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IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer in young women: a pooled re-analysis of three prospective studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16638
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Dec;14(6):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Sabina Rinaldi
Paolo Toniolo
Paola Muti
Eva Lundin
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Alan Arslan
Andrea Micheli
Per Lenner
Laure Dossus
Vittorio Krogh
Roy E Shore
Karen L Koenig
Elio Riboli
Pär Stattin
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Annekatrin Lukanova
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon, Cedex 08, France.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Dec;14(6):493-6
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Italy
Middle Aged
New York
Premenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Prospective cohort studies on breast cancer risk among premenopausal women and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations have so far included only few cases, and have shown inconsistent relative risk estimates. We pooled 220 cases of breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, and 434 control subjects, from three prospective studies in New York (USA), Umeå (Northern Sweden) and Milan (Italy), and we measured IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) with common enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Overall, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements obtained by the common method showed a positive but not significant relationship with breast cancer risk (odds ratios (ORs) 0.90 [95% confidence intervals (95% CI) 0.50-1.62], 1.63 [0.89-2.97], 1.46 [0.78-2.73] and 1.41 [0.75-2.63] for quintiles of IGF-I, and ORs 0.98 [0.54-1.75], 1.06 [0.59-1.91], 1.04 [0.58-1.87] and 1.77 [0.97-3.24] for quintiles of IGFBP-3). Our results give only moderate support for an association of blood IGF-I with breast cancer risk in young women.
PubMed ID
16284492 View in PubMed
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Genetic Polymorphisms in Vitamin D Metabolism and Signaling Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273889
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(10):e0140478
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tess V Clendenen
Wenzhen Ge
Karen L Koenig
Tomas Axelsson
Mengling Liu
Yelena Afanasyeva
Anne Andersson
Alan A Arslan
Yu Chen
Göran Hallmans
Per Lenner
Tomas Kirchhoff
Eva Lundin
Roy E Shore
Malin Sund
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(10):e0140478
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase - genetics
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - blood - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase - genetics
Cohort Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Middle Aged
Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Retinoid X Receptor alpha - genetics
Signal Transduction - genetics
Sweden
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics
Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase - genetics
Abstract
Genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D metabolism and signaling genes have been inconsistently associated with risk of breast cancer, though few studies have examined SNPs in vitamin D-related genes other than the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and particularly have not examined the association with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA) gene which may be a key vitamin D pathway gene. We conducted a nested case-control study of 734 cases and 1435 individually matched controls from a population-based prospective cohort study, the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Tag and functional SNPs were genotyped for the VDR, cytochrome p450 24A1 (CYP24A1), and RXRA genes. We also genotyped specific SNPs in four other genes related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling (GC/VDBP, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP27B1). SNPs in the CYP2R1, DHCR7, and VDBP gene regions that were associated with circulating 25(OH)D concentration in GWAS were also associated with plasma 25(OH)D in our study (p-trend
Notes
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PubMed ID
26488576 View in PubMed
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Consumption of filtered and boiled coffee and the risk of incident cancer: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143206
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Lenner
Bernt Lindahl
Bethany Van Guelpen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-44
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cooking
Drinking
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite potentially relevant chemical differences between filtered and boiled coffee, this study is the first to investigate consumption in relation to the risk of incident cancer.
Subjects were from the Västerbotten Intervention Project (64,603 participants, including 3,034 cases), with up to 15 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by multivariate Cox regression.
No associations were found for all cancer sites combined, or for prostate or colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, boiled coffee =4 versus
PubMed ID
20512657 View in PubMed
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Interactive effect of genetic susceptibility with height, body mass index, and hormone replacement therapy on the risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123175
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2012;12:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sophia Harlid
Salma Butt
Malin I L Ivarsson
Jorunn Erla Eyfjörd
Per Lenner
Jonas Manjer
Joakim Dillner
Joyce Carlson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2012;12:17
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Height
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - etiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotyping Techniques
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Iceland
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Sweden
Abstract
Breast cancer today has many established risk factors, both genetic and environmental, but these risk factors by themselves explain only part of the total cancer incidence. We have investigated potential interactions between certain known genetic and phenotypic risk factors, specifically nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and height, body mass index (BMI) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
We analyzed samples from three different study populations: two prospectively followed Swedish cohorts and one Icelandic case-control study. Totally 2884 invasive breast cancer cases and 4508 controls were analysed in the study. Genotypes were determined using Mass spectrometry-Maldi-TOF and phenotypic variables were derived from measurements and/or questionnaires. Odds Ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using unconditional logistic regression with the inclusion of an interaction term in the logistic regression model.
One SNP (rs851987 in ESR1) tended to interact with height, with an increasingly protective effect of the major allele in taller women (p = 0.007) and rs13281615 (on 8q24) tended to confer risk only in non users of HRT (p-for interaction = 0.03). There were no significant interactions after correction for multiple testing.
We conclude that much larger sample sets would be necessary to demonstrate interactions between low-risk genetic polymorphisms and the phenotypic variables height, BMI and HRT on the risk for breast cancer. However the present hypothesis-generating study has identified tendencies that would be of interest to evaluate for gene-environment interactions in independent materials.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22726230 View in PubMed
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Plasma leptin and breast cancer risk: a prospective study in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17347
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2004 Aug;86(3):191-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Pär Stattin
Stefan Söderberg
Carine Biessy
Per Lenner
Göran Hallmans
Rudolf Kaaks
Tommy Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology and Andrology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2004 Aug;86(3):191-6
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Leptin - blood
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Obesity is associated with risk of breast cancer after menopause. Circulating levels of leptin are high in obesity and leptin stimulates growth of breast cancer cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a case-control study nested within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort, we measured leptin levels in prediagnostic plasma from 149 postmenopausal women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at a mean time 1.7 years (SD 2.0) after recruitment and among 258 control subjects. RESULTS: No significant association between plasma levels of leptin and breast cancer risk was observed. Odds ratios (ORs) of breast cancer with increasing levels of leptin were 1.00 [referent], 1.01 [95% CI = 0.58-1.84], 0.65 [0.36-1.18], and 0.94 [0.53-1.67], and (p(for trend) = 0.54). Adjustment for smoking, body mass index, and plasma insulin did not affect risk estimates. DISCUSSION: These data do not support the hypothesis that plasma leptin is a risk factor for breast cancer.
PubMed ID
15567935 View in PubMed
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Smoking is associated with postmenopausal breast cancer in women with high levels of estrogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17519
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Nov 1;112(2):324-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2004
Author
Jonas Manjer
Robert Johansson
Per Lenner
Author Affiliation
Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, Departments of Community Medicine and Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. jonas.manjer@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Nov 1;112(2):324-8
Date
Nov-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Estradiol - blood
Estrone - blood
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated the association between smoking and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in groups defined by high levels of estrogens, a factor known to enhance tumour progression. Two prospective cohorts of Swedish women provided 260 postmenopausal breast cancer cases and 514 controls. Blood samples were collected at baseline, and anthropometry, life-style factors and reproductive history had been assessed. Subjects were classified into quartiles with regard to the level of estrone, and into three categories with regard to estradiol. All analyses of the relation between smoking and breast cancer were repeated in different categories of these hormones. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for matching factors, i.e., age at baseline, storage time and sub-cohort, yielded odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Ever-smoking was associated with breast cancer in the top category of estrone, 2.02 (1.17-3.49). The highest risk was seen among ex-smokers, 2.96 (1.53-5.75). The pattern was similar for estradiol. Recent smoking cessation was associated with a high OR in top categories of estrone, 4.38 (1.27-15.2) and estradiol 10.0 (1.14-88.7). Smoking initiation before the age of 20 was associated with breast cancer in the top category of estrone, 2.73 (1.27-5.91). Several potential confounders were introduced into the statistical model, but none remained using backward selection. We conclude that ever-smoking was associated with the risk of breast cancer in women with high levels of estrone, and that ex-smoking was associated with breast cancer in women with high levels of estrone or estradiol.
PubMed ID
15352047 View in PubMed
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Blood levels of cadmium and lead in relation to breast cancer risk in three prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299886
Source
Int J Cancer. 2019 03 01; 144(5):1010-1016
Publication Type
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Date
03-01-2019
Author
Mia M Gaudet
Emily L Deubler
Rachel S Kelly
W Ryan Diver
Lauren R Teras
James M Hodge
Keith E Levine
Laura G Haines
Thomas Lundh
Per Lenner
Domenico Palli
Paolo Vineis
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Susan M Gapstur
Soterios A Kyrtopoulos
Author Affiliation
Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2019 03 01; 144(5):1010-1016
Date
03-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - blood - etiology
Cadmium - blood
Carcinogens - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Italy
Lead - blood
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Cadmium and lead have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, their associations with breast cancer risk are unknown despite their persistence in the environment and ubiquitous human exposure. We examined associations of circulating levels of cadmium and lead with breast cancer risk in three case-control studies nested within the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II) LifeLink Cohort, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition - Italy (EPIC-Italy) and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS) cohorts. Metal levels were measured in stored erythrocytes from 1,435 cases and 1,433 controls using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random-effects models with each study result weighted by the within- and between-study variances. I2 values were calculated to estimate proportion of between study variation. Using common cut-points, cadmium levels were not associated with breast cancer risk in the CPS-II cohort (continuous RR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.76-1.34), but were inversely associated with risk in the EPIC- Italy (continuous RR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.61-1.03) and NSHDS cohorts (continuous RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.97). The inverse association was also evident in the meta-analysis (continuous RR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.69-1.01) with low between-study heterogeneity. Large differences in lead level distributions precluded a meta-analysis of their association with breast cancer risk; no associations were found in the three studies. Adult cadmium and lead levels were not associated with higher risk of breast cancer in our large meta-analysis.
PubMed ID
30117163 View in PubMed
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Low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet score and risk of incident cancer; a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261486
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Anna Winkvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Bernt Lindahl
Göran Hallmans
Per Lenner
Bethany Van Guelpen
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:58
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although carbohydrate reduction of varying degrees is a popular and controversial dietary trend, potential long-term effects for health, and cancer in specific, are largely unknown.
We studied a previously established low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) score in relation to the incidence of cancer and specific cancer types in a population-based cohort in northern Sweden. Participants were 62,582 men and women with up to 17.8 years of follow-up (median 9.7), including 3,059 prospective cancer cases. Cox regression analyses were performed for a LCHP score based on the sum of energy-adjusted deciles of carbohydrate (descending) and protein (ascending) intake labeled 1 to 10, with higher scores representing a diet lower in carbohydrates and higher in protein. Important potential confounders were accounted for, and the role of metabolic risk profile, macronutrient quality including saturated fat intake, and adequacy of energy intake reporting was explored.
For the lowest to highest LCHP scores, 2 to 20, carbohydrate intakes ranged from median 60.9 to 38.9% of total energy intake. Both protein (primarily animal sources) and particularly fat (both saturated and unsaturated) intakes increased with increasing LCHP scores. LCHP score was not related to cancer risk, except for a non-dose-dependent, positive association for respiratory tract cancer that was statistically significant in men. The multivariate hazard ratio for medium (9-13) versus low (2-8) LCHP scores was 1.84 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-3.23; p-trend?=?0.38). Other analyses were largely consistent with the main results, although LCHP score was associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely in women with high saturated fat intakes, and positively in men with higher LCHP scores based on vegetable protein.
These largely null results provide important information concerning the long-term safety of moderate carbohydrate reduction and consequent increases in protein and, in this cohort, especially fat intakes. In order to determine the effects of stricter carbohydrate restriction, further studies encompassing a wider range of macronutrient intakes are warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23651548 View in PubMed
Less detail

Serum follicle-stimulating hormone and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18005
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Dec;12(12):1531-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Alan A Arslan
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Eva Lundin
Andrea Micheli
Annekatrin Lukanova
Yelena Afanasyeva
Per Lenner
Vittorio Krogh
Paola Muti
Sabina Rinaldi
Rudolf Kaaks
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Paolo Toniolo
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. akhmea01@med.nyu.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Dec;12(12):1531-5
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - analysis - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Postmenopause
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Rate
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
The "gonadotropin hypothesis" postulates that gonadotropin overstimulation of ovarian epithelium results in its increased proliferation and subsequent malignant transformation. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the association between prediagnostic serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women who were part of a case-control study nested within three prospective cohorts in New York City, Umeå, Sweden, and Milan, Italy. Case subjects were 88 women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed between 3 months and 13.1 years after the blood donation. Controls were 168 women who were free of cancer and matched the case on cohort, age, and enrollment date. Serum FSH was determined using a quantitative immunoradiometric assay. FSH concentrations were similar in women who subsequently received a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (median, 44.0 mIU/ml; range, 13.8-101.2) and in controls (median, 43.4 mIU/ml; range, 13.5-109.5; P = 0.17). Compared with women in the lowest third, women in the highest third of serum FSH were not at increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer after an adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-1.99). These observations provide no evidence for an association between circulating FSH and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women and do not appear to support the gonadotropin hypothesis of epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
14693749 View in PubMed
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Circulating soluble Fas levels and risk of ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18009
Source
BMC Cancer. 2003 Dec 22;3:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2003
Author
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Eva Lundin
Seth Guller
Annekatrin Lukanova
Andrea Micheli
Yuehong Ma
Yelena Afanasyeva
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Vittorio Krogh
Per Lenner
Paola Muti
Sabina Rinaldi
Rudolf Kaaks
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Paolo Toniolo
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. akhmea01@med.nyu.edu
Source
BMC Cancer. 2003 Dec 22;3:33
Date
Dec-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, CD95 - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of apoptosis, specifically overexpression of soluble Fas (sFas), has been proposed to play a role in the development of ovarian cancer. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate serum sFas as a potential biomarker of ovarian cancer risk. METHODS: The association between serum sFas levels and the risk of ovarian cancer was examined in a case-control study nested within three prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Umeå (Sweden), and Milan (Italy). Case subjects were 138 women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed between 2 months and 13.2 years after the initial blood donation. Control subjects were 263 women who were free of cancer, and matched the case on cohort, menopausal status, age, and enrollment date. Serum sFas levels were determined using a quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Serum sFas levels were similar in women subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer (median, 6.5 ng/mL; range, 4.4-10.2) and in controls (median, 6.8 ng/mL; range, 4.5-10.1). Statistically significant trends of increasing serum sFas with age were observed among cases (r = 0.39, p
PubMed ID
14690548 View in PubMed
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