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Causes of death in childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes: long-term follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290006
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):56-63
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017

Cancer Treatment Delays in American Indians and Alaska Natives Enrolled in Medicare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290092
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2017; 28(1):350-361
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Scott V Adams
Aasthaa Bansal
Andrea N Burnett-Hartman
Stacey A Cohen
Andrew Karnopp
Victoria Warren-Mears
Scott D Ramsey
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2017; 28(1):350-361
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Colorectal Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Comorbidity
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Male
Medicare - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Prostatic Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Residence Characteristics
SEER Program
Sex
Socioeconomic Factors
Time-to-Treatment - statistics & numerical data
United States
United States Indian Health Service - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess whether timing of initial post-diagnosis cancer care differs between American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) and non-Hispanic White (NHW) patients, we accessed SEER-Medicare data for breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancers (2001-2007). Medicare claims data were examined for initiation of cancer-directed treatment. Overall, AI/ANs experienced longer median times to starting treatment than NHWs (45 and 39 days, p < .001) and lower rates of treatment initiation (HR[95%CI]: 0.86[0.79-0.93]). Differences were largest for prostate (HR: 0.80[0.71-0.89]) and smallest for breast cancer (HR: 0.96[0.83-1.11]). American Indians / Alaska Natives also had elevated odds of greater than 10 weeks between diagnosis and treatment compared with NHWs (OR[95% CI]: 1.37[1.16-1.63]), especially for prostate cancer (OR: 1.41[1.14-1.76]). Adjustment for comorbidity and socio-demographic factors attenuated associations except for prostate cancer. In this insured population, we observed evidence that AI/ANs start cancer therapy later than NHWs. The modest magnitude of delays suggests that they are unlikely to be a determinant of survival disparities.
PubMed ID
28239006 View in PubMed
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Cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength in late adolescence and long-term risk of early heart failure in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290260
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2017 05; 24(8):876-884
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
Martin Lindgren
Maria Åberg
Maria Schaufelberger
David Åberg
Linus Schiöler
Kjell Torén
Annika Rosengren
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2017 05; 24(8):876-884
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Exercise Test
Health status
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Muscle strength
Prognosis
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Aims To investigate the association between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and muscle strength in late adolescence and the long-term risk of heart failure (HF). Methods A cohort was created of Swedish men enrolled in compulsory military service between 1968 and 2005 with measurements for CRF and muscle strength ( n?=?1,226,623; mean age 18.3 years). They were followed until 31 December 2014 for HF hospitalization as recorded in the Swedish national inpatient registry. Results During the follow-up period (median (interquartile range) 28.4 (22.0-37.0) years), 7656 cases of first HF hospitalization were observed (mean?±?SD age at diagnosis 50.1?±?7.9 years). CRF and muscle strength were estimated by maximum capacity cycle ergometer testing and strength exercises (knee extension, elbow flexion and hand grip). Inverse dose-response relationships were found between CRF and muscle strength with HF as a primary or contributory diagnosis with an adjusted hazards ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.60 (1.44-1.77) for low CRF and 1.45 (1.32-1.58) for low muscle strength categories. The associations of incident HF with CRF and muscle strength persisted, regardless of adjustments for the other potential confounders. The highest risk was observed for HF associated with coronary heart disease, diabetes or hypertension. Conclusions In this longitudinal study of young men, we found inverse and mutually independent associations between CRF and muscle strength with risk of hospitalization for HF. If causal, these results may emphasize the importance of the promotion of CRF and muscle strength in younger populations.
PubMed ID
28164716 View in PubMed
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The HNF1A mutant Ala180Val: Clinical challenges in determining causality of a rare HNF1A variant in familial diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290369
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2017 Nov; 133:142-149
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
J V Sagen
L Bjørkhaug
B I Haukanes
L Grevle
J Molnes
B G Nedrebø
O Søvik
P R Njølstad
S Johansson
A Molven
Author Affiliation
Hormone Laboratory, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Jorn.Sagen@uib.no.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2017 Nov; 133:142-149
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Hela Cells
Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha - genetics
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation, Missense
Norway
Pedigree
Phenotype
Young Adult
Abstract
Heterozygous mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor-1A (HNF1A) cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 (MODY3). Our aim was to compare two families with suspected dominantly inherited diabetes and a new HNF1A variant of unknown clinical significance.
The HNF1A gene was sequenced in two independently recruited families from the Norwegian MODY Registry. Both familes were phenotyped clinically and biochemically. Microsatellite markers around and within the HNF1A locus were used for haplotyping. Chromosomal linkage analysis was performed in one family, and whole-exome sequencing was undertaken in two affected family members from each family. Transactivation activity, DNA binding and nuclear localization of wild type and mutant HNF-1A were assessed.
The novel HNF1A variant c.539C>T (p.Ala180Val) was found in both families. The variant fully co-segregated with diabetes in one family. In the other family, two subjects with diabetes mellitus and one with normal glucose levels were homozygous variant carriers. Chromosomal linkage of diabetes to the HNF1A locus or to other genomic regions could not be established. The protein functional studies did not reveal significant differences between wild type and variant HNF-1A. In each family, whole-exome sequencing failed to identify any other variant that could explain the disease.
The HNF1A variant p.Ala180Val does not seem to cause MODY3, although it may confer risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our data demonstrate challenges in causality evaluation of rare variants detected in known diabetes genes.
PubMed ID
28934671 View in PubMed
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Differences between asthma-COPD overlap syndrome and adult-onset asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290402
Source
Eur Respir J. 2017 May; 49(5):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Minna Tommola
Pinja Ilmarinen
Leena E Tuomisto
Lauri Lehtimäki
Jussi Haanpää
Onni Niemelä
Hannu Kankaanranta
Author Affiliation
Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland minna.tommola@epshp.fi.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2017 May; 49(5):
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Asthma - complications - diagnosis
Biomarkers - blood
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Leukocyte Count
Male
Middle Aged
Neutrophils - cytology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - diagnosis
Smoking - epidemiology
Spirometry
Syndrome
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Differences between asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) and adult-onset asthma are poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate these differences in a clinical cohort of patients with adult-onset asthma, as a part of the Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study (SAAS).188 patients were diagnosed with adult-onset asthma and re-evaluated 12 years after diagnosis. They were divided into three groups based on smoking history and post bronchodilator spirometry values: 1) never- and ex-smokers with
PubMed ID
28461298 View in PubMed
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Juvenile myasthenia gravis in Norway: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and long-term outcome in a nationwide population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290875
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2017 Sep; 21(5):707-714
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
T H Popperud
M I Boldingh
M Rasmussen
E Kerty
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Unit for Hereditary and Inborn Neuromuscular Disorders, Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.h.popperud@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2017 Sep; 21(5):707-714
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Child
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myasthenia Gravis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Thymectomy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to characterize juvenile myasthenia gravis in a national population-based cohort in Norway, and to evaluate long-term outcome and potential differences correlated with prepubertal versus postpubertal disease onset.
Patients with onset of myasthenia gravis aged =18 years were identified through multiple strategies. Retrospective clinical data were collected by means of medical charts. All patients had an updated clinical examination. Cases were divided into prepubertal and postpubertal onset using age 12 years as the cut off.
In total, 75 patients were identified of whom 63 were included in the study: 21 in the prepubertal and 42 in the postpubertal onset group. There was a female preponderance in both groups. In total, 59% presented with ocular symptoms, but the great majority of patients in both groups generalized during the two first years of the disease. Myasthenic crisis was more frequent in the prepubertal onset group. All patients were initially treated with pyridostigmine, 26 with steroids, and 17 with other immunosuppressive treatment. The postpubertal cases were more often treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Fifty patients (79%) underwent thymectomy. The general outcome was favourable: 57% became asymptomatic and only four subjects failed to attain clinical improvement. One-third had at least one additional autoimmune disease.
Despite frequent symptom generalization and a subgroup of prepubertal onset with severe disease, the long-term outcome was good, especially in the thymectomized prepubertal onset group. Polyautoimmunity occurred in both groups in one-third.
PubMed ID
28457757 View in PubMed
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The effect of smoking on lung function: a clinical study of adult-onset asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291042
Source
Eur Respir J. 2016 11; 48(5):1298-1306
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2016
Author
Minna Tommola
Pinja Ilmarinen
Leena E Tuomisto
Jussi Haanpää
Terhi Kankaanranta
Onni Niemelä
Hannu Kankaanranta
Author Affiliation
Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland minna.tommola@epshp.fi.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2016 11; 48(5):1298-1306
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Asthma - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Phenotype
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Spirometry
Treatment Outcome
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of smoking on lung function decline in adult-onset asthma in a clinical, 12-year follow-up study.In the Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study, 203 patients were followed for 12 years (1999-2013) after diagnosis of new-onset adult asthma. Patients were divided into two groups based on smoking history:
PubMed ID
27660515 View in PubMed
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BMI and Mortality in Patients With New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: A Comparison With Age- and Sex-Matched Control Subjects From the General Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292681
Source
Diabetes Care. 2018 03; 41(3):485-493
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Jon Edqvist
Araz Rawshani
Martin Adiels
Lena Björck
Marcus Lind
Ann-Marie Svensson
Sofia Gudbjörnsdottir
Naveed Sattar
Annika Rosengren
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden jon.edqvist@gu.se.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2018 03; 41(3):485-493
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - metabolism - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Overweight - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes is strongly associated with obesity, but the mortality risk related to elevated body weight in people with type 2 diabetes compared with people without diabetes has not been established.
We prospectively assessed short- and long-term mortality in people with type 2 diabetes with a recorded diabetes duration =5 years identified from the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) between 1998 and 2012 and five age- and sex-matched control subjects per study participant from the general population.
Over a median follow-up of 5.5 years, there were 17,546 deaths among 149,345 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 59.6 years [40% women]) and 68,429 deaths among 743,907 matched control subjects. Short-term all-cause mortality risk (=5 years) displayed a U-shaped relationship with BMI, with hazard ratios (HRs) ranging from 0.81 (95% CI 0.75-0.88) among patients with diabetes and BMI 30 to
PubMed ID
29298801 View in PubMed
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Comparison of mid-age-onset and late-onset Huntington's disease in Finnish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292698
Source
J Neurol. 2017 Oct; 264(10):2095-2100
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Jussi O T Sipilä
Tommi Kauko
Markku Päivärinta
Kari Majamaa
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. jussi.sipila@utu.fi.
Source
J Neurol. 2017 Oct; 264(10):2095-2100
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Huntingtin Protein - genetics
Huntington Disease - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Statistics, nonparametric
Trinucleotide Repeats - genetics
Abstract
The phenotype of juvenile Huntington's disease (HD) differs clearly from that of adult-onset HD, but information about differences between mid-age-onset HD and late-onset HD (LOHD) is scarce. A national cohort of 206 patients with adult-onset HD was identified using national registries and patient records. LOHD was defined as age =60 years at HD diagnosis. Genetic disease burden was assessed using CAG age product (CAP) score. LOHD comprised 25% of the adult-onset HD cohort giving a point prevalence of 2.38/100,000 in the Finnish population at least 60 years of age. The proportion of LOHD out of new HD diagnoses increased from 21% in 1991-2000 to 33% in 2001-2010. At the time of diagnosis, patients with LOHD had 10.4 units (95% CI 4.8-15.9; p = 0.0003) higher CAP scores, more severe motor impairment and slightly more severe functional impairment than that in patients with mid-age-onset HD. There was no difference in the rate of disease progression or survival between LOHD and mid-age-onset patients. The lifespans of deceased patients were shorter in mid-age-onset HD (p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
28849405 View in PubMed
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Excess Mortality in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Without Albuminuria-Separating the Contribution of Early and Late Risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293024
Source
Diabetes Care. 2018 04; 41(4):748-754
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Per-Henrik Groop
Merlin Thomas
Maija Feodoroff
Carol Forsblom
Valma Harjutsalo
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland per-henrik.groop@helsinki.fi.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2018 04; 41(4):748-754
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Albuminuria - epidemiology - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - mortality
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The current study investigated whether the risk of mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes without any signs of albuminuria is different than in the general population and matched control subjects without diabetes.
We studied a nationwide, population-based Finnish register of 10,737 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during 1980-2005 and followed for 10 years and 2,544 adults with long-standing diabetes drawn from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study (FinnDiane). Mortality was compared with the general Finnish population and 6,655 control subjects without diabetes.
The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was increased during the first 10 years after the diagnosis (2.58 [95% CI 2.07-3.18], P
Notes
CommentIn: Diabetes Care. 2018 Apr;41(4):662-663 PMID 29559452
PubMed ID
29378776 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.