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51749 records – page 1 of 5175.

[Occurrence of metacerkariae Diplostomum sp. in the Siberian turgeon fry (Acipenser baeri Brandt)--preliminary study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81221
Source
Wiad Parazytol. 1999;45(3):347-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
Dzika E.
Bielecki A.
Kolman H.
Kolman R.
Author Affiliation
Uniwersytet Warminsko-Mazurski, Katedra Parazytologii, 10-561 Olsztyn.
Source
Wiad Parazytol. 1999;45(3):347-53
Date
1999
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Fishes - classification - parasitology
Fresh Water - parasitology
Life Cycle Stages
Prevalence
Trematoda - isolation & purification
Trematode Infections - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Abstract
Siberian sturgeon fry coming from three different ponds has been examined. 1. "Dgal" - fish culture conerete-terrestrial pond beloning to D.O.Z. Dgal Inland Fisheries Institute in Olsztyn supplied with fresh water from Great Dgal Lake; 2. "Grzmieca" - fish culture pond terrestrial, natural belonging to fishing farm Grzmieca near Brodnica; 3. "Konin" - fish culture pond near Konin supplied with water utilized by near heat and power generating plant. Total of 80 sturgeons fry with parameters: length 17.5 cm - 38.5 cm, weight 21 g - 134 g, age 0+1+ has been examined. The examinated group of sturgenos had metacercariae Diplostomum sp. in their lenses. Prevalence of infection of sturgeon with metacercariae Diplostomum sp. was high in all this three ponds. Intensity of infection was also high in ponds "Dgal" and "Grzmieca", but low in "Konin". In ponds "Dgal" and "Konin" we have obtained high positive correlation ("Dgal" - r = 0,606, p
PubMed ID
16886375 View in PubMed
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Reconstructive surgery for treatment of urogenital tuberculosis: 30 years of observation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208308
Source
World J Surg. 1997 Jun;21(5):511-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
T P Mochalova
I Y Starikov
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Russian Research Institute of Phtisiopulmonology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
World J Surg. 1997 Jun;21(5):511-5
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anastomosis, Surgical - adverse effects - mortality
Colon - transplantation
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculosis, Urogenital - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Abstract
Tuberculosis has continued to be a public health problem around the world. The urogenital tuberculosis clinic in the Russian Scientific Research Institute of Phthisiopulmonology was founded in 1950. The development of reconstruction operations for those with urogenital tuberculosis began in 1960. Since then 4298 patients with urogenital tuberculosis have been treated, and 2364 operations have been performed: 885 to remove an organ, 531 to preserve an organ, and 948 for reconstruction. The cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in recent years have increased to 6.0%. Surgery for urogenital tuberculosis is performed after specific medical therapy has been tried, but it is difficult, particularly if it is a reconstruction. The clinical features and results of various ureteral neoimplantation procedures using intestinal transplants (ileocystoplasty, sigmoidocystoplasty, cecocystoplasty) are discussed.
PubMed ID
9204739 View in PubMed
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Source
World J Surg. 1997 Jun;21(5):457-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
M I Perelman
V P Strelzov
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, Moscow Medical Academy, Russian Institute for Phthisiopulmonology, Russia.
Source
World J Surg. 1997 Jun;21(5):457-67
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects
Prognosis
Registries
Reoperation
Russia
Survival Rate
Thoracic Surgery - classification - methods
Thoracotomy - methods
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Abstract
During the period 1990-1994 a total of 578 operations were performed in 502 patients with various forms of tuberculosis. Most of the patients (68%) were men aged 20 to 50 years (70%). Sputum cultures were positive in 55% of the patients. More than half of all patients were chronic smokers, and about 10% were alcoholics or drug addicts. There were no human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and none with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The most frequent surgical interventions were, according to the classification adopted in Russia, for cavernous or fibrocavernous tuberculosis (196 cases) and tuberculomas (161 cases). The main operative procedures used were pulmonary resection (n = 280) and pneumonectomy or pleuropneumonectomy (n = 80). Diseased intrathoracic lymph nodes were ablated in 62 patients. Thoracoplasty or thoracomyoplasty were performed in 46 cases, thoracostomy in 37, closure of a thoracic wall defect in 27, and reamputation of the main bronchial stump in 6. Postoperative complications arose in 20% of the patients. More than half occurred in the pleural cavity or bronchi and were associated with tuberculous infection. The postoperative hospital case-fatality rate was 2%. The overall clinical efficacy by the time of discharge was 82.7% (95% in tuberculomas). Reactivation of tuberculosis over the first 3 years after discharge occurred in 6.6% of the patients. Most patients with large or multiple caverns, tuberculomas, intrathoracic caseous lymphadenitis, or various complications of pulmonary tuberculosis cannot be cured (or are not amenable to care in principle) by means of antibacterial therapy because of irreversible morphologic changes in the lungs, bronchi, pleura, lymph nodes, or thoracic wall. For this reason, indications for surgical management of pulmonary tuberculosis should be generally expanded. Excessively long antibacterial therapy for tuberculosis is often inadvisable. Although the availability of standardized regimens of antibacterial therapy is strategically essential, each patient must be treated according to an individual plan. In certain cases thoracic surgeons should be enlisted to participate in the development of such plans.
PubMed ID
9204731 View in PubMed
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Enhancing client competence: melding professional and client knowledge in public health nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208310
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1997 Jun;14(3):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
L. Reutter
J S Ford
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1997 Jun;14(3):143-50
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Feedback
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Public Health Nursing - methods
Abstract
Providing health information is an important aspect of public health nursing. This article describes how public health nurses (PHNs) give information to enhance client competence. The findings are part of a larger study that explored PHNs perspectives and experiences of their practice. The study employed an exploratory descriptive qualitative research design. Data were gathered through in-depth individual and focus group interviews with 28 PHNs in Alberta, Canada. Content analysis revealed that nurses work to enhance client competence by sharing professional knowledge and by building on the client's experiential knowledge. Nurses provide information to assist clients with immediate concerns and for future use, PHNs use three main strategies to deal with immediate concerns: being direct, providing options, and presenting a different view. Information for future use focused on enhancing development and forestalling future problems. Nurses build on clients' experiential knowledge by acknowledging their present situation, giving positive feedback, being there, and gently persuading. The authors suggest that the melding of professional and client knowledge is foundational to health promotion approaches that enhance client competence. There is a need for further research that explores the intricacies of developing partnerships between professionals and clients that embrace a sharing of professional and experiential knowledge.
PubMed ID
9203838 View in PubMed
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The future of informed consent and patient-dentist communication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208311
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1997 Jun;63(6):460-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P E Graham
M. Harel-Raviv
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1997 Jun;63(6):460-3
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Dental Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Dentist-Patient Relations
Forecasting
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Education as Topic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9203780 View in PubMed
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Opportunity awaits for new and established dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208312
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1997 Jun;63(6):421-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997

Comparison of health and functional ability between noninstitutionalized and least dependent institutionalized elderly in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208313
Source
Gerontologist. 1997 Jun;37(3):374-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Noro
S. Aro
Author Affiliation
National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES), Health Services Research Unit, Helsinki, Finland. anja.noro@stakes.fi
Source
Gerontologist. 1997 Jun;37(3):374-83
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Finland
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Policy
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Institutionalization
Long-Term Care
Male
Social Environment
Abstract
Finland's active deinstitutionalization policy aims to reduce the number of elderly people in long-term residential care and to keep noninstitutionalized elderly people living at home as long as possible. As a contribution to the issue of the appropriateness of long-term institutional care, we compared the health and functional ability of elderly people living at home or in residential care to assess the theoretical possibility of discharging the least dependent elderly from residential homes. Findings from two separate data sets collected in 1992 were compared; one (n = 475) was obtained by computer-assisted telephone interview (elderly at home) and the other (n = 459) by postal survey (elderly in residential care). The direct method was used in age and gender standardization, and logistic regression analysis was applied. Elderly people living at home were found to be in better health and with better functional ability than those in residential care. However, a proportion of home-dwellers needing some help with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) assessed their health as being even worse than those in care, and approximated that of institutionalized elderly judged by the personnel to be able to manage with home-based care. Compared with home-dwellers, those assessed as able to manage in-home care were mostly single and had less education and more restrictions in their Instrumental ADLs and medication. Our results indicate that one third of those assessed as able to manage in-home care could possibly be discharged if adequate servicers and housing were available.
PubMed ID
9203761 View in PubMed
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Variations in living donor graft rates by dialysis clinic: effect on outcome and cost of chronic renal failure therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208314
Source
Clin Nephrol. 1997 Jun;47(6):351-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
M A Baltzan
S. Ahmed
R B Baltzan
R P Marshall
E L Thoma
M F Nicol
Author Affiliation
Baltzan Clinic, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Clin Nephrol. 1997 Jun;47(6):351-5
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Cadaver
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Graft Survival
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - economics - mortality - therapy
Kidney Transplantation - economics - statistics & numerical data
Living Donors - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - economics - statistics & numerical data
Renal Dialysis - economics
Saskatchewan
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Examination of nephrology practice variations in living donor renal grafts to determine their influence on organ supply, quality, and cost of chronic renal failure therapy.
Saskatchewan chronic dialysis, cadaveric, and living donor renal grafts in 1983-1994 inclusive.
Saskatchewan has three dialysis (I, II, III) and one transplant clinic. In the period the renal graft incidences/million population by these dialysis clinics by organ source were; Cadaveric: 23.1, 23.2, 21.1 (p = ns). Living: 5.4, 21.7, 8.3 (I or III vs II p
PubMed ID
9202863 View in PubMed
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Does a computerized price comparison module reduce prescribing costs in general practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208315
Source
Fam Pract. 1997 Jun;14(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P. Vedsted
J N Nielsen
F. Olesen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Fam Pract. 1997 Jun;14(3):199-203
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Consumer Satisfaction
Cost Control - methods
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Denmark
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intervention Studies
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Prescription Fees - trends
Abstract
We aimed to assess the trends in prescribed defined daily doses (DDD) and drug expenses before and after the introduction of a computerized cost containment module into the computer record system of a defined group of GPs. The GPs' expectations for and experiences with the module were examined.
We performed a controlled follow-up study on antecedent data before and after intervention. A questionnaire was administered to the intervention group at the introduction and 1 year later. Data on prescribing were collected in the database of the Health Insurance Aarhus County, as a normal routine for accounting. The GPs were not aware of the ongoing cost supervision study. Additional cost information software was introduced on 1 January 1993 to 20 practices with 28 GPs. The software assisted the GPs in a semiautomatic way to identify and prescribe the cheapest drugs. The subjects comprised 158 practices including 231 GPs in Aarhus County, Denmark. Questionnaires were sent to the 20 intervention practices. The main outcome measures were prescribed DDD, reimbursement for prescribed drugs, and reimbursement per prescribed DDD quarterly during 1992 and 1993.
Compared with the controls there were no changes in prescribed DDD, reimbursement for prescribed drugs, and reimbursement per prescribed DDD in the intervention group after the introduction of the module.
Simply giving a random group of GPs computer assistance to choose less expensive drugs did not reduce expenditure per DDD. Cost containment procedures should be more intensive than just giving the doctors a computer-assisted decision aid.
PubMed ID
9201492 View in PubMed
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A faculty-development needs assessment at one medical school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208316
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Jun;72(6):558-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P J McLeod
Y. Steinert
L. Conochie
L. Nasmith
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Jun;72(6):558-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Demography
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration
Humans
Learning
Medical Informatics
Quebec
Research - education
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Staff Development
Teaching
PubMed ID
9200595 View in PubMed
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51749 records – page 1 of 5175.