Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Infant, mother, and contextual predictors of mother-very low birth weight infant interaction at 9 months of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176112
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2005 Feb;26(1):24-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Nancy Feeley
Laurie Gottlieb
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nursing Research, S.M.B.D. Jewish General Hospital, 3755 Côte St. Catherine Road, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1E2. nancy.feeley@mcgill.ca
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2005 Feb;26(1):24-33
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - psychology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Education
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - psychology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Abstract
This prospective study examined how characteristics of infants (i.e., birth weight and perinatal illness severity), mothers (i.e., anxiety and level of education), and the social context (i.e., maternal received and perceived helpfulness of support) related to mother-very low birth weight (VLBW) infant interaction in 72 dyads. Infant, mother, and contextual factors were assessed at 3 and 9 months of age, and mothers and infants were observed in teaching interactions at 9 months. Dyads whose interaction was more sensitive and responsive included mothers who were better educated and less anxious at 3 months and reported higher perceived support at 3 months. The findings highlight the importance of maternal education and well-being in the parenting of VLBW infants.
PubMed ID
15718880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mothers and fathers of very low-birthweight infants: similarities and differences in the first year after birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160524
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;36(6):558-67
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy Feeley
Laurie Gottlieb
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Centre for Nursing Research, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. nancy.feeley@mcgill.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;36(6):558-67
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Fathers - education - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal Behavior
Middle Aged
Mothers - education - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Abstract
To compare the psychosocial adjustment and the quality of interaction with their infant of mothers and fathers of very low-birthweight infants at two time points in the first year of the infant's life.
Quantitative, longitudinal design.
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of two Canadian urban hospitals.
Sixty-one couples who had an infant born weighing less than 1,500 g.
State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Parenting Sense of Competence questionnaire, and the Support in Parenting Questionnaire were completed at 3 and 9 months of age. Parent-infant interaction was observed at 9 months and scored with the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale.
Fathers' reported parenting self-efficacy was significantly lower than mothers' at both 3 and 9 months of age. Fathers reported more received support than mothers, and the amount of support that both mothers and fathers reported increased significantly from the 3-month to the 9-month assessment. Mothers and fathers reported similar levels of anxiety and perceived helpfulness of the support they received and were equally sensitive and responsive in interactions with their infants at 9 months of age.
Similarities and differences between mothers and fathers were observed. It is important for nurses to assess mothers and fathers, how any differences are perceived by the couple, and how any differences might be affecting them during the neonatal intensive care unit hospitalization and in early months after discharge.
PubMed ID
17973699 View in PubMed
Less detail

Obstetric and neonatology nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to the management of symptoms of maternal depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129716
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(12):735-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marianne Sofronas
Nancy Feeley
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Melanie Sabbagh
Author Affiliation
Montreal Neurological Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(12):735-44
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birthing centers
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression, Postpartum - nursing - prevention & control
Depressive Disorder - nursing - prevention & control
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Neonatal Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Obstetric Nursing
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - nursing - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Although maternal depression is a common emotional disorder, assessment and intervention rates are low. Using a cross-sectional survey design, we examined attitudes, beliefs, and practices of obstetrical and neonatology nurses toward the management of symptoms of maternal depression (SMD). Nurses believed they were responsible to assess for SMD and intervene with women showing SMD. However, only 50% assessed for SMD at least once monthly. Identified barriers to care were: lack of time, training, language, and patient and family beliefs. NICU nurses reported lower confidence, knowledge, and skills, than other nurses who participated in this study. This study shows there is a need to enhance nurses? confidence in assessing and intervening with SMD, and to clarify the referral process.
PubMed ID
22077746 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors associated with depression in pregnant immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176188
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2004 Dec;41(4):445-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Joy Schinazi
Lilly Katofsky
Jean François Saucier
Marta Valenzuela
Ruta Westreich
Joelle Dayan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Canada. phyllis.zelkowitz@mcgill.ca
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2004 Dec;41(4):445-64
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Depressive Disorder - ethnology - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Marriage
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - psychology
Risk factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
This study examined psychosocial risk factors for depressive symptomatology in a community sample of pregnant immigrant women in Montreal, Canada. One hundred and nineteen participants were recruited through hospitals and responded to questionnaires assessing depression, somatic symptoms, functional status, social support, stressful life events and marital adjustment. Forty-two percent of participants scored above the cut-off for depression. Depressive symptoms were associated with poorer functional status and more somatic symptoms. Depressed women reported a lack of social support, more stressful life events and poorer marital adjustment. Transitions associated with migration may place pregnant immigrant women at high risk for depression.
PubMed ID
15709645 View in PubMed
Less detail