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24626 records – page 1 of 2463.

Objectively recorded physical activity and the association with gestational diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264492
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):e389-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
K. Mørkrid
A K Jenum
S. Berntsen
L. Sletner
K R Richardsen
S. Vangen
I. Holme
K I Birkeland
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):e389-97
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adult
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this population-based study was to assess the association between objectively recorded physical activity (PA) in early gestation and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identified at 28 weeks of gestation in a multi-ethnic cohort of healthy pregnant women in Oslo, Norway. In total, 759 women were included. In early gestation (
PubMed ID
24894027 View in PubMed
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Risk factors, clinical course and long-term prognosis in hidradenitis suppurativa: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264497
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2014 Oct;171(4):819-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
C B Kromann
I E Deckers
S. Esmann
J. Boer
E P Prens
G B E Jemec
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2014 Oct;171(4):819-24
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hidradenitis Suppurativa - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Abstract
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) causes considerable morbidity. The long-term prognosis is of obvious interest to both patients and physicians. We conducted this study to determine the prognosis and risk factors in patients diagnosed with HS.
To describe the long-term prognosis and the clinical course of HS and its association to known risk factors.
A postal follow-up survey with uncomplicated factual questions was conducted. As all of the patients were well acquainted with their long-standing disease, this was thought to be sufficient for meaningful results. All cases were diagnosed by a dermatologist. Overall, 212 patients diagnosed with HS between 1981 and 2001 were studied after a median follow-up period of 22 years (range 12-32).
The overall response rate was 71.2%, with 60.8% (129/212) valid (fully completed) questionnaires. Remission was reported by 39.4% (50/127) and improvement by 31.5% (40/127). Unchanged severity was reported by 20.5% (26/127), and 8.7% (11/127) experienced worsening disease. Tobacco smoking was reported by 92.2% (119/129). Among nonsmokers, 40% (35/88) reported remission vs. 29% (17/59) of active smokers. A higher proportion of nonobese patients (45%) reported remission than obese patients (23%).
We found that 39.4% of the sample reported remission of HS. Suspected risk factors appeared to influence the prognosis. Smoking and obesity were significantly linked to a lower rate of self-reported remission. The notion that lifestyle factors play a role in HS appears to be supported by this survey.
PubMed ID
24804604 View in PubMed
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Self-reported social anxiety symptoms and correlates in a clinical (CAP) and a community (Young-HUNT) adolescent sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264498
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;49(12):1937-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Ingunn Ranøyen
Thomas Jozefiak
Jan Wallander
Stian Lydersen
Marit S Indredavik
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;49(12):1937-49
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Self Report
Abstract
The frequencies of social anxiety symptoms in a mental health clinical and a community sample of adolescents are compared. Also, we explore if adolescents can be classified in subgroups based on social anxiety symptoms. Associations between social anxiety symptoms and coexisting problems and sociodemographic characteristics are examined.
Adolescent participants, aged 13-18, in two large Norwegian studies, consisting of a clinical (n = 694, 42.1% participation rate, 55% girls, mean age = 15.6) and a community (n = 7,694, 73.1% participation rate, 51% girls, mean age = 15.8) sample completed identical self-report questionnaires measuring social anxiety and related variables.
Median sum scores (interquartile range) of social anxiety symptoms were higher among girls than boys and in the clinical [girls = 16 (12-22); boys = 12 (9-16)] compared to the community sample [girls = 12 (9-15); boys = 10 (7-12)] (p
PubMed ID
24791658 View in PubMed
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Insomnia symptoms and subsequent psychotropic medication: a register-linked study with 5-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264503
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;49(12):1993-2002
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Peija Haaramo
Tea Lallukka
Eero Lahelma
Christer Hublin
Ossi Rahkonen
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;49(12):1993-2002
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Registries
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - psychology
Abstract
This study examined the associations of insomnia symptoms with subsequent psychotropic medication, reflecting mental health.
Postal baseline surveys among 40- to 60-year-old employees of the city of Helsinki, Finland, were collected in 2000-2002 (N = 6,227, response rate 67%, 78% women) and longitudinally linked with national register data on prescribed reimbursed medication. Insomnia symptoms at baseline comprised difficulties in initiating and maintaining sleep, and non-restorative sleep. All purchased psychotropic medication 5-7 years prior to and 5 years after baseline was included. Outcomes were any psychotropic medication; antidepressants; and anxiolytics, hypnotics, and sedatives. Covariates included socio-demographic and work-related factors, health behaviors, lifetime mental disorders, and prior psychotropic medication. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Insomnia symptoms were associated with higher frequency of subsequent psychotropic medication prescriptions. The associations were strongest for frequent insomnia symptoms (women OR 3.55, 95% CI 2.64-4.77; men OR 4.64, 95% CI 2.49-8.66, adjusted for age and prior medication), but also rare and occasional symptoms were associated with psychotropic medication. Further adjustments had negligible effects.
Insomnia symptoms were associated with prescribed psychotropic medication during follow-up in a dose-response manner. Attention should be given to the prevention of insomnia symptoms to curb subsequent mental problems.
PubMed ID
24643300 View in PubMed
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Psychological resources are associated with reduced incidence of coronary heart disease. An 8-year follow-up of a community-based Swedish sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264510
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2015 Feb;22(1):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Oskar Lundgren
Peter Garvin
Lena Jonasson
Gerhard Andersson
Margareta Kristenson
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2015 Feb;22(1):77-84
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hostility
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A large number of studies have provided clear evidence for a link between the risk of coronary heart disease and psychological risk factors. Much less attention has been given to the potential protective effect of psychological resources.
The major aim of this study was to investigate the independent association between psychological resources and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in an 8-year follow-up study of a Swedish community-based cohort.
The cohort consisted of 484 men and 497 women, aged 45-69?years at baseline. The incidence of first-time major event of CHD was analysed in relation to baseline levels of psychological resources, including mastery, self-esteem, and sense of coherence as well as psychological risk factors including cynicism and hostile affect, vital exhaustion, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. In Cox proportional hazard models, adjustments were made for age, sex, eight traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and depressive symptoms.
A total of 56 CHD events had occurred after the 8-year follow-up. After adjustment for age, sex, and eight traditional risk factors, a significantly decreased risk of CHD was found for mastery (HR 0.62 per SD, p?=?0.003), self-esteem (HR 0.64, p?=?0.004), and sense of coherence (HR 0.70, p?=?0.031). An increased risk of CHD was found for vital exhaustion (HR 1.46, p?=?0.014), hopelessness (HR 1.59, p?=?0.003), and depressive symptoms (HR 1.45, p?=?0.009). After further adjustment for depressive symptoms, significant associations remained for mastery (HR 0.67, p?=?0.034), self-esteem (HR 0.69, p?=?0.048), and hopelessness (HR 1.48, p?=?0.023).
The psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem, showed robust protective effects on CHD, also after adjustment for established risk factors as well as depressive symptoms. In parallel, hopelessness was an independent risk factor for CHD. The results may have implications for novel approaches in preventive efforts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24430130 View in PubMed
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High aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction later in life: a nationwide cohort study in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264511
Source
Eur Heart J. 2014 Nov 21;35(44):3133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2014
Author
Gabriel Högström
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Source
Eur Heart J. 2014 Nov 21;35(44):3133-40
Date
Nov-21-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - physiopathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and signs of atherosclerosis are present in all large arteries already in adolescence. We investigated the association between high physical fitness in late adolescence and myocardial infarction (MI) later in life.
The study cohort comprised 743 498 Swedish men examined at the age of 18 years during conscription 1969-84. Aerobic fitness (Wmax) and muscle strength at conscription were measured using standardized methods. Myocardial infarctions occurring in the cohort were tracked through national registers. During a median follow-up period of 34 years, 11 526 MIs were registered in the cohort. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), diseases, education, blood pressure, and socio-economic factors, one standard deviation increase in the level of physical fitness (Wmax) was associated with an 18% decreased risk of later MI [hazard ratio (HR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-0.85]. The beneficial effects of Wmax were significant across all recognized BMI groups, ranging from lean (BMI 30) (P 30) in the highest fourth of Wmax had a higher risk of MI than did lean men (BMI
PubMed ID
24398666 View in PubMed
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Qualitative evaluation of a colorectal cancer education CD-ROM for Community Health Aides/practitioners in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264514
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Dec;29(4):613-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Melany Cueva
Mark Dignan
Anne Lanier
Regina Kuhnley
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Dec;29(4):613-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
CD-ROM
Clinical Competence
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Community Health Services - manpower
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Follow-Up Studies
General Practitioners - education
Humans
Learning
Male
Medical Oncology - education
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important contributor to the cancer burden among Alaska Native people. CRC is the leading incident cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality among Alaska Native people. Completing recommended CRC screening procedures has the potential to reduce both CRC incidence and mortality. "Taking Action Colorectal Health," a multidimensional audiovisual, interactive CD-ROM, incorporates adult education learning principles to provide Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners with timely, medically accurate, and culturally relevant CRC place-based education. Providing this resource on CD-ROM empowers learning within communities and places where people live or choose to learn. The dynamic process of developing, implementing, and evaluating this CRC CD-ROM was informed by a sociocultural approach to share health messages. Within this approach, cultural values, beliefs, and behaviors are affirmed as a place of wisdom and resilience and built upon to provide context and meaning for health messaging. Alaska Native values that honor family, relationships, the land, storytelling, and humor were included in CD-ROM content. Between January and May 2012, 20 interviews were conducted with individuals who had used the CD-ROM. Four categorical themes emerged from analysis of interview transcripts: likeability, utilization, helpfulness, and behavior change. As a result of self-paced learning through stories, movies, and interactive games, respondents reported healthy behavior changes they were making for themselves, with their families and in their patient care practices. This CD-ROM is a culturally based practical course that increased knowledge and activities around colorectal cancer screening by Community Health Aides/Practitioners in Alaska.
PubMed ID
24271842 View in PubMed
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[Prognostic value of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and target organ damages for the occurrence of resistant hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264546
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(4):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A Iu Lazutkina
V V Gorbunov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(4):19-23
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the prognostic value of risk factors for cardiovascular events and target organ damages tor the occurrence of resistant hypertension (RH).
The 2008-2013 survey covered 7959 members of locomotive crews of the Transbaikal Railway whose medical expert examination revealed risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and target organ damages.
During the survey, a group of 7959 people with final outcomes included 21 RH cases to be statistically analyzed. Atherosclerotic plaques in the carotids arteries, proteinuria, creatininemia, overweight, left ventricular hypertrophy, a family history of early cardiovascular diseases, and stress were the major predictors of RH.
The association of the established predictors must be considered in the treatment of patients with RH.
PubMed ID
26087629 View in PubMed
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[FLIGHT CERTIFICATION OF CIVILIAN PILOTS FOLLOWING SURGERY OF BRACHIOCEPHALIC ATHEROSCLEROTIC STENOSES].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264548
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2015;49(2):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
G N Biryukbaeva
A G Bystrova
Kuzmina A Yu
B G Potievskiy
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2015;49(2):44-9
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine - methods
Angiography
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - diagnosis - rehabilitation - surgery
Atherosclerosis - diagnosis - rehabilitation - surgery
Aviation - legislation & jurisprudence
Brachiocephalic Trunk
Certification
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Period
Russia
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Vascular Surgical Procedures - rehabilitation
Abstract
The paper presents cases of surgery of brachiocephalic atherosclerotic lesions with asymptomatic stenosis in civilian pilots reviewed by a Flight Certification Board. Cerebrovascular diseases varying in their clinical presentation (syncopes, transitory ischemic attacks or strokes) may culminate in acute conditions and, consequently, threaten flight safety. There is an exigent need of law-guided regulations for flight certification boards on how to manage cases of pilots with a history of cerebrovascular disease.
PubMed ID
26087586 View in PubMed
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[Plaque radiotherapy for anterior uveal melanomas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264554
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2015 Mar-Apr;131(2):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Saakyan
A G Amiryan
V V Valskiy
I S Mironova
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2015 Mar-Apr;131(2):5-11
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brachytherapy - methods
Cataract - diagnosis - etiology
Ciliary Body - pathology
Corneal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Eye Enucleation - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iris - pathology
Male
Melanoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Middle Aged
Moscow
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Uveal Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Visual acuity
Abstract
To determine the effectiveness of plaque radiation therapy for anterior uveal melanomas and to evaluate the risk and frequency of complications at different time intervals after the treatment.
During 2010-2013 a total of 30 patients (10 male, 20 female) aged 11-73 (50 years on the average) with iris or iridociliary melanomas were treated with Ru-106 and Sr-90 ophthalmic plaques. In 8 patients the brachytherapy was preceded by local tumor excision. Morphological diagnosis was verified in 10 patients (8 iridectomies, 2 enucleations), of them 8 cases turned out to be spindle cell melanomas and the other 2--mixed cell melanomas. Follow-up period ranged from 1 to 54 months with the median of 13,5 months.
Tumor regression was achieved in all cases. Enucleation had to be performed in 2 patients due to cornea and sclera necrosis. In the early post-brachytherapy period (up to 1 month) the most frequent radiation-related complications were keratopathy and uveitis (8 and 6 patients correspondingly). In patients observed for up to 3 months (28 patients) these were keratopathy and cataract (8 and 5 patients correspondingly). In the long-term (over 6 months) cataract predominated (17 patients). At the end of the study all patients were alive. Metastatic disease was diagnosed in one patient 30 months after the treatment.
The results of the present clinical study confirm the effectiveness of brachytherapy for iris and iridociliary melanomas, which implies that tumor is well locally controlled and radiation-related complications are moderate and curable. This method of local tumor destruction can be another alternative to enucleation in cases when local tumor excision cannot be performed.
PubMed ID
26080576 View in PubMed
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24626 records – page 1 of 2463.