Skip header and navigation

Refine By

  • All Records

299580 records – page 1 of 29958.

Renal preservation in children with neurogenic bladder-sphincter dysfunction followed in a national program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136128
Source
J Pediatr Urol. 2012 Apr;8(2):187-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Peter Wide
Gunilla Glad Mattsson
Sven Mattsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Linköping University, SE 581 85 Linköping, Sweden. peter.wide@lio.se
Source
J Pediatr Urol. 2012 Apr;8(2):187-93
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
National Health Programs
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Dysraphism - complications - diagnosis
Sweden
Urinary Bladder - physiopathology
Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Urinary Catheterization - methods
Urodynamics - physiology
Abstract
Neurogenic bladder-sphincter dysfunction (NBSD) constitutes the major reason for morbidity in children with spina bifida. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for renal damage in children with NBSD followed according to the Swedish national guidelines.
Records and cystometries from 6 to 16 years (median 11) follow up of 41 consecutive children born 1993-2003 with NBSD were evaluated. The children were divided into a high pressure group (baseline pressure above 30 cmH(2)O at maximal clean intermittent catheterization volume in at least two cystometries) and a low pressure group. Most children (34/41) were followed from birth.
Although renal scarring on DMSA-scintigraphy was found in 5/41 children, all but one had normal renal function. Two already had renal scars on entering the follow-up program at age 2.5 and 3 years. Renal scarring was more frequent in the high pressure group (P
PubMed ID
21411372 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decisions to update comparative drug effectiveness reviews vary based on type of new evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136129
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Sep;64(9):977-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kim Peterson
Marian S McDonagh
Rongwei Fu
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR 97217, USA.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Sep;64(9):977-84
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Comparative Effectiveness Research - statistics & numerical data
Decision Support Techniques
Drug Evaluation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Policy
Humans
International Cooperation
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
MEDLINE
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Psychiatry
Publishing
Review Literature as Topic
United States
Abstract
To determine the time to and key factors associated with decision to update comparative effectiveness of reviews of drugs based on periodic scans of new evidence.
Based on periodic scans of new evidence, we analyzed 69 decisions on whether to update for 41 comparative effectiveness reviews conducted for the Drug Effectiveness Review Project. We used the Kaplan-Meier product limit method to estimate mean time to update and generalized estimating equation logistic regression to estimate associations between updating decisions and review topic or characteristics of new evidence.
Mean time to update was 24.9 months. Significant predictors of a decision to update were identification of a new drug (odds ratio [OR]: 5.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.68-19.44) and the number of new relevant trials (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.10). Compared with nonpsychiatric topics, psychiatric topics were most rapidly developing (mean new relevant citations: 38.4 vs. 8.2; P=0.0127) and were updated at a faster pace (mean survival time: 10.2 vs. 27.5 months; P
PubMed ID
21411283 View in PubMed
Less detail

The AUSCAN subscales, AIMS-2 hand/finger subscale, and FIOHA were not unidimensional scales.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136130
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Sep;64(9):1039-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Ida Kristin Haugen
Rikke Helene Moe
Barbara Slatkowsky-Christensen
Tore Kristian Kvien
Désirée van der Heijde
Andrew Garratt
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, PO Box 23 Vinderen, 0319 Oslo, Norway. ida.haugen@diakonsyk.no
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Sep;64(9):1039-46
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hand - physiopathology
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway
Osteoarthritis - physiopathology
Pain - physiopathology
Pain Measurement - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Evaluate the internal construct validity of the Australian/Canadian (AUSCAN) index for hand osteoarthritis (HOA) and identify the physical function instrument with best performance.
AUSCAN, AIMS-2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale 2), and Functional Index of HOA (FIHOA) were self-completed by 209 HOA patients (mean [standard deviation] age 61.6 [5.7] years) at baseline and 128 at follow-up. Rasch analysis was performed.
AUSCAN pain, physical function, and stiffness subscales comprised three constructs. AUSCAN scale performance was improved after removal of "Pain at rest" from the pain scale and division of physical function into two scales of high precision and grip strength tasks. AIMS-2 hand/finger subscale and FIHOA were improved after removal of one and two items, respectively and collapse of two AIMS-2 response categories. AUSCAN physical function scale showed better targeting to the sample and higher person reliability compared with FIHOA and especially AIMS-2 because of less "severe" items concerning grip strength tasks as opposed to precision tasks.
The AUSCAN subscales, AIMS-2 hand/finger scale, and FIHOA were not unidimensional. However, deletion of misfitting items improved scale performance. The revised AUSCAN physical function and FIHOA scales are preferable for measurement of grip strength and precision tasks, respectively.
PubMed ID
21411282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injuries in children and adolescents--analysis of 41,330 injury related visits to an emergency department in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136131
Source
Injury. 2012 Sep;43(9):1403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Erik M Hedström
Ulrica Bergström
Piotr Michno
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University Hospital, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. erik.hedstrom@orthop.umu.se
Source
Injury. 2012 Sep;43(9):1403-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Poisoning - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
We present an overview of the injuries seen at the emergency department of a regional hospital in northern Sweden and the variations in the injury pattern with age, sex and time.
Data consisting of all injuries sustained by those 0-19 years of age seen at the emergency department of Umeå University Hospital between 1998 and 2008 (41,330 injury events) were analysed with respect to injury type, mechanism, activity, age and sex. Rates were calculated using population data from Statistics Sweden.
The rate of injury related visits to the emergency department was 110/1000 person years. The most common causes of visits to the emergency department were minor injuries such as contusions, abrasions and open wounds. 12% of the injuries resulted in admission to a ward. Variations in type of injury, mechanism and activity at injury were noted, in particular with age, but also with sex. We noted a 31% rate increase of visits to the hospital's emergency department between 1998 and 2008, rate ratio 1.31 (1.27-1.38). There was no significant increase in the rate of injuries resulting in hospitalisation.
Our results give an estimate of the rate of all injuries and subsets of injuries resulting in visits to the only hospital emergency department within a well defined catchment area. It was not possible to determine whether the increased rate of visits to the ED was due to an increase in the actual rate of injuries within the catchment area. The variations seen in different age groups reflect the hazards associated with different periods in growth and the ability to cope with these. The results point to areas where improved preventive measures may be implemented or where further research may be of value.
PubMed ID
21411086 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age, period, and cohort analysis of regular dental care behavior and edentulism: a marginal approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136132
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2011;11:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kar-Yan Li
May Chun Mei Wong
Kwok-Fai Lam
Eli Schwarz
Author Affiliation
Dental Public Health, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, 34 Hospital Road, Hong Kong SAR, China.
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2011;11:9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dental Care - psychology - utilization
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Prevalence
School Dentistry
Sex Factors
Social Class
Space-Time Clustering
Young Adult
Abstract
To analyze the regular dental care behavior and prevalence of edentulism in adult Danes, reported in sequential cross-sectional oral health surveys by the application of a marginal approach to consider the possible clustering effect of birth cohorts.
Data from four sequential cross-sectional surveys of non-institutionalized Danes conducted from 1975-2005 comprising 4330 respondents aged 15+ years in 9 birth cohorts were analyzed. The key study variables were seeking dental care on an annual basis (ADC) and edentulism. For the analysis of ADC, survey year, age, gender, socio-economic status (SES) group, denture-wearing, and school dental care (SDC) during childhood were considered. For the analysis of edentulism, only respondents aged 35+ years were included. Survey year, age, gender, SES group, ADC, and SDC during childhood were considered as the independent factors. To take into account the clustering effect of birth cohorts, marginal logistic regressions with an independent correlation structure in generalized estimating equations (GEE) were carried out, with PROC GENMOD in SAS software.
The overall proportion of people seeking ADC increased from 58.8% in 1975 to 86.7% in 2005, while for respondents aged 35 years or older, the overall prevalence of edentulism (35+ years) decreased from 36.4% in 1975 to 5.0% in 2005. Females, respondents in the higher SES group, in more recent survey years, with no denture, and receiving SDC in all grades during childhood were associated with higher probability of seeking ADC regularly (P
Notes
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1976 Nov;4(6):221-61069611
Cites: J Endod. 2008 Jul;34(7):798-80318570982
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1983 Feb;11(1):18-246572119
Cites: Tandlaegebladet. 1983 Feb;87(3):89-976573034
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1983 Jun;11(3):162-86573998
Cites: Int Dent J. 1983 Sep;33(3):213-206579025
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1983 Dec;73(12):1389-946638234
Cites: Biometrics. 1986 Mar;42(1):121-303719049
Cites: Stat Med. 1987 Jun;6(4):449-673629047
Cites: Stat Med. 1987 Jun;6(4):469-813629048
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Oct;78(10):1315-213421387
Cites: Community Dent Health. 1988 Sep;5(3):255-643264203
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Apr;17(2):102-52522034
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Apr;18(2):66-92335064
Cites: Med Care. 1990 Dec;28(12):1165-802250500
Cites: Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1992;88(1-2):13-231470628
Cites: Clin Oral Implants Res. 2009 Oct;20(10):1170-719719741
Cites: Stat Med. 1992 Oct-Nov;11(14-15):1825-391480876
Cites: Stat Med. 1993 Sep 30;12(18):1723-328248664
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2000 Apr;28(2):102-1110730718
Cites: Br Dent J. 2000 Dec 9;189(11):598-60311132690
Cites: Biometrics. 2001 Mar;57(1):120-511252586
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2001 Jun;109(3):149-5411456343
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;30(5):352-6212236826
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2002 Dec 5;2:1512466027
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2003 Dec;38(6 Pt 2):1843-6214727800
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 2004 Summer;64(3):127-3515341135
Cites: Am Sociol Rev. 1965 Dec;30(6):843-615846306
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 1992;1(3):249-731341660
Cites: Stat Med. 1995 Feb 28;14(4):413-297746980
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-307667665
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Feb;54(1):36-438669239
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;25(1):113-89088700
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;26(1):32-469126501
Cites: J Prosthet Dent. 1998 Jan;79(1):56-99474542
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Apr 1;147(7):694-7039554609
Cites: Stat Med. 1998 Jun 15;17(11):1261-919670414
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jun;52(6):569-8310408997
Cites: J Dent Res. 1999 Oct;78(10):1655-6110520971
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2004 Dec;28(6):549-5415707204
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2005 Apr;33(2):81-9215725170
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2005 Sep;32(9):984-9316104963
Cites: Caries Res. 2007;41(1):16-2517167255
Cites: J Dent Res. 2007 Feb;86(2):131-617251511
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2007 Mar;34(3):226-3117257157
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2007 Jun;115(3):174-917587291
Cites: Aust Dent J. 2007 Jun;52(2):154-617687964
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2007 Dec;24(4):225-3218246840
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;36(2):118-2718333875
Cites: Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2008 May;10(2):93-818462205
Cites: Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2008;5(2):95-10118559022
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1982 Oct;10(5):253-96958409
PubMed ID
21410991 View in PubMed
Less detail

The BTNL2 A allele variant is frequent in Danish patients with sarcoidosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136133
Source
Clin Respir J. 2011 Apr;5(2):105-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Milman N
Svendsen CB
Nielsen FC
Hansen TV
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. nils.mil@dadlnet.dk
Source
Clin Respir J. 2011 Apr;5(2):105-11
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sarcoidosis - genetics
Abstract
The butyrophilin-like 2 (BTNL2) gene is located on chromosome 6p21.3 close to the HLA-class II genes. An association has been reported between sarcoidosis and a single nucleotide polymorphism in BTNL2, rs2076530, also termed the A allele.
To evaluate whether patients with sarcoidosis carry the A allele more frequently than healthy subjects.
The series comprised 87 ethnic Danes with sarcoidosis and 113 healthy control subjects. Analysis of rs2076530 was performed by Taqman assay, polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of genomic DNA.
Sarcoidosis patients had a higher frequency of the A allele than controls (73.9% vs 55.8%) (P
PubMed ID
21410903 View in PubMed
Less detail

Results of an outpatient multidisciplinary COPD rehabilitation programme obtained in two settings: primary and secondary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136134
Source
Clin Respir J. 2011 Apr;5(2):84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Susanne Vest
Lill Moll
Marelis Petersen
Tove Fedder Buch
Ditte Marie Bruun
Marie Rask
Anette Wester
Allan Linneberg
Author Affiliation
Department of internal Medicine M, Glostrup University Hospital, the Capital Region of Denmark.
Source
Clin Respir J. 2011 Apr;5(2):84-91
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Abstract
There is limited experience with implementation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) rehabilitation in primary care settings. We aimed to evaluate the implementation of a COPD rehabilitation programme in a primary care setting and compare the effects with those obtained in a secondary health-care setting.
The same outpatient multidisciplinary 7-week rehabilitation programme was implemented in a primary (day care nursery) and a secondary (hospital) health-care setting. Disease-specific quality of life (QoL) and endurance shuttle walking time (ESWT) was assessed at the start and end of the programme. Additionally, QoL was assessed again at a 3-months follow-up.
No serious problems or adverse events were encountered during the training/rehabilitation sessions. A total of 48 patients (81.3%) and 75 patients (84.2%) completed the 7-week rehabilitation programme in the primary and secondary settings, respectively. Within both centres, we found statistically significant improvements of ESWT and total St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score. The improvement of ESWT was significantly greater in the secondary care setting than in the primary care setting.
we found that it was possible to implement a COPD rehabilitation programme in a Danish primary care setting. In this non-randomised study, improvements of QoL and ESWT obtained in the primary care setting were reasonably similar to those obtained in the secondary care setting.
PubMed ID
21410900 View in PubMed
Less detail

Smoking, stages of change and decisional balance in Iceland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136135
Source
Clin Respir J. 2011 Apr;5(2):76-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Sigrídur B Fjalldal
Christer Janson
Bryndís Benediktsdóttir
Gunnar Gudmundsson
Peter Burney
A Sonia Buist
William M Vollmer
Thórarinn Gíslason
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Sleep, Landspitali-University Hospital, Iceland.
Source
Clin Respir J. 2011 Apr;5(2):76-83
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Decision Making
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Smoking
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Smoking remains a significant health problem. Smoking interventions are important but selection of successful quitters can be difficult.
To characterise smokers with emphasis on two constructs of the transtheoretical model, the stages of change and decisional balance.
A random sample from adults aged 40 and over in Reykjavik, Iceland, and Uppsala, Sweden. Smokers were defined as being in the stage of pre-contemplation (not thinking of quitting within the next 6 months), contemplation (thinking of quitting within the next 6 months) or preparation (thinking of quitting within the next 30 days, having managed to quit for at least 24 h within the last 12 months).
A total of 226 participants were smokers: 72 (32%) were in the pre-contemplation stage, 126 (56%) in the contemplation stage and 28 (12%) in the preparation stage. A younger age, higher body mass index (BMI) and higher educational level were significantly related to being in a more advanced stage. A significant association was observed between decisional balance and stages of change such that decreased importance of the positive aspects of smoking and increased importance of the negative aspects of smoking were independently associated with an increased readiness to quit.
The motivated smoker is likely to be young and educated with an above average BMI. A smoker in the contemplation stage is likely to maintain the negative aspects of smoking at a high level. Decreasing the value of the pros of smoking may facilitate the shift towards the stage of preparation.
PubMed ID
21410899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Positive effect of kangaroo mother care on long-term breastfeeding in very preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136136
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Mar-Apr;40(2):190-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Renée Flacking
Uwe Ewald
Lars Wallin
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Uppsala, Sweden. rfl@du.se
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Mar-Apr;40(2):190-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the use of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and its association with breastfeeding at 1 to 6 months of corrected age in mothers of very preterm (VPT) and preterm (PT) infants.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Neonatal Intensive Care Units in four counties in Sweden.
The study included 103 VPT (
PubMed ID
21410756 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of out-of-pocket expenses on discontinuation of statin therapy: a cohort study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136137
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2012 Feb;37(1):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
A. Helin-Salmivaara
M J Korhonen
T. Alanen
R. Huupponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, University of Turku, Finland. arja.helin-salmivaara@utu.fi
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2012 Feb;37(1):58-64
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Drug Costs
Drug Substitution - economics
Drugs, Generic - administration & dosage - economics
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Heptanoic Acids - administration & dosage - economics
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - economics
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - economics
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pyrroles - administration & dosage - economics
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Simvastatin - administration & dosage - economics
Abstract
Out-of-pocket expenses of drug therapy may negatively affect adherence. We aimed to analyse 1-year discontinuation rates between cohorts initiating therapy with either generic simvastatin or non-generic atorvastatin.
Statin-naìve initiators of atorvastatin and generic simvastatin in April-June 2003, and corresponding cohorts in 2005, were identified through the nationwide Finnish prescription register. Persistence with statin therapy was followed for 365 days, considering the treatment to have been discontinued when the tablet-free gap between two consecutive refills exceeded 90 days. Using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression, odds ratios (OR) for discontinuation associated with initiating with simvastatin vs. atorvastatin were estimated separately for each year.
In the year 2003, 5838 persons initiated treatment with atorvastatin and 5644 with generic simvastatin. In the year 2005, the respective numbers were 5228 and 10 987. Soon after the introduction of generic substitution in 2003, there was no difference in the risk of discontinuation between the comparator groups [OR 0·97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·89-1·05]. Two years later, persons initiating with generic simvastatin were 20% less likely to discontinue statin therapy (OR 0·80; 95% CI 0·74-0·83). Among persons whose medicinal costs were almost completely reimbursed towards the end of the initiation year, the OR was 1·14 (95% CI 0·76-1·64, P = 0·033 for interaction).
We found that lower out-of-pocket expenses associated with the initiating statin had a positive impact on persistence with therapy. The finding does not seem to apply to persons with minor copayments towards the end of the initiation year.
PubMed ID
21410736 View in PubMed
Less detail

299580 records – page 1 of 29958.