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300943 records – page 1 of 30095.

Dissociation and abuse among multiple-personality patients, prostitutes, and exotic dancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229537
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;41(3):328-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990

Total and coronary heart disease mortality in relation to major risk factors--Quebec cardiovascular study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229538
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1990 Mar;6(2):59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
G R Dagenais
Z. Ahmed
N M Robitaille
S. Gingras
P J Lupien
A. Christen
F. Meyer
J. Rochon
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1990 Mar;6(2):59-65
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality
Educational Status
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
The relationships of blood pressure, smoking, serum cholesterol and education levels on total and coronary artery disease (CAD) mortality were evaluated in 4576 Quebec men aged 35 to 64 years, free from overt CAD at entry and followed for 12 years. From January 1974 to January 1986, there were 417 deaths, 131 due to CAD. A progressive increase in total and CAD mortality was observed from quintile 3 to 5 for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In comparison to quintile 1, the adjusted relative risks of quintiles 4 and 5 for systolic blood pressure were significantly elevated (2 P less than 0.01), being 1.5 and 2.0 for total mortality, and 2.6 and 3.5 for CAD mortality, respectively. The relative risks of quintiles 4 and 5 for diastolic blood pressure were also significantly elevated (2 P less than 0.04), being 1.5 and 1.6 for total mortality and 1.9 and 2.7 for CAD mortality, respectively. In comparison to those who never smoked, the relative risks of smoking one to 20, and 21 and more cigarettes per day, were 2.1 (2 P less than 0.003) and 3.1 (2 P less than 0.0001) for overall mortality, and 2.2 (2 P less than 0.08) and 3.5 (2 P less than 0.002) for CAD mortality. Men who had discontinued smoking at least one year before the study, had a relative risk not different from those who had never smoked. Serum cholesterol and education levels were not significantly associated with total or CAD mortality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2310996 View in PubMed
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Guns and suicide: possible effects of some specific legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229539
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;147(3):342-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
C L Rich
J G Young
R C Fowler
J. Wagner
N A Black
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;147(3):342-6
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
California
Female
Firearms
Humans
Legislation as Topic
Male
Ontario
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Wounds, Gunshot - mortality
Abstract
The authors describe suicide rates in Toronto and Ontario and methods used for suicide in Toronto for 5 years before and after enactment of Canadian gun control legislation in 1978. They also present data from San Diego, Calif., where state laws attempt to limit access to guns by certain psychiatric patients. Both sets of data indicate that gun control legislation may have led to decreased use of guns by suicidal men, but the difference was apparently offset by an increase in suicide by leaping. In the case of men using guns for suicide, these data support a hypothesis of substitution of suicide method.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 1991 Jan;148(1):149-501984701
PubMed ID
2309953 View in PubMed
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The family physician and smoking in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229540
Source
J Fam Pract. 1990 Mar;30(3):344-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
H P Batty
H F King
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Fam Pract. 1990 Mar;30(3):344-6
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Ontario
Physicians, Family
Pregnancy
Smoking - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2307949 View in PubMed
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Munchausen syndrome by proxy and apnea (MBPA). A survey of apnea programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229541
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1990 Mar;29(3):162-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
M J Light
M S Sheridan
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1990 Mar;29(3):162-8
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apnea - epidemiology - physiopathology
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Munchausen Syndrome - epidemiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Regional Medical Programs - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors sent questionnaires to 127 apnea monitoring programs asking whether they had treated patients whose apnea appeared to have been induced by a parent (Munchausen syndrome by proxy-apnea, or MBPA). Fifty-one programs (40%) reported 54 cases of this kind from among their 20,090 monitored patients (0.27%). The authors obtained further information on 32 of these patients, 83% of whom presented with infantile apnea before the third month of life. Although medical problems were documented, including apnea, the clinical condition of these infants was inconsistent with the multiple life-threatening episodes typically reported by parents. Twenty-one of the infants reportedly received cardiopulmonary resuscitation at home, 15 had ambulance calls to the home, and 24 were rehospitalized. Child Protective Service agencies were consulted for 12 patients, 5 of whom were placed in foster homes. Three index infants and five siblings are known to be dead, and one additional infant is severely brain damaged from abuse.
PubMed ID
2306902 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of external cause-of-injury codes using hospital records from the Indian Health Service, 1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229543
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 Mar;80(3):279-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
S M Smith
L S Colwell
J E Sniezek
Author Affiliation
Division of Injury Epidemiology and Control, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 Mar;80(3):279-81
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Administration
Hospital records
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Inuits
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - classification - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
To evaluate the usefulness of International Classification of Diseases external cause-of-injury and poisoning codes (E codes) for public health surveillance of nonfatal injuries, we analyzed E codes from Indian Health Service (IHS) hospital records. E codes for unknown or unspecified causes were used for 25 percent of records. At two hospitals, 63 percent of E codes assigned by independent coders agreed; another 18 percent matched on general cause-of-injury groups. With uniform guidelines and increased training, E coding could provide a valuable, cost-effective method of quantifying and characterizing severe, nonfatal injuries.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1988;10:164-903066626
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Mar;129(3):616-242916555
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1988 Mar-Apr;103(2):2073128839
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Mar;71(3):242-507468855
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Nov 14;313(20):1263-94058507
PubMed ID
2305904 View in PubMed
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Iv drug use and HIV infection: perspective from a small city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229544
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 1;142(5):469-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1990

Diagnosis of dystocia and management with cesarean section among primiparous women in Ottawa-Carleton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229545
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 1;142(5):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1990
Author
P J Stewart
C. Dulberg
A C Arnill
T. Elmslie
P F Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 1;142(5):459-63
Date
Mar-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - utilization
Dystocia - diagnosis - surgery
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Induced
Ontario
Parity
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Trial of Labor
Abstract
We carried out a chart review study to determine the rate of diagnosis of dystocia (abnormal progress) and the use of cesarean section to treat dystocia among 3887 primiparous women who gave birth to a single baby in the vertex presentation at four hospitals in Ottawa-Carleton in 1984. Of the 3740 women who had some labour 1127 (30.1%) were given a diagnosis of dystocia. Cesarean section for dystocia was done during all phases of labour (41% of procedures in the latent phase, 38% in the active phase and 21% in the second stage). The cesarean section rate varied among the hospitals from 11.8% to 19.6%. A total of 75% of the cesarean sections were for dystocia, disproportion or failed induction. The findings suggest that cesarean section is being done for disproportion without a trial of labour beyond the latent phase and for dystocia in the absence of fetal distress. If these practices were modified the cesarean section rate could be reduced from 16% to about 8%, the rate found in some other centres and that observed in Canada in the early 1970s.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1987 Mar 7;1(8532):548-512881091
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Dec 8;319(23):1511-63185675
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1984 Apr;63(4):485-906700893
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Oct 1;125(7):723-67326654
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Jan;61(1):1-56823339
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1980 Mar 6;302(10):559-636986017
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 Jun 1;142(11):1187-82188718
PubMed ID
2302643 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis surveillance in immigrants to Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229546
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 1;142(5):453-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1990
Author
P H Orr
J. Manfreda
E S Hershfield
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 1;142(5):453-8
Date
Mar-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Emigration and Immigration
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient compliance
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Registries
Risk
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Despite a decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis in Canada over the last decade, the proportion of cases in people not born in Canada has increased. To determine the prevalence of active tuberculosis at the first surveillance clinic visit and the incidence of the disease over a 2-year to 6-year follow-up period, we reviewed the records of all 523 immigrants admitted to Manitoba between 1981 and 1985 who were placed under surveillance. Of the 523, 429 (82%) were seen at least once in the clinic. Among the 429, active tuberculosis was diagnosed at the first visit in 12 (3%) and during the follow-up period in 7 (2%). The relative risk of tuberculosis was 4.5 times higher for immigrants under surveillance than for those not under surveillance. Of the 483 immigrants who were to be seen in Winnipeg 232 (48%) were noncompliant: 94 were not seen at any time, and 138 did not attend for the full follow-up period. Active disease was not reported to have developed in any of the noncompliant subjects. Noncompliers were significantly older than compliers (p less than 0.005), and variations in compliance were noted according to region of origin. Further attempts to improve compliance with surveillance without resorting to punitive measures are indicated.
Notes
Cites: Adv Tuberc Res. 1980;20:1-637395639
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Jan;119(1):11-8420429
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1977 Sep;116(3):561-4900644
Cites: Int Migr Rev. 1987 Fall;21(3):845-5612314908
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 May 15;134(10):1149-523697860
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Nov;71(11):1223-77294264
PubMed ID
2302642 View in PubMed
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300943 records – page 1 of 30095.