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Female sex as a risk factor for thromboembolism and death in patients with incident atrial fibrillation. The prospective Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264485
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2014 Oct;112(4):789-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Thure Filskov Overvad
Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen
Flemming Skjøth
Kim Overvad
Ida Ehlers Albertsen
Deirdre A Lane
Gregory Y H Lip
Torben Bjerregaard Larsen
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2014 Oct;112(4):789-95
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Blood Platelets
Denmark
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Thromboembolism - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Several studies have demonstrated sex differences in risk of thromboembolism and death among patients with atrial fibrillation, but it is unclear to what extent these associations relate to actual physiological differences. To date, no study has investigated sex differences with concomitant control for lifestyle related factors known to influence stroke risk. We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, including 57,053 participants (52% female) aged 50-64 years. The study population for this study included the 2,895 patients (36% female) with incident atrial fibrillation after inclusion. Data were linked to outcomes identified using nationwide registries. Risk of thromboembolism and death according to female sex were analysed using Cox proportional hazards models. After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 137 men and 62 women suffered a thromboembolic event, and 349 men and 151 women died. In a crude analysis, female sex was associated with a non-significant lower risk of thromboembolism (hazard ratio [HR] 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-1.11). Adjustment for differences in antithrombotic therapy, relevant comorbidities and lifestyle did not change this association (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.55-1.13). In the final model, female sex was associated with a lower risk of death (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.51-0.84). The associations were similar in a sensitivity analysis of women not taking hormone replacement therapy, and the effect of hormone replacement therapy use within females was non-significant for both endpoints of thromboembolism and death. In conclusion, in a relatively young population of patients with atrial fibrillation, female sex was associated with a lower risk of thromboembolism and death.
PubMed ID
25055988 View in PubMed
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Task-specific balance training improves self-assessed function in community-dwelling older adults with balance deficits and fear of falling: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264491
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2014 Dec;28(12):1189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Kirsti Skavberg Roaldsen
Alexandra Halvarsson
Theres Sahlström
Agneta Ståhle
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2014 Dec;28(12):1189-97
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Exercise Therapy - methods - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Postural Balance - physiology
Prospective Studies
Self-Assessment
Sensation Disorders - psychology - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of a 12-week balance training programme on self-assessed function and disability in healthy community-dwelling older adults with self-perceived balance deficits and fear of falling.
A prospective, randomized controlled trial.
Stockholm County, Sweden.
A total of 59 community-dwelling older adults (42 women and 17 men) aged 67-93 were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 38) or to serve as controls (n = 21) after baseline testing.
The intervention was a 12-week, three times per week, progressive, specific and individually adjusted group balance-training programme.
Self-perceived function and disability measured with Late Life Function and Disability Instrument.
The intervention group reported improvement in overall function (p = 0.016), as well as in basic (p = 0.044) and advanced lower extremity function (p = 0.025) compared with the control group. The study showed no improvement in overall disability or upper extremity function.
This group balance training programme improves self-assessed function in community-dwelling older adults with balance deficits and fear of falling.
Notes
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Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2014;36(10):813-723944179
PubMed ID
24895381 View in PubMed
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Objectively recorded physical activity and the association with gestational diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264492
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):e389-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
K. Mørkrid
A K Jenum
S. Berntsen
L. Sletner
K R Richardsen
S. Vangen
I. Holme
K I Birkeland
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):e389-97
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adult
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this population-based study was to assess the association between objectively recorded physical activity (PA) in early gestation and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identified at 28 weeks of gestation in a multi-ethnic cohort of healthy pregnant women in Oslo, Norway. In total, 759 women were included. In early gestation (
PubMed ID
24894027 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis of pigmented skin tumours in a dermatological setting: different aspects of the number needed to excise as a measure of efficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264505
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Nov;94(6):683-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Ingela Ahnlide
Kari Nielsen
Mats Bjellerup
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Nov;94(6):683-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dermatology - methods
Early Detection of Cancer
Efficiency
Female
Humans
Incidence
Keratosis, Seborrheic - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Male
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Middle Aged
Nevus, Pigmented - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Numbers Needed To Treat
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
The increasing incidence of melanoma prompts a need for efficient management of this patient group. In this study, we use the number needed to excise (NNE), as a measurement of the efficiency of diagnosing melanoma. From January 2009 to December 2012, postoperative records from all patients were prospectively registered. All excised tumours with the histopathological diagnosis of naevus, melanoma or seborrhoeic keratosis were included. NNE values, both excluding and including seborrhoeic keratosis, changes over time, as well as patient- and tumour-related factors influencing NNE were determined. In total, 1,717 cases were included. The overall NNE value was 6.5, and the value fell significantly (r?=?0.959, p?=?0.041) during the 4-year study period from 8.2 to 4.8. NNE values decreased with increasing patient age to 1.8 in patients =?80 years of age. The overall NNE value including seborrhoeic keratosis was 6.8.
PubMed ID
24573000 View in PubMed
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Improvement of in-hospital telemetry monitoring in coronary care units: an intervention study for achieving optimal electrode placement and attachment, hygiene and delivery of critical information to patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264513
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2014 Dec;13(6):515-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Trond R Pettersen
Nina Fålun
Tone M Norekvål
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2014 Dec;13(6):515-23
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - diagnosis - nursing - therapy
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial - methods
Coronary Care Units
Electrocardiography
Electrodes, Implanted
Female
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Hygiene
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Norway
Nurse's Role
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Prospective Studies
Quality Improvement
Severity of Illness Index
Telemetry - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
In-hospital telemetry monitoring is important for diagnosis and treatment of patients at risk of developing life-threatening arrhythmias. It is widely used in critical and non-critical care wards. Nurses are responsible for correct electrode placement, thus ensuring optimal quality of the monitoring. The aims of this study were to determine whether a complex educational intervention improves (a) optimal electrode placement, (b) hygiene, and (c) delivery of critical information to patients (reason for monitoring, limitations in cellular phone use, and not to leave the ward without informing a member of staff).
A prospective interventional study design was used, with data collection occurring over two six-week periods: before implementation of the intervention (n=201) and after the intervention (n=165). Standard abstraction forms were used to obtain data on patients' clinical characteristics, and 10 variables related to electrode placement and attachment, hygiene and delivery of critical information.
At pre-intervention registration, 26% of the electrodes were misplaced. Twelve per cent of the patients received information about limiting their cellular phone use while monitored, 70% were informed of the purpose of monitoring, and 71% used a protective cover for their unit. Post-intervention, outcome measures for the three variables improved significantly: use of protective cover (p
PubMed ID
24304659 View in PubMed
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Serum calcium and risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the Swedish AMORIS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264517
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:663
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Wahyu Wulaningsih
Karl Michaelsson
Hans Garmo
Niklas Hammar
Ingmar Jungner
Göran Walldius
Mats Lambe
Lars Holmberg
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:663
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Calcium - blood
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Observational studies have indicated that high calcium intake may prevent colorectal cancer, but as for randomized trials the results are inconclusive. Meanwhile, limited data on the link between serum calcium and cancer risk is available. We investigated the relation between serum calcium and risk of different gastrointestinal cancers in a prospective study.
A cohort based on 492,044 subjects with baseline information on calcium (mmol/L) and albumin (g/L) was selected from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) study. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyse associations between standardised levels, quartiles and age/sex-specific categories of serum calcium and risk of oesophageal, stomach, colon, rectal cancer and also colorectal cancer combined, while taking into account serum albumin and other comorbidities.
During 12 years of follow-up, we identified 323 incident oesophageal cancers, 782 stomach cancers, 2519 colon cancers, and 1495 rectal cancers. A positive association was found between albumin-adjusted serum calcium and risk of oesophageal [HR: 4.82 (95% CI: 2.07 - 11.19) for high compared to normal age-specific calcium levels] and colon cancer [e.g. HR: 1.07 (95% CI: 1.00 - 1.14) for every SD increase of calcium] as well as colorectal cancer [e.g. HR: 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11) for every SD increase of calcium] in women. In men there were similar but weaker non-statistically significant trends.
The positive relation between serum calcium, oesophageal cancer and colorectal cancer calls for further studies including calcium regulators to evaluate whether there is a true link between calcium metabolism and development of gastrointestinal cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23866097 View in PubMed
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Overuse and traumatic extremity injuries in schoolchildren surveyed with weekly text messages over 2.5 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264518
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):807-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
E. Jespersen
R. Holst
C. Franz
C T Rexen
H. Klakk
N. Wedderkopp
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):807-13
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Lower Extremity - injuries
Male
Musculoskeletal Pain - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Text Messaging
Time Factors
Upper Extremity - injuries
Abstract
The objectives of this prospective cohort study were to report the incidence, prevalence, and duration of traumatic and overuse injuries during a period of 2.5 years and to estimate the odds of injury types. In all, 1259 schoolchildren, aged 6-12, were surveyed each week with an automated mobile phone text message asking questions on the presence of any musculo-skeletal problems and participation in leisure-time sport. Children were examined and injuries classified as overuse or traumatic. The overall injury incidence and prevalence were 1.2% and 4.6% per week, with 2.5 times more overuse than traumatic injuries in lower extremities, and mean injury duration of 5.3 and 4.8 weeks, respectively. A reverse pattern was found for upper extremities, with 3.1 times more traumatic than overuse injuries and mean durations of 3.3 and 5.2 weeks, respectively. Grade level, school type, leisure-time sport, and seasonal variation were associated with the risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries. Only grade level was associated with upper extremity injuries. The magnitude of overuse and traumatic limb injuries emphasizes the need for health professionals, coaches, and parents to pay special attention in relation to the growing and physically active child.
PubMed ID
23800031 View in PubMed
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[Cognitive impairment in postmenopausal women with arterial hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264557
Source
Kardiologiia. 2015;55(1):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
V N Larina
B Ia Bart
Zh R Gardanova
N K Runikhina
Source
Kardiologiia. 2015;55(1):33-6
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition - physiology
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - psychology
Incidence
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess relationship between organ damage and changes of cognitive function in postmenopausal women with arterial hypertension during 3 years of follow-up. A total of 55 women (aged 69 ± 9,5 years) with stable course of hypertension were included. During period of observation and treatment cognitive function deteriorated in 40 and improved in 60% of women. Cox regression analysis showed that worsening of cognitive function was associated with low level of education (OR 3.85, p = 0.021), lack of work (OR 5.71, p = 0.035), left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic diameter (OR 6.89, p = 0.019), LV end-systolic diameter (OR 3.21, p = 0.047), left atrium (OR 15.20, p = 0.020), microalbuminuria (OR 11.14, p = 0.041) and duration of chair-rising test (OR 7.0, p = 0.025). Our findings indicate that progressive organ damage, low level of education and lack of work are associated with deterioration of cognitive function and functional mobility in women with hypertension. Our results reinforce the need for early detection of cognitive impairment as a marker of subclinical brain damage to prevent dementia.
PubMed ID
26050487 View in PubMed
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Association between Weight Change and Mortality in Community Living Older People Followed for Up to 14 Years. The Hordaland Health Study (HUSK).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289903
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017; 21(8):909-917
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
T R Haugsgjerd
J Dierkes
S E Vollset
K J Vinknes
O K Nygård
R Seifert
G Sulo
G S Tell
Author Affiliation
Teresa Risan Haugsgjerd, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway; Email: Teresa.Haugsgjerd@uib.no, Tel: +47 40634711.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017; 21(8):909-917
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Community Medicine
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
To study the importance of weight change with regard to mortality in older people.
Prospective cohort study.
The cohort includes participants in the Hordaland Health Study, Norway, 1997-99 (N=2935, age 71-74 years) who had previously participated in a survey in 1992-93.
Participants with weight measured at both surveys were followed for mortality through 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate risk of death according to changes in weight. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for people with stable weight (± 3 kg were significantly associated with increased risk of mortality. Thus, weight should be routinely measured in older adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28972244 View in PubMed
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Night work, long work weeks, and risk of accidental injuries. A register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289904
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2017 11 01; 43(6):578-586
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-01-2017
Author
Ann D Larsen
Harald Hannerz
Simone V Møller
Johnny Dyreborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Johnni Hansen
Henrik A Kolstad
Åse Marie Hansen
Anne Helene Garde
Author Affiliation
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersoe Parkalle 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen. adl@nrcwe.dk.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2017 11 01; 43(6):578-586
Date
11-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Shift Work Schedule - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
Objectives The aims of this study were to (i) investigate the association between night work or long work weeks and the risk of accidental injuries and (ii) test if the association is affected by age, sex or socioeconomic status. Methods The study population was drawn from the Danish version of the European Labour Force Survey from 1999-2013. The current study was based on 150 438 participants (53% men and 47% women). Data on accidental injuries were obtained at individual level from national health registers. We included all 20-59-year-old employees working =32 hours a week at the time of the interview. We used Poisson regression to estimate the relative rates (RR) of accidental injuries as a function of night work or long work weeks (>40 hours per week) adjusted for year of interview, sex, age, socioeconomic status (SES), industry, and weekly working hours or night work. Age, sex and SES were included as two-way interactions. Results We observed 23 495 cases of accidental injuries based on 273 700 person years at risk. Exposure to night work was statistically significantly associated with accidental injuries (RR 1.11, 99% CI 1.06-1.17) compared to participants with no recent night work. No associations were found between long work weeks (>40 hours) and accidental injuries. Conclusion We found a modest increased risk of accidental injuries when reporting night work. No associations between long work weeks and risk of accidental injuries were observed. Age, sex and SES showed no trends when included as two-way interactions.
PubMed ID
28914325 View in PubMed
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