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Work instability and financial loss in early inflammatory arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117912
Source
Int J Rheum Dis. 2012 Dec;15(6):546-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Karl J Looper
Sally S Mustafa
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Margaret Purden
Murray Baron
Author Affiliation
Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. karl.looper@mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Rheum Dis. 2012 Dec;15(6):546-53
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis - diagnosis - economics - physiopathology
Cost of Illness
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Income
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pain Measurement
Quebec
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave - economics
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Inflammatory arthritis is associated with a high degree of work instability and financial burden. In this study, we examine the extent of work instability and financial loss as well as their association with disease characteristics during the first 18 months of inflammatory arthritis.
One hundred and four patients in the early phase (more than 6 weeks,
PubMed ID
23253238 View in PubMed
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Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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