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Sports and exercise-related tendinopathies: a review of selected topical issues by participants of the second International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) Vancouver 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114748
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jun;47(9):536-44
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Alex Scott
Sean Docking
Bill Vicenzino
Håkan Alfredson
Richard J Murphy
Andrew J Carr
Johannes Zwerver
Kirsten Lundgreen
Oliver Finlay
Noel Pollock
Jill L Cook
Angela Fearon
Craig R Purdam
Alison Hoens
Jonathan D Rees
Thomas J Goetz
Patrik Danielson
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ascott@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 Jun;47(9):536-44
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Achilles Tendon - injuries
British Columbia
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Exercise - physiology
Humans
Musculoskeletal Pain - etiology - rehabilitation
Patellar Ligament - injuries
Rotator Cuff - injuries
Sports - physiology
Tendinopathy - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Tendon Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Tennis Elbow - etiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In September 2010, the first International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) was held in Umeå, Sweden, to establish a forum for original scientific and clinical insights in this growing field of clinical research and practice. The second ISTS was organised by the same group and held in Vancouver, Canada, in September 2012. This symposium was preceded by a round-table meeting in which the participants engaged in focused discussions, resulting in the following overview of tendinopathy clinical and research issues. This paper is a narrative review and summary developed during and after the second ISTS. The document is designed to highlight some key issues raised at ISTS 2012, and to integrate them into a shared conceptual framework. It should be considered an update and a signposting document rather than a comprehensive review. The document is developed for use by physiotherapists, physicians, athletic trainers, massage therapists and other health professionals as well as team coaches and strength/conditioning managers involved in care of sportspeople or workers with tendinopathy.
Notes
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Erratum In: Br J Sports Med. 2013 Aug;47(12):774Murphy, Richard J [added]; Carr, Andrew J [added]
PubMed ID
23584762 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification and brief treatment of alcohol problems with medical patients: an international perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9786
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Feb;27(2):262-70
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Nancy P Barnett
Peter M Monti
Cheryl Cherpitel
Preben Bendtsen
Guilherme Borges
Suzanne M Colby
Cecilia Nordqvist
Kjell Johansson
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA. Nancy_Barnett@brown.edu
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Feb;27(2):262-70
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Mass Screening
Mexican Americans - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mexico
Patient care team
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Psychotherapy, Brief
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium at the 2002 RSA meeting in San Francisco, California. The chair was Peter Monti and co-chair was Nancy Barnett. The aim of the symposium was to bring together researchers from the United States, Sweden, and Mexico to present current findings on the development and implementation of screening and intervention research in Emergency Departments (ED). Cheryl Cherpitel presented findings on the performance of the Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen (RAPS4), a 4-item instrument used for screening for alcohol dependence and harmful drinking in the ED. Dr. Cherpitel also presented for her collaborator, Guilherme Borges, their research on the performance of a number of screening measures including the RAPS among Mexicans and Mexican-Americans with alcohol-related disorders in the ED. Preben Bendtsen described the implementation of an alcohol screening and intervention procedure delivered by ordinary ED staff in Sweden. Nancy Barnett presented data on characteristics related to readiness to change alcohol use in a sample of young adults who were treated in an ED for injury or intoxication.
PubMed ID
12605075 View in PubMed
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Antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection: Swedish recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185348
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(3):155-67
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2003
Author
Eric Sandström
Ingrid Uhnoo
Jane Ahlqvist-Rastad
Göran Bratt
Torsten Berglund
Magnus Gisslén
Stefan Lindbäck
Linda Morfeldt
Lars Ståhle
Anders Sönnerborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Venereology, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(3):155-67
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - standards
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Male
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The Swedish guidelines (SwG) for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have several important roles. A major task involves the promotion of a uniformly high standard of care in all HIV treatment clinics in Sweden and the identification of strengths, weaknesses and relevance of recent research findings. CD4+ T-cell counts
PubMed ID
12751710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnosis and treatment of dementia: 4. Approach to management of mild to moderate dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154868
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-7-2008
Author
David B Hogan
Peter Bailey
Sandra Black
Anne Carswell
Howard Chertkow
Barry Clarke
Carole Cohen
John D Fisk
Dorothy Forbes
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Krista Lanctôt
Debra Morgan
Lilian Thorpe
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dhogan@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Date
Oct-7-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Combined Modality Therapy
Dementia - diagnosis - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The management of mild to moderate dementia presents complex and evolving challenges. Practising physicians are often uncertain about the appropriate approaches to issues such as the disclosure of the diagnosis, driving and caregiver support. In this article, we provide practical guidance on management based on recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia.
We developed evidence-based guidelines using systematic literature searches, with specific criteria for the selection and quality assessment of articles, and a clear and transparent decision-making process. We selected articles published from January 1996 to December 2005 that dealt with the management of mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia. Recommendations based on the literature review were drafted and voted on. Consensus required 80% or more agreement by participants. Subsequent to the conference, we searched for additional articles published from January 2006 to April 2008 using the same major keywords and secondary search terms. We graded the strength of evidence using the criteria of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
We identified 1615 articles, of which 954 were selected for further study. From a synthesis of the evidence in these studies, we made 48 recommendations for the management of mild to moderate dementia (28) and dementia with a cerebrovascular component (8) as well as recommendations for addressing ethical issues (e.g., disclosure of the diagnosis) (12). The updated literature review did not change these recommendations. In brief, patients and their families should be informed of the diagnosis. Although the specifics of managing comorbid conditions might require modification, standards of care and treatment targets would not change because of a mild dementia. The use of medications with anticholinergic effects should be minimized. There should be proactive planning for driving cessation, since this will be required at some point in the course of progressive dementia. The patient's ability to drive should be determined primarily on the basis of his or her functional abilities. An important aspect of care is supporting the patient's primary caregiver.
Much has been learned about the care of patients with mild to moderate dementia and the support of their primary caregivers. There is a pressing need for the development, and dissemination, of collaborative systems of care.
Notes
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Erratum In: CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):932
PubMed ID
18838454 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136941
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):60-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Atul Verma
Laurent Macle
Jafna Cox
Allan C Skanes
Author Affiliation
Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. atul.verma@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):60-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology - surgery
Atrial Flutter - surgery
Canada
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects - methods
Heart Atria - surgery
Humans
Patient Selection
Postoperative Complications - etiology
Pulmonary Veins - surgery
Reoperation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) offers a promising treatment for the maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients for whom a rhythm control strategy is desired. While the precise mechanisms of AF are incompletely understood, there is substantial evidence that in many cases (particularly for paroxysmal AF), ectopic activity most commonly located in and around the pulmonary veins of the left atrium plays a central role in triggering and/or maintaining arrhythmic episodes. Catheter ablation involves electrically disconnecting the pulmonary veins from the rest of the left atrium to prevent AF from being triggered. Further substrate modification may be required in patients with more persistent AF. Successful ablation of AF has never been shown to alter mortality or obviate the need for oral anticoagulation; thus, the primary indication for this procedure should be improvement of symptoms caused by AF. The success rate of catheter ablation for AF is superior to the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs, but success is still in the range of 75%-90% after 2 procedures. Ablation is also associated with a complication rate of 2%-3%. Thus, ablation should primarily be used as a second-line therapy after failure of antiarrhythmic drugs. In contrast to AF, catheter ablation of atrial flutter has a higher success rate with a smaller incidence of complications. Thus, catheter ablation for atrial flutter may be considered a first-line alternative to antiarrhythmic drugs.
PubMed ID
21329863 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: rate and rhythm management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136942
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):47-59
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
Anne M Gillis
Atul Verma
Mario Talajic
Stanley Nattel
Paul Dorian
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary/Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. amgillis@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):47-59
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Amiodarone - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - etiology
Atrial Flutter - drug therapy
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiac Output, Low - complications - drug therapy
Catheter Ablation
Digoxin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Flecainide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy
Pacemaker, Artificial
Propafenone - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Referral and Consultation
Sotalol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The goals of atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) arrhythmia management are to alleviate patient symptoms, improve patient quality of life, and minimize the morbidity associated with AF and AFL. Arrhythmia management usually commences with drugs to slow the ventricular rate. The addition of class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs for restoration or maintenance of sinus rhythm is largely determined by patient symptoms and preferences. For rate control, treatment of persistent or permanent AF and AFL should aim for a resting heart rate of 35%, dronedarone, sotalol, or amiodarone is recommended. In patients with left ventricular ejection fraction
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):388
PubMed ID
21329862 View in PubMed
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The implications of RTI and EBP for SLPs: commentary on L. M. Justice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80220
Source
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2006 Oct;37(4):298-303
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Ukrainetz Teresa A
Author Affiliation
Division of Communication Disorders, Dept. 3311, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Ave, Laramie, WY 82071-3311, USA. tukraine@uwyo.edu
Source
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2006 Oct;37(4):298-303
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Child
Eligibility Determination
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Language Disorders - therapy
Language Therapy - methods
Speech Disorders - therapy
Speech Therapy - methods
Speech-Language Pathology - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: This commentary responds to Justice's article on response to intervention (RTI) and evidence-based practice (EBP) for reading instruction. The educational changes brought about by RTI and EBP provide an opportunity as well as a challenge for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to make fundamental changes in service delivery. METHOD: In this article, I discuss how RTI will change who qualifies as reading disabled and who receives special reading instruction. I examine how RTI might change who qualifies and how they qualify for speech-language services. Finally, I consider what can be taken from EPB and RTI to improve speech-language service delivery. CONCLUSION: RTI has the potential to fundamentally change regular education and its interface with special education. If SLP clinicians, researchers, and policymakers recognize the possibilities, RTI could also significantly and positively impact educational speech-language pathology.
Notes
Comment On: Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2006 Oct;37(4):284-9717041078
PubMed ID
17041079 View in PubMed
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Report of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke workshop on perinatal and childhood stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192033
Source
Pediatrics. 2002 Jan;109(1):116-23
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jan-2002
Author
John Kylan Lynch
Deborah G Hirtz
Gabrielle DeVeber
Karin B Nelson
Author Affiliation
Neuroepidemiology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. lynchj@ninds.nih.gov
Source
Pediatrics. 2002 Jan;109(1):116-23
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Prevalence
Prognosis
Recurrence
Risk factors
Stroke - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Office of Rare Disorders sponsored a workshop on perinatal and childhood stroke in Bethesda, Maryland, on September 18 and 19, 2000. This was an international workshop to bring together experts in the field of perinatal and childhood stroke. Topics covered included epidemiology, animal models, risk factors, outcome and prognosis, and areas of future research for perinatal and childhood stroke. Stroke in infants and children is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and an emerging area for clinical and translational research. Currently, there is no consensus on the classification, evaluation, outcome measurement, or treatment of perinatal and childhood stroke. Pediatric stroke registries are needed to generate data regarding risk factors, recurrence, and outcome. The impact of maternal and perinatal factors on risk and outcome of neonatal stroke needs to be studied. This information is essential to identifying significant areas for future treatment and prevention.
PubMed ID
11773550 View in PubMed
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Some "tried and true" treatments challenged during Royal College meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210340
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Dec 15;155(12):1725-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Dec-15-1996
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 1998 Jan;8 Suppl 1:6-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
M G Hennerici
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Deutschland. Hennerici@neuropc1.neuroma.uni-heidelberg.de
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 1998 Jan;8 Suppl 1:6-8
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Europe
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
PubMed ID
9547028 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.