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Fatigue and workload among Danish fishermen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294547
Source
Int Marit Health. 2017; 68(4):252-259
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Line Nørgaard Remmen
Kimmo Herttua
Jørgen Riss-Jepsen
Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health - Unit for Health Promotion, Univesity of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Vej 9, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark. lremmen@health.sdu.dk.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2017; 68(4):252-259
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise
Fatigue - epidemiology
Fisheries
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupational Stress - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
Fishery is a hazardous occupation and fatigue may contribute to the observed risks. This study aims to investigate the association between workload and fatigue among Danish fishermen.
The cross-sectional survey of demographic characteristics and self-reported exposure and health data was performed on a random sample of 270 active fishermen. We applied the validated Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) to assess the degrees of the different dimensions of perceived fatigue. We estimated physical workload using questions regarding the frequency of seven physical work activities and analysed the association between fatigue and workload using multiple linear regressions.
The mean fatigue scores were 9.18 (SD 3.58) for general fatigue, 9.05 (SD 3.36) for physical fatigue, 7.57 (SD 3.03) for reduced activity and 7.16 (SD 3.07) for mental fatigue. Highest levels of fatigue were observed among fishermen at Danish seiners (mean 10.21), and fatigue scores decreased with more days at sea. However, none of these results were significant. Adjusted analyses showed that physical workload was significantly related to general fatigue (b = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.12-0.28), physical fatigue (b = 0.10, 95% CI: 0.04-0.16) and mental fatigue (b = 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.16). Reduced activity was unrelated to work exposures.
General fatigue was the dominant fatigue dimension among Danish fishermen and it is mostly associated with physical workload. Physical workload was additionally significantly associated to the levels of physical and mental fatigue. Fishermen had a lower average score for all fatigue dimensions compared to those seen in general Danish working population. Prospective studies are required to assess whether the identified associations are causal.
PubMed ID
29297577 View in PubMed
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Patient characteristics and cancer prevalence in the Danish cancer patient pathway for patients with serious non-specific symptoms and signs of cancer-A nationwide, population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289913
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 10; 50(Pt A):166-172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2017
Author
E Moseholm
B Ø Lindhardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Nordsjælland Dyrehavevej 29, DK-3400 Hillerød, Denmark. Electronic address: elml@ssi.dk.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 10; 50(Pt A):166-172
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Prevalence
Registries
Abstract
A new cancer patient pathway for patients presenting with non-specific signs and symptoms (NSSC-CPP) was implemented nationally in Denmark in 2012. This study aims to describe, on a national level, the characteristics of patients referred to the Danish NSSC-CPP, and to estimate the prevalence and distribution of cancers and other diagnosis in this population.
A population-based cohort study using the Danish national registries, including all patients who completed a diagnostic course through the NSSC-CPP between 2012 and 2015. Cancer prevalence is presented as the percentage of included patients who were diagnosed with cancer after completing a NSSC-CPP diagnostic course. Associations between patient characteristics and cancer diagnosis were estimated in a multivariate logistic regression model.
The mean age of the 23,934 patients included in the analysis was 64.6 years and 47% where male. In total, 11% of all patients received a cancer diagnosis after completing a diagnostic course in the NSSC-CPP; the most common types were breast cancer (18%) hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue cancer (15%), and malignant melanoma (12%). The most common non-cancer diagnosis was non-specific symptoms/observation (54%). Fifty-five patients were diagnosed with cancer within six months following a non-cancer diagnosis in the NSSC-CPP.
The prevalence of cancer in the NSSC-CPP was 11%. The most common cancer diagnosis was breast cancer, hematopoietic and lymphoid cancer and malignant melanoma. A small proportion of patients receiving a non-cancer diagnosis in the NSSC-CPP were diagnosed with cancer in the six months following their NSSC-CPP course.
PubMed ID
28807680 View in PubMed
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An enhanced Enterovirus surveillance system allows identification and characterization of rare and emerging respiratory enteroviruses in Denmark, 2015-16.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289924
Source
J Clin Virol. 2017 08; 93:40-44
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2017
Author
Céline Barnadas
Sofie E Midgley
Marianne N Skov
Lotte Jensen
Mille W Poulsen
Thea Kølsen Fischer
Author Affiliation
European Programme for Public Health Microbiology Training (EUPHEM), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden; Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: cebs@ssi.dk.
Source
J Clin Virol. 2017 08; 93:40-44
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - virology
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Enterovirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Phylogeny
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
The potential for outbreaks due to Enteroviruses (EV) with respiratory tropism, such as EV-D68, and the detection of new and rare EV species C is a concern. These EVs are typically not detected in stool specimens and may therefore be missed by standard EV surveillance systems. Following the North American outbreak of EV-D68 in 2014, Denmark piloted an enhanced EV surveillance system that included the screening of respiratory samples.
We aim to report clinical manifestations and phylogenetic descriptions from the rare and emerging EVs identified thereby demonstrating the usefulness of this system.
Positive EV samples received through the enhanced non-polio EV pilot surveillance system were characterized by sequencing fragments of VP1, VP2 and VP4 capsid proteins and clinical observations were compiled.
Between January 2015 and October 2016, six cases of rare genotypes EV-C104, C105 and C109 and nine cases of EV-D68 were identified. Patients presented with mild to moderately severe respiratory illness; no paralysis occurred. Distinct EV-C104, EV-C109 and EV-D68 sequences argue against a common source of introduction of these genotypes in the Danish population.
The enhanced EV surveillance system enabled detection and characterization of rare EVs in Denmark. In order to improve our knowledge of and our preparedness against emerging EVs, public health laboratories should consider expanding their EV surveillance system to include respiratory specimens.
PubMed ID
28618288 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and characteristics of self-reported physical and mental disorders among adults with hearing loss in Denmark: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289927
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2017 07; 52(7):807-813
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-2017
Author
Jesper Dammeyer
Madeleine Chapman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2a, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. jesper.dammeyer@psy.ku.dk.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2017 07; 52(7):807-813
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Hearing Loss - epidemiology
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Self Report
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Existing research shows that people with hearing loss have a high risk of additional physical and mental disorders. However, only a few population-based studies have been conducted. This study assesses the prevalence and characteristics of additional disorders among adults with hearing loss in Denmark and thereby contributes a population-based study to this area of research.
Data on self-reported physical and mental disorders from a national survey of 772 adults with hearing loss were compared to corresponding data from a national survey of 18,017 adults from the general population.
People with hearing loss reported more physical and mental disorders than the general population. Specifically, they reported higher incidences of visual impairment, cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, and "other mental disorders".
Adults with hearing loss have a greater risk of additional physical and mental disorders. It is important for clinicians to have some understanding of the communication needs and characteristics of deaf and hard-of-hearing patients, so that they can recognize and treat symptoms and provide appropriate support.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28555382 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dyslipidemia and reference values for fasting plasma lipid concentrations in Danish/North-European White children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289937
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2017 04 28; 17(1):116
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-28-2017
Author
Tenna Ruest Haarmark Nielsen
Ulrik Lausten-Thomsen
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Christine Bøjsøe
Lise Pedersen
Palle Skov Bratholm
Torben Hansen
Oluf Pedersen
Jens-Christian Holm
Author Affiliation
The Children's Obesity Clinic, Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital Holbæk, Smedelundsgade 60, DK 4300, Holbæk, Denmark. ter@regionsjaelland.dk.
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2017 04 28; 17(1):116
Date
04-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Biomarkers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Fasting
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Pediatric Obesity - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Triglycerides - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Dyslipidemia is reported in 27 - 43% of children and adolescents with overweight/obesity and tracks into adulthood, increasing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity. Cut-off values for fasting plasma lipid concentrations are typically set at fixed levels throughout childhood. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to generate fasting plasma lipid references for a Danish/North-European White population-based cohort of children and adolescents, and investigate the prevalence of dyslipidemia in this cohort as well as in a cohort with overweight/obesity.
A population-based cohort of 2141 (1275 girls) children and adolescents aged 6 - 19 (median 11.5) years was recruited from 11 municipalities in Denmark. Additionally, a cohort of children and adolescents of 1421 (774 girls) with overweight/obesity aged 6 - 19 years (median 11.8) was recruited for the study. Height, weight, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations were measured on all participants. Smoothed reference curves and percentiles were generated using the Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape package in the statistical software R.
In the population-based cohort, plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC) (P 
Notes
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PubMed ID
28454530 View in PubMed
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Chronic Neurodegenerative Illnesses and Epilepsy in Danish Adventists and Baptists: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289954
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 56(4):1429-1435
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Lau Caspar Thygesen
Louise NØrreslet Gimsing
Andrea Bautz
Niels Christian Hvidt
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 56(4):1429-1435
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson disease - epidemiology
Protestantism
Abstract
Limited knowledge of the influence of lifestyle risk factors and religious living on chronic neurological diseases exists. Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) do not consume tobacco, alcohol, or pork, and many adhere to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, and Baptists discourage excessive use of alcohol and tobacco.
We investigated whether the incidence of four common chronic neurological illnesses: dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy in a large cohort of Danish Adventists and Baptists was different compared to the general Danish population. Three of the illnesses are neurodegenerative, whereas epilepsy can occur at any age.
We compared hospital admission rates for some major neurological diseases among members of the Danish Religious Societies Health Study comprising 6,532 SDA and 3,720 Baptists with the general Danish population. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) stratified by sex, age, and calendar time were calculated.
SIR of dementia or Alzheimer's disease was significantly decreased for members of both communities (SDA, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-#x2013;0.90 and Baptists, 0.59; 0.47-#x2013;0.73). The SIRs of Parkinson's disease and epilepsy were not significantly different compared to the general population.
We observe reduced incidence for dementia or Alzheimer's disease in a large cohort of members of two religious communities characterized by lifestyle recommendations. More studies are needed to disentangle the interaction between such lifestyle and other components of the religious belief system.
PubMed ID
28128767 View in PubMed
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Gastrointestinal Disorders in the Danish Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289958
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 05; 28(3):354-360
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
05-2017
Author
Jaimie L Gradus
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Elisabeth Svensson
Vera Ehrenstein
Timothy L Lash
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the aNational Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA; bDepartments of Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Boston University, Boston, MA; cDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and dDepartment of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 05; 28(3):354-360
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Evidence for the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders is mixed, owing in part to methodologic differences across studies. Furthermore, studies which have combined GI disorders or symptoms for examination as one overall category may potentially obscure associations between PTSD and individual GI diagnoses.
This nationwide cohort study examined the incidence of all major nonmalignant GI disorders in patients with a prior PTSD diagnosis (n = 4,076), compared with the general population incidence from 1995 to 2013, using Danish medical registry data. We examined differences by sex, age, marital status, psychiatric and somatic comorbidity, and follow-up time. Risks, standardized incidence rates (SIRs), and confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated.
Risk of any GI disorder among PTSD patients was 25% (95% CI: 21%, 29%); the SIR for any GI disorder was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.7, 2.0). Risk and SIRs varied by disorder (e.g., no association with diverticula of the intestines [SIR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.5]; stronger association with peptic ulcer, site unspecified [SIR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.8, 5.5]). Stratified analyses revealed that some associations were stronger for persons ages 16-39 or unmarried at PTSD diagnosis, persons with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, and in the year following PTSD diagnosis.
This study documents associations between clinician-diagnosed PTSD and all major nonmalignant GI disorders in an unselected nationwide cohort with long follow-up. Differences in associations across GI disorders and important modifiers may account for previous conflicting research findings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28099266 View in PubMed
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Daylight Savings Time Transitions and the Incidence Rate of Unipolar Depressive Episodes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289978
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 05; 28(3):346-353
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
Bertel T Hansen
Kim M Sønderskov
Ida Hageman
Peter T Dinesen
Søren D Østergaard
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Political Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; bDepartment of Political Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; cDepartment of Political Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; dPsychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; eDepartment of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; and fPsychosis Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiology. 2017 05; 28(3):346-353
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Registries
Seasons
Time
Abstract
Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate of depressive episodes. This seems likely because daylight savings time transitions affect circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we investigated the effects of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes.
Using time series intervention analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012, we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted trend in the incidence rate.
The analyses were based on 185,419 hospital contacts for unipolar depression and showed that the transition from summer time to standard time were associated with an 11% increase (95% CI = 7%, 15%) in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes that dissipated over approximately 10 weeks. The transition from standard time to summer time was not associated with a parallel change in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes.
This study shows that the transition from summer time to standard time was associated with an increase in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Distress associated with the sudden advancement of sunset, marking the coming of a long period of short days, may explain this finding. See video abstract at, http://links.lww.com/EDE/B179.
Notes
CommentIn: BMJ. 2016 Oct 31;355:i5857 PMID 27803014
PubMed ID
27775953 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and depression in Denmark 1996-2010: national data stratified by occupational status and annual income.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289985
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):108-114
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017
Author
B Cleal
U H Panton
I Willaing
R I G Holt
Author Affiliation
Steno Health Promotion Research, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):108-114
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Poverty
Registries
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - drug therapy - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the socio-economic distribution of comorbid depression and diabetes among the Danish workforce using national registry data.
Using national registers, all eligible Danish adults aged 18-59 years on 1 January 1996 were followed until 31 December 2010. Diabetes status was obtained from the Danish National Diabetes Register and information on purchase of prescription antidepressants from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Data were also obtained on people's occupational status and gross annual income. The people included in the study were stratified according to their highest occupational group during the study period. Annual incomes were adjusted to 2013 levels and, using the distribution of the study population's incomes, we stratified participants into income quintiles.
A total of 3 434 420 individuals met the inclusion criteria at baseline, with 98 006 developing diabetes during follow-up. There were 603 498 new prescriptions of antidepressants during follow-up; 19 849 (20.3%) among people with diabetes and 583 649 (17.5%) among those without. People with diabetes in all income quintiles (risk ratio 1.65; 95% CI 1.62-1.67) and all occupational groups (risk ratio 1.70; 95% CI 1.68- 1.73) had a significantly elevated risk compared with the general population. Risk ratios were significantly higher among the lowest occupational groups and income quintiles.
Our results provide robust data underlining the associations between diabetes, depression and socio-economic status. They highlight and encourage further focus on the issue of comorbid diabetes and depression, particularly among the most disadvantaged.
PubMed ID
27425221 View in PubMed
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Increased mortality in a Danish cohort of young people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus followed for 24 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290005
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 03; 34(3):380-386
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
K Sandahl
L B Nielsen
J Svensson
J Johannesen
F Pociot
H B Mortensen
P Hougaard
R Broe
M L Rasmussen
J Grauslund
T Peto
B S Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 03; 34(3):380-386
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications - mortality - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Mortality
Prospective Studies
Registries
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the mortality rate in a Danish cohort of children and adolescents diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes mellitus compared with the general population.
In 1987 and 1989 we included 884 children and 1020 adolescents aged 20 years and under, corresponding to 75% of all Danish children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, in two nationwide studies in Denmark. Those who had participated in both investigations (n = 720) were followed until 1 January 2014, using the Danish Civil Registration System on death certificates and emigration. We derived the expected number of deaths in the cohort, using population data values from Statistics Denmark to calculate the standardized mortality ratio. Survival analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model.
During the 24 years of follow-up, 49 (6.8%) patients died, resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 4.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5, 6.2) compared with the age-standardized general population. A 1% increase in baseline HbA1c (1989), available in 718 of 720 patients, was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 1.6; P
PubMed ID
27027777 View in PubMed
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