factor analysis was performed and confirmatory factor analysis was done by structural equation modelling.
The psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the ECR were satisfying and comparable with the properties reported by other translations. Individuals who scored low on both avoidance and anxiety scales were more likely to live in paired relations, have paid work, rate themselves with good health and in general be more satisfied with their lives. A new 12 item short version of the ECR showed good psychometric properties and similar associations to socio-demographic variables. Taking into account its brevity and feasibility further research on attachment style with ECR in clinical samples should be performed.
PubMed ID
20337569 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia is associated with anxiety among adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144773
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Sep;125(1-3):383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Max Karukivi
Lea Hautala
Olli Kaleva
Kirsi-Maria Haapasalo-Pesu
Pirjo-Riitta Liuksila
Matti Joukamaa
Simo Saarijärvi
Author Affiliation
Unit of Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland. max.karukivi@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Sep;125(1-3):383-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Eating Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between alexithymia and anxiety in a non-clinical sample of late adolescents.
The questionnaire was sent to 935 adolescents of whom 729 (78%) responded, thus forming the final sample. The mean age of the subjects was 19 years (range 17-21 years). The Finnish versions of the following scales were used: the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) was used to assess alexithymia, and anxiety symptoms were measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Alcohol consumption was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and depression symptoms were evaluated using the short form of the Beck Depression Inventory, as modified by Raitasalo (RBDI).
The prevalence of alexithymia in the sample was 8.2%, with no statistically significant gender difference. The alexithymic subjects had significantly (p
PubMed ID
20303180 View in PubMed
Less detail

1744 records – page 1 of 175.