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1678 records – page 1 of 168.

Why are clinical problems difficult? General practitioners' opinions concerning 24 clinical problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227814
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Dec 15;143(12):1305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1990
Author
H. Leclère
M D Beaulieu
G. Bordage
A. Sindon
M. Couillard
Author Affiliation
Bureau de pédagogie des sciences de la santé, Faculté de médecine, Université Laval, Ste-Foy, PQ.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Dec 15;143(12):1305-15
Date
Dec-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Family Practice - education
Female
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Pilot Projects
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Abstract
This study was conducted to describe the difficulties perceived by general practitioners concerning 24 common clinical problems and to compare their perceptions with those of faculty members in family medicine. A random sample of 467 general practitioners and all 182 faculty members in family medicine in Quebec were sent one of four open-ended questionnaires, each of which dealt with six clinical problems; 214 general practitioners and 114 faculty members participated. A total of 5111 difficulties were reported; the number reported by each subject varied from 0 to 13 (mean 2.6 [standard deviation 2.09]) per problem. The problems that generated the most difficulties were depression, confusion in the elderly, chronic back pain, loss of autonomy in the elderly and sexually transmitted disease. The most frequent difficulties were with the patient's noncompliance with treatment, clinical diagnosis, failure of a specific treatment, inadequate health care resources and the physician's own emotional reactions. The difficulties for each problem were the same in the two groups 70% of the time. Physician's perceptions of their difficulties can be useful in the planning of initial training and continuing medical education.
Notes
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74843571
Cites: N Z Med J. 1983 May 25;96(732):395-76573610
Cites: Med Care. 1983 Jan;21(1):105-226403780
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1982 Mar 4;306(9):511-57057858
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Mar 1;124(5):563-67471001
PubMed ID
2253138 View in PubMed
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The doctor as double agent: information asymmetry, health insurance, and medical care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227834
Source
J Health Econ. 1991;10(4):411-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A. Blomqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
J Health Econ. 1991;10(4):411-32
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Efficiency
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Maintenance Organizations - economics
Humans
Information Theory
Insurance, Physician Services - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, Econometric
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Stochastic Processes
Abstract
In a model incorporating uncertainty and state-dependent utility of health services, as well as information asymmetry between patients/buyers and physicians/sellers, two types of equilibria are compared: (1) when consumers have conventional third-party insurance and doctors are paid on the basis of fee-for-service; and (2) when insurance is through an HMO which provides health services through its own doctors. Conditions are found under which contractual or legal incentives can overcome the information asymmetry problem and bring about an efficient allocation of resources to health services provision.
PubMed ID
10117012 View in PubMed
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[The accessibility of patients' personal physicians and quality of care of patients under home nursing care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228016
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3517-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1990
Author
H K Otterstad
P. Bomann-Larsen
M D Gran
Author Affiliation
Fylkeslegen i Vestfold, Tønsberg.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3517-20
Date
Nov-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
A study was carried out in the county of Vestfold in the spring of 1989 to establish the quality and quantity of the medical services for patients nursed at home. The study showed that doctors in rural districts provide better service than doctors in the towns. This difference is particularly noticeable in the case of patients who are acutely ill. The study also showed that patient-doctor contacts are seldom for patients nursed at home, with an average frequency of one every eight weeks for consulting-room consultations and one every 15 weeks for visits to the home.
PubMed ID
2256088 View in PubMed
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[A personal physician, wishes and realities in Northern Norway. A patient study in Northern Norway in 1987].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228020
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3482-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1990
Author
H. Melbye
I. Aaraas
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3482-4
Date
Nov-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Satisfaction
Continuity of Patient Care
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Questionnaires
Abstract
Among patients consulting general practitioners in northern Norway, 57% had a stable relationship with one doctor, according to answers to a questionnaire. Rather than having a free choice between several doctors, 85% preferred to have a personal doctor. About half the patients wanted the same doctor for the whole family. Even if they had to wait longer for the consultation, 63% would prefer to meet their own doctor. A personal doctor was much less common in northern Norway than in the rest of the country, which could be put down to lower stability in the practices.
PubMed ID
2256075 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3475-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1990
Author
M. Nylenna
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3475-6
Date
Nov-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction
Humans
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Health Care
PubMed ID
2256071 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1987 Nov;5(4):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987
Author
P. Kekki
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1987 Nov;5(4):195-200
Date
Nov-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Child, Preschool
Comprehensive Health Care - trends
Continuity of Patient Care - trends
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Family Practice - trends
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Otitis Media - therapy
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care - trends
Quality of Health Care - trends
Referral and Consultation - trends
Research
Abstract
In this article the author discusses some of the principles of evaluation of quality of care in general practice and connects this with some empiric results of a study which attempted to evaluate the quality of work of the general practitioners in a Finnish health centre. Data were obtained by 1) recording all the 8701 persons visiting during one year; 2) drawing a systematic sample of 2540 persons from all those who visited; and 3) abstracting the required information from patient documents to specially planned precoded and pretested forms. The objectives of the study included the investigation of the quality aspects of the health centre doctor services, among other things also the continuity and coordination of care. The results raise questions concerning the quality of work. No general conclusions on the quality of care are drawn, since the data may not be adequate for that. According to the author, the findings emphasise the importance of at least three things: The consideration of what is done in the context of the patients' prognosis, the communication skills of the general practitioners and the communication between the general practitioners who work in the same place. In the light of the described and other findings of the study it is strongly recommended that the study of the contents of the work should be an integral part of today's general practice.
PubMed ID
3423487 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1987 Oct;32(7):505-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
G. Weiss
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Montreal Children's Hospital.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1987 Oct;32(7):505-7
Date
Oct-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - therapy
Child Psychiatry - trends
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Referral and Consultation - trends
PubMed ID
3676978 View in PubMed
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Fighting back: the search for a solution to prescription drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235352
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Apr 1;136(7):745-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1987

Impact of health information-seeking behavior and personal factors on preferred role in treatment decision making in men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129805
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2012 Nov-Dec;35(6):411-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
B Joyce Davison
Erin Nicole Breckon
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. joyce.davison@usask.ca
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2012 Nov-Dec;35(6):411-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - methods
Patient Preference - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Psychology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Self Concept
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Prostate cancer (PC) patients continue to have unmet information needs at the time of diagnosis and are often unable to communicate their preferences to physicians at the time of the treatment consultation.
The objective of the study was to determine the impact of health information-seeking behavior (HISB) and personal factors on patients' preferred role in treatment decision making (TDM).
Participants consisted of 150 men with newly diagnosed PC seen at 2 urology clinics in western Canada. A survey questionnaire was used to gather information on HISB, personal factors influencing treatment choice, and decision control.
More than 90% of the participants reported a preference to play either an active or collaborative role in TDM and having either an "intense" or "complementary" HISB. No significant association was found between HISB and preferred role in TDM. Impact of treatment on survival and urinary function and the urologist's recommendation were identified as the 3 main factors influencing the treatment decision.
At the time of diagnosis, the majority of men want to be involved in TDM and have access to information. Our findings suggest that the type and amount of information men want to access are dependent on HISB. Assessing factors having an impact on TDM may prove useful to guide patient-clinician treatment discussions.
This survey provides clinicians with a method to assess information and decision preferences of men with newly diagnosed PC and factors having an influence on treatment choice.
PubMed ID
22067700 View in PubMed
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1678 records – page 1 of 168.