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Dietary intake and body mass index of adults in 2 Ojibwe communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201858
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1999 Jun;99(6):710-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
B. deGonzague
O. Receveur
D. Wedll
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1999 Jun;99(6):710-6
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Wisconsin
Abstract
To describe and compare dietary intake and prevalence of overweight in a sample of adults in 2 Ojibwe communities in Mille Lacs, Minn, and Lac Courte Oreilles, Wis.
Cross-sectional survey based on interviews that included a 24-hour recall, food frequency questionnaire, and a sociocultural questionnaire.
One hundred four adult Band (tribe) members were selected randomly from current housing lists; pregnant and lactating women were excluded.
Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to determine differences in absolute nutrient intakes where normality could not be assumed. Two-tailed t tests were conducted to test for differences between nutrient densities. A significance level of alpha = .05 was used; procedurewise adjustments were made using the Bonferroni method when adjusting for multiple comparisons.
The importance of the traditional food system was evident: at least 50% of respondents engaged in hunting and fishing practices. Prevalence of overweight was 47%. Mean nutrient intakes were below the Recommended Dietary Allowance for women for vitamin A, folate, calcium, iron, and zinc and for men for vitamin A and calcium, despite energy intakes that met the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Nutrient densities were lower than those in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for women for carbohydrate, vitamin C, folate, calcium, and dietary fiber and for men for folate and dietary fiber. Fat contributed 37% (for men) and 40% (for women) of energy intake.
Areas of focus for culturally relevant education programs (eg, promotion of traditional foods that provide nutrients of low intake status and low-fat traditional food preparation methods) and research needs are suggested to reduce risks for nutrition-related chronic disease among Native Americans.
PubMed ID
10361534 View in PubMed
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Assessment of dietary exposure to trace metals in Baffin Inuit food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6148
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Jul-Aug;103(7-8):740-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
H M Chan
C. Kim
K. Khoday
O. Receveur
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Jul-Aug;103(7-8):740-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cadmium - administration & dosage - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Inuits
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Male
Meat - analysis
Mercury - administration & dosage - analysis
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seals, Earless
Abstract
Chronic metal toxicity is a concern in the Canadian Arctic because of the findings of high metal levels in wildlife animals and the fact that traditional food constitutes a major component of the diet of indigenous peoples. We examined exposure to trace metals through traditional food resources for Inuit living in the community of Qikiqtarjuaq on Baffin Island in the eastern Arctic. Mercury, cadmium, and lead were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Elevated concentrations of mercury ( > 50 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, narwhal mattak, beluga meat, and beluga mattak, and relatively high concentrations of cadmium and lead ( > 100 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, mussels, and kelp. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by adult men and women ( > 20 years old) and children (3-12 years old). Based on traditional food consumption, the average daily intake levels of total mercury for both adults (65 micrograms for women and 97 micrograms for men) and children (38 micrograms) were higher than the Canadian average value (16 micrograms). The average weekly intake of mercury for all age groups exceeded the intake guidelines (5.0 micrograms/kg/day) established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants. The primary foods that contributed to metal intake for the Baffin Inuit were ringed seal meat, caribou meat, and kelp. We review the superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items and implications for monitoring metal contents of food, clinical symptoms, and food use.
PubMed ID
7588487 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

Knowledge and attitudes of Vancouver residents toward food additives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244976
Source
Can J Public Health. 1981 Jan-Feb;72(1):49-54
Publication Type
Article

The fatty acid composition of Northern-Canadian marine and terrestrial mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236153
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(2):105-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
S M Innis
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(2):105-9
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Dietary Fats - analysis
Fatty Acids - analysis
Food Habits
Humans
Inuits
Meat - analysis
Pinnipedia
Reindeer
Whales
Abstract
The low mortality from cardiovascular disease in Greenland Eskimos has been attributed to their consumption of diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids are found in fish and marine mammal lipids. Whereas the fatty acid composition of several fish species has been documented, information is more limited on the mammals which feature significantly in the diets of many Arctic populations. This study investigated the fatty acid composition of commonly eaten marine mammals, as well as the polar bear and caribou. The tissue fatty acid composition was species-dependent, probably reflecting to some degree differences in feeding habits. The marine mammals and the amphibious polar bear, but not the caribou, contained substantial quantities of long chain omega-3 fatty acids. These studies further document the transfer of omega-3 fatty acids through the food chain to man and suggest that marine mammal and polar bear lipids are significant sources of omega-3 fatty acids.
PubMed ID
2890267 View in PubMed
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Food bank users: sociodemographic and nutritional characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205620
Source
CMAJ. 1998 May 5;158(9):1143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-1998
Author
L J Starkey
H V Kuhnlein
K. Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Que. STARKEY@AGRADM.LAN.MCGILL.CA
Source
CMAJ. 1998 May 5;158(9):1143-9
Date
May-5-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Demography
Female
Food Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Food Supply
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Social Class
Urban Population
Abstract
The continued expansion of food assistance programs makes it important to examine the sociodemographic characteristics and nutritional profiles of people relying on this service. The authors undertook such a study in a large urban centre.
A total of 490 food bank users were randomly selected from a stratified random sample of 57 urban food banks in Montreal. A questionnaire and a dietary recall interview were given by a dietitian-interviewer to determine socioeconomic, demographic and cultural characteristics and macronutrient intake. These data were compared with national and provincial data.
The mean age of the participants (256 men and 234 women) was 41 years; 204 (41.6%) were living alone and most (409 [83.5%]) were receiving social assistance benefits. These food bank users were well educated (190 [38.8%] had completed technical school or had a college or university education), and the sample included few elderly or disabled people. The median body mass index was greater than 24, which indicated that energy intake, although below recommended levels, was not a chronic problem. The people using the food banks had a monthly shortfall in their food budget of between $43 and $46.
Food banks are used regularly, primarily by young healthy adults. They are though of as a necessary community resource.
Notes
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Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Sep 15;137(6):485-903308037
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Cites: JAMA. 1989 Oct 13;262(14):1973-92778933
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1989 Sep-Oct;104(5):451-72508173
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 1989 Sep-Oct;39(5):266-882513099
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Cites: J Nutr. 1990 Nov;120 Suppl 11:1538-432243302
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Jul;81(7):911-42053672
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Jan 18;304(6820):165-81637372
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Apr;82(4):600-21546786
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Jun;82(6):816-201585961
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Feb 26;343(8896):4967906754
Cites: J Nutr. 1994 Sep;124(9 Suppl):1878S-1885S8089765
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Oct 22;344(8930):1120-47934494
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1994 Sep-Oct;85(5):351-67804943
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 1995 Feb;14(1):37-457706608
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1995 Jul;85(7):903-57604907
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Jan 15;134(2):127-323484656
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1986 Dec;86(12):1684-933782684
PubMed ID
9597965 View in PubMed
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Dietary nutrient profiles of Canadian Baffin Island Inuit differ by food source, season, and age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4550
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
H V Kuhnlein
R. Soueida
O. Receveur
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-62
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Supply
Humans
Interviews
Inuits
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of food source (traditional or market), season (six seasons), and age (five age groups) on dietary nutrient patterns of Inuit living in Baffin Island, Canada. DESIGN: Twenty-four-hour recall interviews of all residents who had lived > or = 3 years in this one community in each of six seasons. Foods that were recalled were divided by source. SETTING/SUBJECTS: The study took place in the Inuit community of Qikiqtarjuaq, which harvests the highest quantity of wildlife per capita of all Baffin communities. Three hundred sixty-six residents contributed a total of 1,410 recalls: 401 from nonpregnant, nonlactating adult women, 74 from pregnant women, 301 from adult men, 451 from children aged 3 to 12 years, and 183 from teenagers aged 13 to 19 years. Participation was voluntary and averaged 65% to 75% of residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Energy, total dry weight of food, and dietary nutrients (ie, carbohydrate, protein, total fat, saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, vitamin A, iron, copper, zinc, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and sodium) were measured by food source, season, and age. Nutrient density (nutrient per 1,000 kcal) was calculated in traditional and market food sources. Selected nutrients were computed in total diets, and compared with Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Tests for normality of the distribution of nutrient intakes (ie, Shapiro-Wilk statistic) were performed followed by nonparametric analyses (ie, Wilcoxon paired-sample t test, Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance, and adjustment for Bonferroni inequalities resulting from multiple comparisons). RESULTS: Most nutrient intakes were significantly different by food source (P
PubMed ID
8557942 View in PubMed
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Arctic indigenous peoples experience the nutrition transition with changing dietary patterns and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4764
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
H V Kuhnlein
O. Receveur
R. Soueida
G M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Canada. harriet.kuhnlein@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Population Groups
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Indigenous Peoples globally are part of the nutrition transition. They may be among the most extreme for the extent of dietary change experienced in the last few decades. In this paper, we report survey data from 44 representative communities from 3 large cultural areas of the Canadian Arctic: the Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis, and Inuit communities. Dietary change was represented in 2 ways: 1) considering the current proportion of traditional food (TF) in contrast to the precontact period (100% TF); and 2) the amount of TF consumed by older vs. younger generations. Total diet, TF, and BMI data from adults were investigated. On days when TF was consumed, there was significantly less (P 40 y old consistently consumed more (P or = 30 kg/m(2)) of Arctic adults exceeded all-Canadian rates. Measures to improve nutrient-dense market food (MF) availability and use are called for, as are ways to maintain or increase TF use.
PubMed ID
15173410 View in PubMed
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Population exposure to radioactivity from consumption of caribou among the Dene/Metis of Denendeh (western Northwest Territories, Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4857
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Apr-Jun;8(2):145-58
Publication Type
Article
Author
P R Berti
H M Chan
O. Receveur
C R MacDonald
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Apr-Jun;8(2):145-58
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Animals
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Reindeer
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
There has been long-standing concern with exposure to radioactivity through the consumption of caribou, particularly in indigenous populations in the western Northwest Territories, Canada, who are traditionally high consumers. We conducted a dietary survey in this region in 1994 to estimate population exposure levels. Dietary information was collected from 1012 individuals in sixteen communities (1012 days of 24-hour dietary recalls, 1012 food frequency questionnaires) and radionuclide levels in caribou flesh, liver and kidneys were measured. Monte Carlo statistical methods were employed to integrate these data sets and estimate the distribution of radiation exposure for people in five regions (Gwich'in, Saht�??�?�º, Dogrib, Deh-Cho, South Slave). The exposure levels were highest in the South Slave region and in older males (40+ years), and lowest in the Gwich'in region and in younger females (20-40 years). Median exposure level ranged from 0.95 to 5.31 mSv per year (mean of medians = 2.96 mSv/y). In each group the 95th percentile of exposure was 2-3 times greater than the median. These exposure levels are comparable to exposure levels in Alaskan Eskimos and Marshall Island residents, and are much higher than European or American urban populations. Caribou meat is a very nutritious food. We conclude that, although there is some radiation exposure from consuming caribou, the associated health risks are low and are outweighed by the physical, social and cultural benefits derived from hunting and eating caribou.
PubMed ID
9577747 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to chemical contaminants from traditional food among adult Dene/Metis in the western Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4860
Source
Environ Res. 1998 Feb;76(2):131-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
P R Berti
O. Receveur
H M Chan
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, Quebec, Canada. berti@agradm.lan.mcgill.ca
Source
Environ Res. 1998 Feb;76(2):131-42
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chlorine Compounds - analysis
Cultural Characteristics
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Environmental contaminants such as organochlorines and heavy metals have been reported to bioaccumulate in Arctic and subarctic wildlife. The Indigenous Peoples in northern and Arctic Canada rely on local wildlife as an important food source, and it is thus hypothesized that they may have high intakes of these contaminants. Herein, an assessment of dietary exposure to selected organochlorines and heavy metals for Indigenous Peoples of the western Northwest Territories (NWT) is presented. Dietary data were collected from 1012 adults with 24-h recalls in 16 communities in the western NWT (Denendeh). A comprehensive survey of the literature, as well as in-house analysis, formed the basis of a large traditional food-contaminant database. By combining the dietary and contaminant data, dietary exposure to 11 chemical contaminants was calculated. Dietary exposure to chemical contaminants in Denendeh is generally low and there is little, if any, associated health risk. However there are specific contaminants in certain communities for which exposure on a single day approaches the tolerable daily intake levels. These situations are detailed and monitoring needs are described.
PubMed ID
9515068 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.