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Community-based participatory research in a large cohort study of chronic diseases among Alaska Native adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99825
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2010;4(4):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Diana Redwood
Anne Lanier
Melissa Kemberling
Joseph Klejka
Ileen Sylvester
Kari Lundgren
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2010;4(4):325-30
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Epidemiology
Capacity building
Organization & administration
Chronic Disease
Ethnology
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American
Information Dissemination
Inuits
Patient Selection
Prospective Studies
Research Design
Risk factors
Abstract
Background: In 2001, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded a project to develop methods to recruit American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adults for a prospective cohort study of chronic disease risk and protective factors.Objective: We describe how the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles led to more effective study design and implementation in a study in Alaska.Methods: CBPR elements included collaboration between researchers and tribes at all stages of the project, capacity building through training AI/AN staff in research methods, and knowledge dissemination through presentations, newsletters, and individual and community health feedback based on results of the study.Results: Between March 2004 and August 2006, 3,821 AI/ AN adults from 26 Alaskan communities enrolled in the study. Retention in the study is high, with over 88% of participants successfully completing a 2-year follow-up questionnaire.Conclusion: CBPR methods have facilitated effective development of study methods, recruitment and retention. Efforts are on-going to continue work with this unique AI/AN research participant community.
PubMed ID
21169710 View in PubMed
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Serum ß-carotene in relation to risk of prostate cancer: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126133
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2012 Apr;64(3):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Jouni Karppi
Sudhir Kurl
Jari A Laukkanen
Jussi Kauhanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. jouni.karppi@uef.fi
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2012 Apr;64(3):361-7
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Cholesterol - blood
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking
Vitamin A - blood
alpha-Linolenic Acid - blood
alpha-Tocopherol - blood
beta Carotene - blood
Abstract
Results from epidemiologic studies on the association between circulating carotenoid concentrations and the risk of prostate cancer are still inconsistent. We studied whether serum concentrations of carotenoids were associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer. The study population consisted of 997 middle-aged Finnish men (56.1 ± 6.6 yr) in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) cohort. Serum concentrations of carotenoids were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Subjects were classified into tertiles according to their serum concentrations of antioxidants. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated by using the Cox proportional hazard models. During the mean follow-up time of 15 yr, a total of 68 prostate cancer cases occurred. After adjusting for age, examination yr, family history of cancer, BMI, pack-yr of smoking, alcohol consumption, education, physical activity, serum total cholesterol, and serum a-linolenic acid, men in the highest tertile of serum concentrations of ß-carotene had 2.3-fold higher risk of prostate cancer as compared to those in the lowest tertile (RR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.12-4.66; P = 0.023). a-Tocopherol and retinol were not associated with prostate cancer. This prospective study suggests that high-serum ß-carotene concentrations may increase the risk of prostate cancer in middle-aged men.
PubMed ID
22420939 View in PubMed
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Prospective study of human papillomavirus seropositivity and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126154
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr 1;175(7):685-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2012
Author
Kristin Andersson
Kristina M Michael
Tapio Luostarinen
Tim Waterboer
Randi Gislefoss
Timo Hakulinen
Ola Forslund
Michael Pawlita
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr 1;175(7):685-95
Date
Apr-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in case-control studies, but there are limited data from prospective studies assessing whether virus exposure predicts risk of future cancer development. Two major biobanks, the Southern Sweden Microbiology Biobank (1971-2003) and the Janus Biobank (1973-2003) in Norway, containing samples from 850,000 donors, were searched for incident skin cancer for up to 30 years using registry linkages. Altogether, 2,623 donors with samples taken before diagnosis of SCC or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin were identified. Prediagnostic samples and samples from 2,623 matched controls were tested for antibodies against 33 types of HPV. Baseline seropositivity to HPV types in genus ß species 2 was associated with SCC risk (odds ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.7); this was also the case for samples taken more than 18 years before diagnosis (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.8). Type-specific persistent seropositivity entailed elevated point estimates for SCC risk for 29 HPV types and decreased point estimates for only 3 types. After multiple hypothesis adjustment, HPV 76 was significantly associated with SCC risk and HPV 9 with BCC risk. In summary, seropositivity for certain HPV types was associated with an increased risk for future development of SCC and BCC.
PubMed ID
22419740 View in PubMed
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Congruence between preferred and actual place of care and death among Danish cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126157
Source
Palliat Med. 2013 Feb;27(2):155-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Trine Brogaard
Mette A Neergaard
Ineta Sokolowski
Frede Olesen
Anders B Jensen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice and Department of Family Medicine, Aarhus University, School of Public Health, Denmark. trine.brogaard@alm.au.dk
Source
Palliat Med. 2013 Feb;27(2):155-64
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Death
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - psychology
Patient Preference
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Terminal Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Meeting patient's preferences is an important outcome in palliative care. No Scandinavian study has reported systematically collected preferences from patients regarding place of care (POC) and place of death (POD). The extent of possible incongruence between patients' preferences and reality remains unknown.
The aim of this study was to describe patients' preferred POC and POD and changes in preferences over time and to evaluate congruence between preferences and reality. Furthermore, the aim was to search for predictive factors regarding patients' wishes and fulfilment of these.
This is a prospective interview and questionnaire study.
The study was conducted in the former Aarhus County, Denmark and 96 end-stage cancer patients participated.
Of the patients, who stated a preference, 84% preferred home care and 71% preferred home death. A positive association between living with a partner and both wishing for home care and home death was observed (prevalence ratio (PR): 1.66 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.07, 2.58), p = 0.02 and PR: 2.33 (95% CI: 1.14, 4.77), p = 0.02, respectively). Marked changes in preferences were observed. Overall, preferences were met for approximately half of the patients, although kappa values were low (?=0.132 for POC and ?=0.034 for POD).We found a significant association between being cared for in the preferred place and having contact with a palliative care team (PR: 2.01 (95% CI: 1.02, 3.98), p = 0.045).
Regular discussions with patients on this subject are needed. Social and professional support is of importance in meeting patients' preferences. Larger scaled studies and research focusing on meeting patients' preferences are needed.
PubMed ID
22419677 View in PubMed
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Ontario children have outgrown the Broselow tape.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126167
Source
CJEM. 2012 Jan;14(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
William Ken Milne
Abeer Yasin
Janine Knight
Daniel Noel
Richard Lubell
Guido Filler
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
CJEM. 2012 Jan;14(1):25-30
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry - instrumentation
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Growth and development
Humans
Infant
Male
Ontario
Physical Examination - instrumentation - trends
Prospective Studies
Rural Population
Statistics, nonparametric
Urban Population
Abstract
The Broselow Pediatric Emergency Tape (Armstrong Medical Industries, Inc., Lincolnshire, IL) (BT) is a well-established length-based tool for estimation of body weight for children during resuscitation. In view of pandemic childhood obesity, the BT may no longer accurately estimate weight. We therefore studied the BT in children from Ontario in a large recent patient cohort.
Actual height and weight were obtained from an urban and a rural setting. Children were prospectively recruited between April 2007 and July 2008 from the emergency department and outpatient clinics at the London Health Science Centre. Rural children from junior kindergarten to grade 4 were also recruited in the spring of 2008 from the Avon Maitland District School Board. Data for preschool children were obtained from three daycare centres and the electronic medical record from the Maitland Valley Medical Centre. The predicted weight from the BT was compared to the actual weight using Spearman rank correlation; agreement and percent error (PE) were also calculated.
A total of 6,361 children (46.2% female) were included in the study. The median age was 3.9 years (interquartile range [IQR] 1.56-7.67 years), weight was 17.2 kg (IQR 11.6-25.4 kg), and height was 103.5 cm (IQR 82-124.4 cm). Although the BT weight estimate correlated with the actual weight (r ?=? 0.95577, p
PubMed ID
22417954 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in chiropractic practice in Denmark: a descriptive cross-sectional and prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126172
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Erik Poulsen
Henrik W Christensen
Søren Overgaard
Jan Hartvigsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e.poulsen@nikkb.dk
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):263-71
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Chiropractic
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - radiography
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered by the chiropractic practitioner.
A total of 2000 patient records and 1000 radiographs were reviewed retrospectively in 20 chiropractic clinics throughout Denmark. Information obtained included patients' primary complaint, physical examination and radiographic findings of hip OA, and treatment. Subsequently, the 20 clinics participated in a prospective survey where they collected equivalent information over a 2-week period.
Retrospective review of records revealed that 1.4% of patients in Danish chiropractic practice had signs of clinical hip OA. Of these, 59% demonstrated radiographic signs of hip OA. Prospective data collection revealed that 3.4% of new patients had signs of clinical hip OA. Fifty-four percent of these demonstrated radiographic signs of hip OA, and of these 70% were diagnosed as having OA of the hip for the first time. Initial treatment involved manual treatment and advice on over-the-counter pain medication and/or supplements. Of all 1000 retrospectively reviewed radiographs in patients 40 years or older, 19.2% demonstrated radiographic signs of hip OA.
Osteoarthritis of the hip is diagnosed and managed in primary care chiropractic practice in Denmark; however, it is likely underdiagnosed. In those newly presenting to chiropractic practitioners, first-time diagnosis with clinical and radiographic signs of hip OA appears to be common.
PubMed ID
22417795 View in PubMed
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Diet quality and mental health in subsequent years among Canadian youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126206
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Seanna E McMartin
Stefan Kuhle
Ian Colman
Sara F L Kirk
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2253-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Diet - standards
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental health
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
To examine the association between diet quality and the diagnosis of an internalizing disorder in children and adolescents.
A prospective study examining the relationship between diet quality and mental health. FFQ responses of 3757 children were used to calculate a composite score for diet quality and its four components: variety, adequacy, moderation and balance. Physicians' diagnoses on internalizing disorders were obtained by linking the children's dietary information to administrative health data. Negative binomial regression models were used to examine the association between diet quality and diagnosis of an internalizing disorder.
The Canadian province of Nova Scotia.
A provincially representative sample of grade 5 students (age 10-11 years).
Diet quality was not found to be associated with internalizing disorder in a statistically significant manner (incidence rate ratio = 1.09; 95 % CI 0.73, 1.63). However, relative to children with little variety in their diets, children with greater variety in their diet had statistically significant lower rates of internalizing disorder in subsequent years (incidence rate ratio = 0.45; 95 % CI 0.25, 0.82).
These findings suggest the importance of variety in children's diet and opportunities in the prevention of adolescent depression and anxiety.
PubMed ID
22414240 View in PubMed
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Measurement equivalence of the SF-36 in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126207
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:29
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa M Lix
Beliz Acan Osman
Jonathan D Adachi
Tanveer Towheed
Wilma Hopman
K Shawn Davison
William D Leslie
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. lisa.lix@usask.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:29
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Fractures, Spontaneous - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life
Reference Standards
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Studies that compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes in different populations rest on the assumption that the measure has equivalent psychometric properties across groups. This study examined the measurement equivalence (ME) of the 36-item Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Survey (SF-36), a widely-used measure of HRQOL, by sex and race in a population-based Canadian sample.
SF-36 data were from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study, a prospective cohort study that randomly sampled adult men and women from nine sites across Canada. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) techniques were used to test hypotheses about four forms of ME, which are based on equality of the factor loadings, variances, covariances, and intercepts. Analyses were conducted for Caucasian and non-Caucasian females (n = 6,539) and males (n = 2,884). CFA results revealed that a measurement model with physical and mental health factors provided a good fit to the data. All forms of ME were satisfied for the study groups.
The results suggest that sex and race do not influence the conceptualization of a general measure of HRQOL in the Canadian population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22414200 View in PubMed
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Human parechoviruses are frequently detected in stool of healthy Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126259
Source
J Clin Virol. 2012 Jun;54(2):156-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Pekka Kolehmainen
Sami Oikarinen
Marjaleena Koskiniemi
Olli Simell
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Heikki Hyöty
Sisko Tauriainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Clin Virol. 2012 Jun;54(2):156-61
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carrier State - epidemiology - virology
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Feces - virology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Parechovirus - isolation & purification
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Viral Structural Proteins - genetics
Abstract
Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are common viruses mainly infecting young children. Most infections are mild, but HPeV3 causes severe CNS infections in new-born infants.
The aim was to study the epidemiology of HPeVs in Finnish general population in the period 1996-2007, with special emphasis on the different types circulating in Finland.
A total of 2236 stool specimens were collected from 200 healthy Finnish children in a prospective birth cohort study, most before the age of 2 years. Samples were tested for the presence of HPeV RNA using a specific RT-PCR. The genotype of HPeV was determined by sequencing the VP1 genomic region.
HPeV RNA was detected in 144 (6.4%) specimens from 78 (39%) children. The dominant type was HPeV1 (93% of the type-identified 105 samples), although types 3 and 6 were also identified. HPeV was found sequentially in more than one sample in 43 infections lasting up to 93 days. The positive findings were distributed equally in young ages and declined towards the age of 2 years. Infections clustered around the autumn months with no obvious change between years. No significant differences were seen between boys and girls.
HPeV is a common virus infecting Finnish children under 2 years of age. HPeVs circulate throughout the year with clear accumulation on autumn, also seen in individual years over the 11-year study period. The virus deserves increased attention and should be included in the test panel of clinical virus laboratories.
PubMed ID
22406272 View in PubMed
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Posttraumatic growth in coronary artery disease outpatients: relationship to degree of trauma and health service use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126272
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2012 Apr;72(4):293-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Yvonne W Leung
David A Alter
Peter L Prior
Donna E Stewart
Jane Irvine
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
York University, Canada. yvonnewleung@gmail.com
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2012 Apr;72(4):293-9
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Cohort Studies
Continuity of Patient Care
Coronary Artery Disease - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personality Development
Prospective Studies
Recurrence - prevention & control
Sick Role
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology
Utilization Review
Abstract
Posttraumatic growth (PTG) is frequently reported after the strike of a serious medical illness. The current study sought to: 1) assess the relationship between degree of cardiac "threat" and PTG one-year post-hospitalization; and 2) to explore the association between PTG and healthcare utilization.
In a cohort study, 2636 cardiac inpatients from 11 Ontario hospitals completed a sociodemographic survey; clinical data were extracted from charts. One year later, 1717 of these outpatients completed a postal survey, which assessed PTG and healthcare utilization. Morbidity data were obtained retrospectively through probabilistic linkage to administrative data. The predicted risk of recurrent events for each participant was calculated using a logistic regression model, based on participants' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. The relationship among PTG, trauma and health service use was examined with multiple regression models.
Greater PTG was significantly related to greater predicted risk of recurrent events (p
PubMed ID
22405224 View in PubMed
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16994 records – page 1 of 1700.