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Dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and risk of myocardial infarction - a population-based prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269299
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 15;183:242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2015
Author
Charlotte Bergkvist
Marika Berglund
Anders Glynn
Alicja Wolk
Agneta Åkesson
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 15;183:242-8
Date
Mar-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cohort Studies
Diet
Docosahexaenoic Acids - administration & dosage
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - poisoning
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Fish consumption may promote cardiovascular health. The role of major food contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) common in fatty fish, is unclear. We assessed the association between dietary PCB exposure and risk of myocardial infarction taking into account the intake of long-chain omega-3 fish fatty acids.
In the prospective population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort, 33,446 middle-aged and elderly women, free from cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes at baseline (1997) were followed-up for 12 years. Validated estimates of dietary PCB exposure and intake of fish fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid; EPA-DHA) were obtained via a food frequency questionnaire at baseline.
During follow-up 1386 incident cases of myocardial infarction were ascertained through register-linkage. Women in the highest quartile of dietary PCB exposure (median 286 ng/day) had a multivariable-adjusted RR of myocardial infarction of 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.45) compared to the lowest quartile (median 101 ng/day) before, and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.10-2.25) after adjusting for EPA-DHA. Stratification by low and high EPA-DHA intake, resulted in RRs 2.20 (95% CI, 1.18-4.12) and 1.73 (95% CI, 0.81-3.69), respectively comparing highest PCB tertile with lowest. The intake of dietary EPA-DHA was inversely associated with risk of myocardial infarction after but not before adjusting for dietary PCB.
Exposure to PCBs was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, while some beneficial effect was associated with increasing EPA and DHA intake. To increase the net benefits of fish consumption, PCB contamination should be reduced to a minimum.
PubMed ID
25679993 View in PubMed
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Interaction between genetic predisposition to adiposity and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269335
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e110890
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mikkel Z Ankarfeldt
Sofus C Larsen
Lars Ängquist
Lise Lotte N Husemoen
Nina Roswall
Kim Overvad
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Jytte Halkjær
Anne Tjønneland
Allan Linneberg
Ulla Toft
Torben Hansen
Oluf Pedersen
Berit L Heitmann
Arne Astrup
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e110890
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Alleles
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Proteins
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry.
To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI) and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight (?BW) or change in WC (?WC).
Three different Danish cohorts were used. In total 7,054 individuals constituted the study population with information on diet, 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI, WC or WHRBMI, as well as potential confounders. Mean follow-up time was ~5 years. Four genetic predisposition-scores were based on the SNPs; a complete-score including all selected adiposity- associated SNPs, and three scores including BMI, WC or WHRBMI associated polymorphisms, respectively. The association between protein intake and ?BW or ?WC were examined and interactions between SNP-score and protein were investigated. Analyses were based on linear regressions using macronutrient substitution models and meta-analyses.
When protein replaced carbohydrate, meta-analyses showed no associations with ?BW (41.0 gram/y/5 energy% protein, [95% CI: -32.3; 114.3]) or ?WC (
Notes
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PubMed ID
25350854 View in PubMed
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The effects of a counselling intervention on lifestyle change in people at risk of cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269352
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Eeva-Leena Ylimäki
Outi Kanste
Hanna Heikkinen
Risto Bloigu
Helvi Kyngäs
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):153-61
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Directive Counseling
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
The study assessed the effects of a counselling intervention on lifestyle changes in certain-aged people at risk of cardiovascular disease.
This was an intervention study at baseline and six- and 12-month follow-ups. The participants were 40 years old (n= 53 at baseline, n=33 at six months and n=34 at 12 months). The main outcomes were cardiovascular health parameters, such as weight, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol (total, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein), blood glucose, and self-assessed and reported lifestyle and adherence to lifestyle changes. The counselling intervention was Internet-based and carried out via Skype or face-to-face in small groups (on average, six participants).
There were statistically significant differences between the baseline and the 12-month follow-up with respect to the consumption of fat and snacks. Some positive cardiovascular health improvements were detected between baseline and six months, but not as clearly between baseline and 12 months. The participants reported having a healthier diet at 12 months than at baseline. At 12 months, BMI measurements indicated that all participants were overweight (mean BMI 29.8), but according to the self-assessed data, only 25% considered themselves to be so.
Changes in lifestyle were detected as a result of the intervention. These lifestyle changes may improve cardiovascular health in the long term. Discrepancies were found between the measured indicators of cardiovascular health and information obtained from questionnaires and diary records. In order to achieve sustainable lifestyle changes, long-term support is required.
PubMed ID
24463729 View in PubMed
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Changes in lifestyle modestly reduce the estimated cardiovascular disease risk in one-year follow-up of the Finnish diabetes prevention program (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269353
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Nina Rautio
Jari Jokelainen
Auli Pölönen
Heikki Oksa
Markku Peltonen
Mauno Vanhala
Hannu Puolijoki
Leena Moilanen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Timo Saaristo
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):145-52
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control - psychology
Diet
Directive Counseling
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess whether changes in self-rated physical activity and diet during a type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention program were associated with changes in estimated 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality in people at high risk for T2D.
Individuals were identified and offered lifestyle counseling as part of the Finnish diabetes prevention program. Ten-year risk for estimated CVD events and mortality were calculated with Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) formula. FRS was available for 774 men and 1474 women and SCORE for 961 men and 1766 women.
During the one-year follow-up, 9.6% of the men reported both an increase in physical activity and improved dietary pattern, 4.1% an increase in physical activity, 39.3% an increase in improved dietary pattern, while 47.0% reported no lifestyle changes. Corresponding numbers for women were 14.2%, 3.8%, 39.2% and 42.7%. Estimated 10-year risk for CVD events decreased 3.5% in men and 1.5% in women reporting an increase in physical activity and improvement in diet, compared to an increase of 0.15% in men (p
PubMed ID
24452452 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of perfluorinated alkylated substances in cereals, salt, sweets and fruit items collected in four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269463
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Wendy D'Hollander
Dorte Herzke
Sandra Huber
Jana Hajslova
Jana Pulkrabova
Gianfranco Brambilla
Stefania Paola De Filippis
Lieven Bervoets
Pim de Voogt
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:179-85
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Belgium
Czech Republic
Diet
Edible Grain - chemistry
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Italy
Norway
Sodium Chloride - chemistry
Abstract
In the context of a European project, 12 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) were determined in 14 food items collected in four European countries representing northern, southern, eastern and western Europe. This study presents the results of PFAAs measured in fruit, cereals, sweets and salt. Out of the 12 PFAAs, 10 PFAAs were detected in 67% of the samples. Overall, PFOA was the most abundant compound and the highest concentrations were found for PFOS but all were less than 1ngg(-1). When comparing the four countries, highest levels and detection frequencies were observed in Belgium (Western Europe), followed by the Czech Republic (Eastern Europe), Italy (Southern Europe) and finally Norway (Northern Europe). Comparison of profiles and levels is difficult due to variations in constitution of the food categories in the investigated countries and countries of origin of the food items. Dietary intake assessments for PFOS and PFOA show that the daily intake of PFAAs is far below the existing tolerable levels. However, they contribute to the total dietary intake and should therefore be included in future dietary exposure assessments.
PubMed ID
25455675 View in PubMed
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Health, health-compromising behavior, risk-taking behavior and sexuality in female and male high school students in vocational compared with theoretical programs in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86914
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;19(4):459-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
Holmberg Lars I
Hellberg Dan
Author Affiliation
Child Health Unit, Falun Hospital, Sweden. lars.i.holmberg@ltdalarna.se
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;19(4):459-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Aggression
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Risk-Taking
Schools - classification
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to determine whether adolescents attending vocational high school programs in Sweden show unhealthy or risky behaviors to a higher extent than those attending theoretical programs, and whether there were gender differences. METHODS: All eligible adolescents 16-18 years old, after exclusion of first- and second-generation immigrants, attending high school (1,332 pupils) in a medium-sized town in Sweden completed a validated in-depth questionnaire (Q90) with 165 questions in the classroom. In comparisons, adjustments were made for socio-demographic variables. RESULTS: A significant difference was found for the variable having at least one parent with university education (odds ratio (OR 0.28) for those attending vocational programs). In girls: have bullied (OR 2.01), eat breakfast all school days (OR 0.31), have shoplifted (OR 3.46), smoking (OR 5.69), and have had more than five sexual partners (OR 4.74) all differed significantly. Some variables with significant differences in boys were; eat fruit or vegetables every day (OR 0.55), feeling depressed (OR 0.62), sports activity at least once a week (OR 0.56), vandalizing (OR 2.11), regular alcohol use (OR 1.44), and contraceptive use at latest sexual intercourse (OR 0.47). CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that preventive interventional strategies, aimed at improving health maintenance among adolescents should take into consideration the differences between students in vocational and theoretical programs, including the cluster and accumulation of health-risk behaviors.
PubMed ID
18348421 View in PubMed
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Influence of timed nutrient diet on depression and light sensitivity in seasonal affective disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86939
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2008 Feb;25(1):51-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Danilenko Konstantin V
Plisov Igor L
Hébert Marc
Kräuchi Kurt
Wirz-Justice Anna
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. dani@irs.ru
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2008 Feb;25(1):51-64
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect - radiation effects
Aged
Depression - diet therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - therapeutic use
Dietary Proteins - therapeutic use
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Middle Aged
Photophobia - diet therapy
Questionnaires
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diet therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Sunlight
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) patients crave and eat more carbohydrates (CHO) in fall-winter when depressed, especially in the evenings, and feel energetic thereafter. Evening CHO-rich meals can phase delay circadian rhythms, and glucose increases retinal response to light. We studied timed CHO- or protein-rich (PROT) diet as a putative therapy for SAD. Unmedicated, DSM-IV-diagnosed depressed women with SAD (n=22, 19-63 yrs) in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (present in 19) were randomized to nine days of eating approximately 1600 kcal of either CHO before 12:00 h (n=9), CHO after 18:00 h (n=6), or PROT after 18:00 h (n=7); only water was allowed for the rest of the day. Measurements included the depression questionnaire SIGH-SAD (with 21-item Hamilton depression subscale), Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ), percentage fat (by bioimpedancemetry), clinical biochemistry (glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, TSH, T4, cortisol), and electroretinogram (ERG). No differential effects of diet were found on any of the studied parameters (except DEBQ). Clinically, participants improved slightly; the 21-HDRS score (mean+/-SD) decreased from 19.6+/-6.4 to 14.4+/-7.4 (p=.004). Percent change correlated significantly with menstrual day at diet onset (mood improved the first week after menstruation onset), change in available sunshine (more sunlight, better mood), and initial percentage fat (fatter patients improved more). Scotopic ERG amplitude was diminished after treatment (p=.025, three groups combined), probably due to greater exposure to sunshine in 14/22 subjects (partial correlation analysis significant). Keeping in mind the limitations of this ambulatory study (i.e., inability to control outdoor light exposure, small number of participants, and briefness of intervention), it is suggested that the 25% clinical improvement (of the order of magnitude of placebo) is not related to nutrient diet or its timing, but rather to natural changes during the menstrual cycle, available sunshine, and ease of dieting for fatter patients.
PubMed ID
18293149 View in PubMed
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Inverse relation between dietary intake of naturally occurring plant sterols and serum cholesterol in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87025
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):993-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Klingberg Sofia
Ellegård Lars
Johansson Ingegerd
Hallmans Göran
Weinehall Lars
Andersson Henrik
Winkvist Anna
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. sofia.klingberg@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):993-1001
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Phytosterols - administration & dosage
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Plant sterols are bioactive compounds, found in all vegetable foods, which inhibit cholesterol absorption. Little is known about the effect of habitual natural dietary intake of plant sterols. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relation between plant sterol density (in mg/MJ) and serum concentrations of cholesterol in men and women in northern Sweden. DESIGN: The analysis included 37 150 men and 40 502 women aged 29-61 y, all participants in the Västerbotten Intervention Program. RESULTS: Higher plant sterol density was associated with lower serum total cholesterol in both sexes and with lower LDL cholesterol in women. After adjustment for age, body mass index (in kg/m(2)), and (in women) menopausal status, men with high plant sterol density (quintile 5) had 0.15 mmol/L (2.6%) lower total serum cholesterol (P for trend = 0.001) and 0.13 mmol/L (3.1%) lower LDL cholesterol (P = 0.062) than did men with low plant sterol density (quintile 1). The corresponding figures for women were 0.20 mmol/L (3.5%) lower total serum cholesterol (P for trend
PubMed ID
18400724 View in PubMed
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Berry fruits: Compositional elements, biochemical activities, and the impact of their intake on human health, performance, and disease

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87074
Source
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2008 Feb 13;56(3):627-629
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-2008
Author
Seeram, NP
Author Affiliation
Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. nseeram@mail.uri.edu
Source
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2008 Feb 13;56(3):627-629
Date
Feb-13-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blueberry Plant - chemistry
Cardiovascular diseases
Diet
Flavonoids - analysis
Fragaria - chemistry
Fruit - chemistry
Health promotion
Humans
Neoplasms
Obesity
Punicaceae - chemistry
Rosaceae - chemistry
Tannins - analysis
Vaccinium macrocarpon - chemistry
Abstract
An overwhelming body of research has now firmly established that the dietary intake of berry fruits has a positive and profound impact on human health, performance, and disease. Berry fruits, which are commercially cultivated and commonly consumed in fresh and processed forms in North America, include blackberry ( Rubus spp.), black raspberry ( Rubus occidentalis), blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum), cranberry (i.e., the American cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, distinct from the European cranberry, V. oxycoccus), red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus) and strawberry ( Fragaria x ananassa). Other berry fruits, which are lesser known but consumed in the traditional diets of North American tribal communities, include chokecherry ( Prunus virginiana), highbush cranberry ( Viburnum trilobum), serviceberry ( Amelanchier alnifolia), and silver buffaloberry ( Shepherdia argentea). In addition, berry fruits such as arctic bramble ( Rubus articus), bilberries ( Vaccinuim myrtillus; also known as bog whortleberries), black currant ( Ribes nigrum), boysenberries ( Rubus spp.), cloudberries ( Rubus chamaemorus), crowberries ( Empetrum nigrum, E. hermaphroditum), elderberries ( Sambucus spp.), gooseberry ( Ribes uva-crispa), lingonberries ( Vaccinium vitis-idaea), loganberry ( Rubus loganobaccus), marionberries ( Rubus spp.), Rowan berries ( Sorbus spp.), and sea buckthorn ( Hippophae rhamnoides), are also popularly consumed in other parts of the world. Recently, there has also been a surge in the consumption of exotic "berry-type" fruits such as the pomegranate ( Punica granatum), goji berries ( Lycium barbarum; also known as wolfberry), mangosteen ( Garcinia mangostana), the Brazilian açaí berry ( Euterpe oleraceae), and the Chilean maqui berry ( Aristotelia chilensis). Given the wide consumption of berry fruits and their potential impact on human health and disease, conferences and symposia that target the latest scientific research (and, of equal importance, the dissemination of this information to the general public), on the chemistry and biological and physiological functions of these "superfoods" are necessary.
PubMed ID
18211023 View in PubMed
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Pharmacogenomics of metabolic effects of rosiglitazone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87140
Source
Pharmacogenomics. 2008 Feb;9(2):141-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Seda Ondrej
Sedová Lucie
Oliyarnyk Olena
Kazdová Ludmila
Krenová Drahomíra
Corbeil Gilles
Hamet Pavel
Tremblay Johanne
Kren Vladimír
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Centre de Recherche, Technôpole Angus, 2901 Rachel East, Office 314, Montréal, Québec H1W 4A4, Canada.
Source
Pharmacogenomics. 2008 Feb;9(2):141-55
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - drug effects - metabolism
Adipose Tissue, White - drug effects - metabolism
Animals
Cholesterol, Dietary - pharmacology
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - pharmacology
Fatty Acids - pharmacology
Gene Expression - drug effects
Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Glycogen - biosynthesis
Hypoglycemic Agents - pharmacology
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - biosynthesis
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Metabolic Syndrome X - genetics - metabolism
Microarray Analysis
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
RNA - biosynthesis - isolation & purification
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Strains
Sucrose - pharmacology
Thiazolidinediones - pharmacology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Thiazolidinediones are increasingly used drugs for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. The individual response to thiazolidinedione therapy, ranging from the variable degree of metabolic improvement to harmful side-effects, is empirical, yet the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In order to assess the pharmacogenomic component of thiazolidinediones' metabolic action, we compared the effect of rosiglitazone in two genetically defined models of metabolic syndrome, polydactylous (PD) and BN.SHR4 inbred rat strains, with their insulin-sensitive, normolipidemic counterpart, the Brown Norway (BN) rat. MATERIALS & METHODS: 5-month-old male rats were fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks, and the experimental groups received rosiglitazone (0.4 mg/100 g body weight) during the last 2 weeks of high-fat diet feeding. We assessed metabolic and morphometric profiles, oxidative stress parameters and gene expression in white adipose tissue. RESULTS: In many followed parameters, we observed genetic background-specific effects of rosiglitazone administration. The mass and the sensitivity of visceral adipose tissue to insulin-stimulated lipogenesis increased with rosiglitazone treatment only in PD, correlating with a PD-specific significant increase in expression of prostaglandin D2 synthase. The glucose tolerance was enhanced in all strains, although fasting plasma glucose was increased by rosiglitazone in BN and BN.SHR4. Among the markers of lipid peroxidation, we observed the rosiglitazone-driven increase of plasma-conjugated dienes only in BN.SHR4. The genes with genotype-specific expression change included ADAM metallopeptidase domain 7, aquaporin 9, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B, caveolin 1, catechol-O-methyl transferase, leptin and prostaglandin D2 synthase 2. CONCLUSION: Rosiglitazone's effects on lipid deposition and insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues are largely dependent on the genetic background it acts upon.
PubMed ID
18370844 View in PubMed
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2953 records – page 1 of 296.