Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2935 records – page 1 of 294.

The effects of Nordic school meals on concentration and school performance in 8- to 11-year-old children in the OPUS School Meal Study: a cluster-randomised, controlled, cross-over trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264223
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Apr 28;113(8):1280-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-2015
Author
Louise B Sørensen
Camilla B Dyssegaard
Camilla T Damsgaard
Rikke A Petersen
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Mads F Hjorth
Rikke Andersen
Inge Tetens
Christian Ritz
Arne Astrup
Lotte Lauritzen
Kim F Michaelsen
Niels Egelund
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Apr 28;113(8):1280-91
Date
Apr-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Anthropometry
Attention
Child
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet
Female
Food Services
Humans
Learning
Male
Mathematics
Meals
Models, Statistical
Nutritional Sciences
Reading
Reproducibility of Results
Schools
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
It is widely assumed that nutrition can improve school performance in children; however, evidence remains limited and inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated whether serving healthy school meals influenced concentration and school performance of 8- to 11-year-old Danish children. The OPUS (Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet) School Meal Study was a cluster-randomised, controlled, cross-over trial comparing a healthy school meal programme with the usual packed lunch from home (control) each for 3 months (NCT 01457794). The d2 test of attention, the Learning Rating Scale (LRS) and standard tests on reading and mathematics proficiency were administered at baseline and at the end of each study period. Intervention effects were evaluated using hierarchical mixed models. The school meal intervention did not influence concentration performance (CP; primary outcome, n 693) or processing speed; however, the decrease in error percentage was 0·18 points smaller (P
PubMed ID
25791747 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of dietary alpha-linolenic acid with blood pressure and subclinical atherosclerosis in people born small for gestational age: the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264230
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1252-1257.e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Michael R Skilton
Katja Pahkala
Jorma S A Viikari
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli Simell
Antti Jula
Harri Niinikoski
David S Celermajer
Olli T Raitakari
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1252-1257.e2
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aorta - pathology
Atherosclerosis - blood
Birth weight
Blood pressure
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intervention Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage
Abstract
To determine whether dietary alpha-linolenic (omega-3) fatty acid intake is associated with lower blood pressure and aortic intima-media thickness (IMT) in people born small for gestational age (SGA).
Participants were recruited at age 6 months and followed up every 6-12 months until age 19 years. Blood pressure and food records were assessed at each visit. A total of 1009 participants had at least one blood pressure measure and complete birth weight and gestational age data, including 115 (11%) born SGA (birth weight=10th percentile). Aortic IMT was assessed by ultrasound at 19 years (n=413). Analysis was by linear mixed models and multivariable linear regression.
Children born SGA had greater systolic and pulse pressure from age 14 years onwards. In those born SGA, systolic blood pressure was 2.1 mm Hg lower ([95% CI 0.8-3.3]; P=.001) and pulse pressure 1.4 mm Hg lower ([95% CI 0.3-2.4]; P=.01), per exponential increase in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) intake; weakened by adjustment for anthropometric measures. Long-term ALA intake was inversely associated with aortic IMT at 19 years in those born SGA (-0.30 mm [95% CI -0.52, -0.08] per exponential greater ALA intake; P=.008), independent of other dietary and anthropometric factors.
Long-term dietary ALA intake during childhood is associated with improved vascular health in people born SGA.
PubMed ID
25702059 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet shift induced rapid evolution of size and function in a predatory bird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264271
Source
Oecologia. 2014 Nov;176(3):781-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Risto Tornberg
Laura Liuska
Seppo Rytkönen
Marko Mutanen
Panu Välimäki
Source
Oecologia. 2014 Nov;176(3):781-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Evolution
Body Size
Diet
Female
Finland
Hawks - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Male
Phenotype
Predatory Behavior
Abstract
A predator's body size correlates with its prey size. Change in the diet may call for changes in the hunting mode and traits determining hunting success. We explored long-term trends in sternum size and shape in the northern goshawk by applying geometric morphometrics. Tetraonids, the primary prey of the goshawk, have decreased and been replaced by smaller birds in the diet. We expected that the size of the goshawk has decreased accordingly more in males than females based on earlier observations of outer morphology. We also expected changes in sternum shape as a function of changes in hunting mode. Size of both sexes has decreased during the preceding decades (1962-2008), seemingly reflecting a shift in prey size and hunting mode. Female goshawks hunting also mammalian prey tend to have a pronouncedly "Buteo-type" sternum compared to males preying upon birds. Interestingly, the shrinkage of body size resulted in an increasingly "Buteo-type" sternum in both sexes. In addition, the sternum shape in birds that died accidentally (i.e., fit individuals) was more Buteo-type than in starved ones, hinting that selection was towards a Buteo-type sternum shape. We conclude that these observed patterns are likely due to directional selection driven by changes in the diet towards smaller and more agile prey. On the other hand, global warming is predicted to also cause a decrease in size, thus these two scenarios are inseparable. Because of difficulties in studying fitness-related phenotypic changes of large raptors in the field, time series of museum exemplars collected over a wide geographical area may give answers to this conundrum.
PubMed ID
25217047 View in PubMed
Less detail

A U-shaped association between consumption of marine n-3 fatty acids and development of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter-a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264324
Source
Europace. 2014 Nov;16(11):1554-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Thomas A Rix
Albert M Joensen
Sam Riahi
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Erik B Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Source
Europace. 2014 Nov;16(11):1554-61
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Atrial Flutter - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Docosahexaenoic Acids - administration & dosage
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nonlinear Dynamics
Proportional Hazards Models
Protective factors
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Seafood
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a lower risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) with higher intakes of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), but the results have been inconsistent. The aim was to investigate the association between consumption of marine n-3 PUFA and development of AF.
A total of 57 053 Danish participants 50-64 years of age were enrolled in the Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort Study between 1993 and 1997. Dietary intake of fish and marine n-3 PUFA was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. In total, 3345 incident cases of AF occurred over 13.6 years. Multivariate Cox regression analyses (3284 cases and 55 246 participants) using cubic splines showed a U-shaped association between consumption of marine n-3 PUFA and risk of incident AF, with the lowest risk of AF at a moderate intake of 0.63 g/day. For quintiles of marine n-3 PUFA intake, a 13% statistically significant lower risk of AF was seen in the middle vs. lowest quintile: Q1 reference, Q2 HR 0.92 (95% CI 0.82-1.03), Q3 HR 0.87 (95% CI 0.78-0.98), Q4 HR 0.96 (95% CI 0.86-1.08), and Q5 HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.93-1.18). Intake of total fish, fatty fish, and the individual n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and docosapentaenoic acid also showed U-shaped associations with incident AF.
We found a U-shaped association between consumption of marine n-3 PUFA and risk of incident AF, with the lowest risk close to the median intake of total marine n-3 PUFA (0.63 g/day).
PubMed ID
24574493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of changes in a food frequency questionnaire: comparing data from two national dietary survey instruments among 12-month-old infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264339
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:680
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Inger Therese Laugsand Lillegaard
Lene Frost Andersen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:680
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Cross-Over Studies
Databases, Factual
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Female
Food
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Male
Mental Recall
Norway
Parents
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
National dietary surveys among Norwegian 12-months olds have been conducted twice: in 1999 and 2007. At both time-points diet were assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ) (the SFFQ-1999 and the SFFQ-2007). Modifications in the SFFQ-2007 compared to the SFFQ-1999 have been made; therefore, the objective of the present study has been to explore the comparability of the data obtained by the two questionnaires. Moreover, reliability of maternal recall of infant feeding practices was assessed.
Three hundred Norwegian infants born in April 2007 were invited to participate by completing both the SFFQ-1999 and the SFFQ-2007. An invitation letter and one of two questionnaires were sent by mail to the mother/parents about two weeks before the child turned 12 months of age. The study had a cross-over design where half of the sample received the SFFQ-1999 first and then about 2-3 weeks later they received the SFFQ-2007. The second half received the SFFQ-2007 first, and then 2-3 weeks later they received the SFFQ-1999.
Ninety three participants completed both questionnaires (SFFQ-1999 and SFFQ-2007). For nutrients, the largest significant differences between the questionnaires were found for intake of vitamin D and added sugar, where added sugar was reported lower and vitamin D was reported higher with the SFFQ-2007 compared to the SFFQ-1999. For food items, lower intake of yoghurt and higher intake of vegetables and fish were observed with the SFFQ-2007 compared to the SFFQ-1999. In addition, reliable answers with regard to breastfeeding status, age for breastfeeding cessation and age for introducing solid foods were found.
There was reasonable comparability between the two questionnaires for most nutrients and foods. The differences between the two questionnaires could mainly be explained by modifications that had occurred over time, where changes in the food composition databases used and especially changes in commercial recipes with regard to baby food products seemed to be of major importance. The differences are important to take into account when interpreting dietary trends among Norwegian 12 month-olds in the period from 1999 to 2007. This study also implies that maternal recall of infant feeding practices is reliable.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2001;21:475-9811375446
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Aug;57(8):881-812879081
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;57(11):1498-50314576765
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Jun;7(4):495-50315153255
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Feb 8;1(8476):307-102868172
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2005 Apr;63(4):103-1015869124
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Jan;6(1):382-9919440290
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Oct;110(10):1501-1020869489
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 28;109(2):363-922716945
PubMed ID
23883290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluoroalkyl substances in a remote population of Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289912
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):387-395
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Samuel Byrne
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Pamela Miller
Vi Waghiyi
Frank A von Hippel
C Loren Buck
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Studies, 104 Memorial Hall, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY 13617, USA. Electronic address: sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):387-395
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Animals
Diet
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Fluorocarbons - blood
Food
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - blood
Humans
Islands
Smegmamorpha - metabolism
Abstract
Many Alaska Native communities rely on a traditional marine diet that contains persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The indoor environment is also a source of POPs. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are present both in the traditional diet and the home indoor environment.
We assessed exposure to PBDEs and PFASs among residents of two remote Alaska Native villages on St. Lawrence Island. Ninespine stickleback (Pungitious pungitious) and Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) were used to detect accumulation of these compounds in the local environment.
Concentrations of PBDEs and PFASs were measured in dust collected from 49 households on St. Lawrence Island, as well as in blood serum from 85 island residents. Resident ninespine stickleback and Alaska blackfish were used as sentinels to detect accumulation of PBDEs and PFASs in the food web.
Serum concentrations of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were elevated, despite low concentrations of PFASs in dust samples. Concentrations of PBDEs in dust and serum were similar to those from the contiguous United States. Statistical associations between dust and serum concentrations are apparent for a small number of PBDEs, suggesting a possible route of exposure. Predominant compounds were similar between human sera and stickleback; however, blackfish accumulated PFASs not found in either stickleback or human sera.
Household dust contributes to PBDE exposure, but not PFAS exposure. Elevated concentrations of long chain PFASs in serum are likely due to exposure from traditional foods. The presence of both PFASs and PBDEs in sentinel fish species suggests atmospheric deposition and bioaccumulation, as well as local environmental contamination.
PubMed ID
28818814 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic Neurodegenerative Illnesses and Epilepsy in Danish Adventists and Baptists: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289954
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 56(4):1429-1435
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Lau Caspar Thygesen
Louise NØrreslet Gimsing
Andrea Bautz
Niels Christian Hvidt
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 56(4):1429-1435
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson disease - epidemiology
Protestantism
Abstract
Limited knowledge of the influence of lifestyle risk factors and religious living on chronic neurological diseases exists. Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) do not consume tobacco, alcohol, or pork, and many adhere to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, and Baptists discourage excessive use of alcohol and tobacco.
We investigated whether the incidence of four common chronic neurological illnesses: dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy in a large cohort of Danish Adventists and Baptists was different compared to the general Danish population. Three of the illnesses are neurodegenerative, whereas epilepsy can occur at any age.
We compared hospital admission rates for some major neurological diseases among members of the Danish Religious Societies Health Study comprising 6,532 SDA and 3,720 Baptists with the general Danish population. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) stratified by sex, age, and calendar time were calculated.
SIR of dementia or Alzheimer's disease was significantly decreased for members of both communities (SDA, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-#x2013;0.90 and Baptists, 0.59; 0.47-#x2013;0.73). The SIRs of Parkinson's disease and epilepsy were not significantly different compared to the general population.
We observe reduced incidence for dementia or Alzheimer's disease in a large cohort of members of two religious communities characterized by lifestyle recommendations. More studies are needed to disentangle the interaction between such lifestyle and other components of the religious belief system.
PubMed ID
28128767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Introduction of complementary foods in Sweden and impact of maternal education on feeding practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290103
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Apr; 20(6):1054-1062
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Sofia Klingberg
Johnny Ludvigsson
Hilde K Brekke
Author Affiliation
1Division of Pediatrics,Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine,Linköping University,Linköping,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Apr; 20(6):1054-1062
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health education
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Life Style
Mothers - education
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Weaning
Abstract
To describe the introduction of complementary foods in a population-based cohort in relation to recommendations and explore the possible impact of maternal education on infant feeding practices.
Prospective data from the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort study were used. The ABIS study invited all infants born in south-east Sweden during October 1997-October 1999 (n 21 700) to participate. A questionnaire was completed for 16 022 infants. During the infants' first year parents continuously filed in a diary covering introduction of foods.
Sweden.
Infants (n 9727) with completed food diaries.
Potatoes, vegetables, fruits/berries and porridge were the foods first introduced, with a median introduction between 19 and 22 weeks, followed by introduction of meat, cow's milk, follow-on formula and sour milk/yoghurt between 24 and 27 weeks. Early introduction of any food, before 16 weeks, occurred for 27 % of the infants and was more common in infants of mothers with low education. Overall, potatoes (14·7 %), vegetables (11·1 %), fruits/berries (8·5 %), porridge (7·4 %) and follow-on formula (2·7 %) were the foods most frequently introduced early. The majority of infants (=70 %) were introduced to potatoes, vegetables, fruits/berries and porridge during concurrent breast-feeding, but introduction during concurrent breast-feeding was less common in infants of mothers with low education.
Most infants were introduced to complementary foods timely in relation to recommendations. Low maternal education was associated with earlier introduction of complementary foods and less introduction during concurrent breast-feeding. Still, the results indicated exposure to fewer foods at 12 months in infants of mothers with low education.
PubMed ID
27917749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density is Influenced by Vitamin D Supplementation and Vitamin K1 Intake in Adults with Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290114
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 Mar; 78(1):11-19
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Michelle R Hoffmann
Peter A Senior
Stephanie T Jackson
Guylaine Ferland
Nancy Presse
Kailash Jindal
Ping Li
Abeer S Alzaben
Diana R Mager
Author Affiliation
a Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 Mar; 78(1):11-19
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Bone Density - drug effects
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage - blood
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - drug therapy
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage - blood
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - drug therapy
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - blood
Vitamin K 1 - administration & dosage - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with diabetes (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for suboptimal bone health. The study objective was to investigate the relationships between vitamin D (vitD), vitamin K1 (vitK1), and calcium intake with bone mineral density (BMD) and vitamin D status in an ambulatory population with DM and CKD.
Adults (age 18-80 years; n?=?62) with DM and CKD (stages 1-4) were recruited from the Northern Alberta Renal Program. Primary outcome variables included vitD, vitK1, and calcium intake; serum 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D; and BMD as measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Statistical significance was determined at P?1000 IU/D). BMD was positively influenced by serum 25(OH)D. However, serum 25(OH) =100 nmol/L was associated with lower BMD (absolute and T-scores) for whole-body and spine (P?=?0.05). VitK1 intake (=200 µg/day) was associated with higher whole-body and femoral-neck BMDs (absoluteand T-scores; P?=?0.05).
VitD status and BMD in adults with DM and CKD was influenced by vitD supplementation and vitK1 intake.
PubMed ID
27779902 View in PubMed
Less detail

2935 records – page 1 of 294.