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The opioid dependent mother and newborn- an update. The 6th Annual Ivey Symposium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126248
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2012;19(1):e73-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
Author
Ron Abrahams
Claudette Chase
Judy Desmoulin
Mel Kahan
David Knoppert
Gideon Koren
Laura Lyons
Alice Ordean
Henry Roukema
Fatima Uddin
Author Affiliation
The University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2012;19(1):e73-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome - therapy
Opioid-Related Disorders - complications - rehabilitation
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - rehabilitation
Abstract
The sixth Ivey Chair Symposium, held at the University of Western Ontario in October 2011, was dedicated to an update on the complex issues surrounding opioid dependent mothers and their newborns. The day commenced with Loretta Finnegan who provided a historical overview of the complex issues surrounding the addicted mother and her baby suffering from neonatal withdrawal syndrome. It is remarkable that the tool devised by Dr Finnegan forty years ago is in wide use today, capturing accurately the severity of NAS and the need for follow up and treatment. She stressed that comprehensive approach to the care of pregnant drug-dependent mothers and their babies significantly reduces maternal and infant's morbidity. The risk of low birth weight and severe withdrawal can be reduced substantially when both patients in this dyad are optimally cared for. The seven speakers following her provided an update on the medicinal and non drug approach to treat the opioid-dependent mother and her newborn, including new Canadian guidelines which were just released. 
PubMed ID
22408113 View in PubMed
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Standardizing umbilical catheter usage in preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104299
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1742-52
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Shaneela Shahid
Sourabh Dutta
Amanda Symington
Sandesh Shivananda
Author Affiliation
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University and Children's Hospital Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1742-52
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Bacteremia - prevention & control - transmission
Catheterization, Central Venous - utilization
Catheters, Indwelling - standards - utilization
Cross Infection - prevention & control - transmission
Feasibility Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Intervention Studies
Male
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality Improvement - standards
Sepsis - prevention & control - transmission
Umbilical Arteries
Umbilical Veins
Unnecessary Procedures - utilization
Utilization Review
Abstract
Absence of guidelines on umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) and umbilical venous catheter (UVC) use and inability to predict the hospital course may sway the frontline staff to overuse umbilical catheters in preterm infants. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters and its impact on the incidence of sepsis and resource use.
All inborn infants delivered at
PubMed ID
24843063 View in PubMed
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[Educational master-course on arrterial hypertension and cardiovascular risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158893
Source
Kardiologiia. 2008;48(1):77-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2008

Major depressive disorder treatment guidelines in America and Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144294
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;71 Suppl E1:e04
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
Author
Jonathan R T Davidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. david011@mc.duke.edu
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;71 Suppl E1:e04
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Europe
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Psychotherapy
Recurrence - prevention & control
United States
Abstract
The various major American and European guidelines for the treatment of depression provide similar basic principles of treatment, which include individualizing the treatment plan, preparing the patient for potential long-term treatment, providing measurement-based care, and treating to remission. While the guidelines are all evidence-based, certain factors can influence differences in specific recommendations, such as the consensus group's composition, underlying mandates, and cultural attitudes. The similarities and differences among 6 sets of guidelines from Europe and the Americas published in the past decade are reviewed here (American Psychiatric Association, British Association for Psychopharmacology, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Texas Medication Algorithm Project, and World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry). In the guidelines, mild depression has the most variance in treatment recommendations; some, but not all, guidelines suggest that it may resolve with exercise or watchful waiting, but psychotherapy or antidepressants could be used if initial efforts fail. Moderate and severe major depression carry broadly similar recommendations among the guidelines. First-line treatment recommendations for moderate major depressive disorder include antidepressant monotherapy, psychotherapy, and the combination of both. Severe depression may require the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic, electroconvulsive therapy, or the combination of an antidepressant and psychotherapy. Benzodiazepines play a very limited role in the treatment of depression; if the patient has catatonic depression, acutely suicidal depression, or depression with symptoms of anxiety, agitation, or insomnia, benzodiazepines are recommended by some guidelines for short-term treatment only.
PubMed ID
20371031 View in PubMed
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Antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection: Swedish recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185348
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(3):155-67
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2003
Author
Eric Sandström
Ingrid Uhnoo
Jane Ahlqvist-Rastad
Göran Bratt
Torsten Berglund
Magnus Gisslén
Stefan Lindbäck
Linda Morfeldt
Lars Ståhle
Anders Sönnerborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Venereology, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(3):155-67
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - standards
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Male
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The Swedish guidelines (SwG) for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have several important roles. A major task involves the promotion of a uniformly high standard of care in all HIV treatment clinics in Sweden and the identification of strengths, weaknesses and relevance of recent research findings. CD4+ T-cell counts
PubMed ID
12751710 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis and treatment of dementia: 4. Approach to management of mild to moderate dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154868
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-7-2008
Author
David B Hogan
Peter Bailey
Sandra Black
Anne Carswell
Howard Chertkow
Barry Clarke
Carole Cohen
John D Fisk
Dorothy Forbes
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Krista Lanctôt
Debra Morgan
Lilian Thorpe
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dhogan@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Date
Oct-7-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Combined Modality Therapy
Dementia - diagnosis - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The management of mild to moderate dementia presents complex and evolving challenges. Practising physicians are often uncertain about the appropriate approaches to issues such as the disclosure of the diagnosis, driving and caregiver support. In this article, we provide practical guidance on management based on recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia.
We developed evidence-based guidelines using systematic literature searches, with specific criteria for the selection and quality assessment of articles, and a clear and transparent decision-making process. We selected articles published from January 1996 to December 2005 that dealt with the management of mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia. Recommendations based on the literature review were drafted and voted on. Consensus required 80% or more agreement by participants. Subsequent to the conference, we searched for additional articles published from January 2006 to April 2008 using the same major keywords and secondary search terms. We graded the strength of evidence using the criteria of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
We identified 1615 articles, of which 954 were selected for further study. From a synthesis of the evidence in these studies, we made 48 recommendations for the management of mild to moderate dementia (28) and dementia with a cerebrovascular component (8) as well as recommendations for addressing ethical issues (e.g., disclosure of the diagnosis) (12). The updated literature review did not change these recommendations. In brief, patients and their families should be informed of the diagnosis. Although the specifics of managing comorbid conditions might require modification, standards of care and treatment targets would not change because of a mild dementia. The use of medications with anticholinergic effects should be minimized. There should be proactive planning for driving cessation, since this will be required at some point in the course of progressive dementia. The patient's ability to drive should be determined primarily on the basis of his or her functional abilities. An important aspect of care is supporting the patient's primary caregiver.
Much has been learned about the care of patients with mild to moderate dementia and the support of their primary caregivers. There is a pressing need for the development, and dissemination, of collaborative systems of care.
Notes
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Erratum In: CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):932
PubMed ID
18838454 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation care: challenges in clinical practice and educational needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136937
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):98-104
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Suzanne Murray
Patrice Lazure
Carolyn Pullen
Paule Maltais
Paul Dorian
Author Affiliation
AXDEV Group Inc., Brossard, Québec, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):98-104
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Canada
Cardiology - education
Catheter Ablation
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Medical, Continuing
Emergency Medicine - education
Evidence-Based Medicine
Family Practice - education
Female
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Male
Middle Aged
Neurology - education
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
Current debates around the choice of management strategy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) combined with limited efficacy and frequent adverse effects of current pharmacotherapies cause uncertainty and confusion, challenging optimal care delivery to AF patients.
To determine gaps in knowledge, skill, and competencies of Canadian physicians caring for patients with AF as well as underlying causes of these gaps.
A mixed-method approach --consisting of qualitative (semistructured interviews) and quantitative data collection techniques (online survey) --was conducted. Findings were triangulated to ensure the reliability and trustworthiness of findings. The combined sample (n = 161) included 43 family physicians/general practitioners, 23 internal medicine specialists, 48 cardiologists, 28 emergency physicians, 14 neurologists, and 5 patients.
Gaps and barriers impeding optimal care were related to an unclear definition of AF, uncertainty of its pathophysiology, and knowledge gaps across the care continuum, including screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Clinical decision-making, individualized patient therapy, communication with patients and between professionals, and application of guidelines were found to be particularly challenging. These issues are discussed in the context of the newly revised Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) AF Guidelines.
Educational gaps exist across the entire continuum of care. Results from this study, along with the 2011 CCS guidelines for AF management, provide direction for solutions through physician education and professional development.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):388
PubMed ID
21329867 View in PubMed
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Patient safety in emergency medical services: executive summary and recommendations from the Niagara Summit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137002
Source
CJEM. 2011 Jan;13(1):13-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Blair L Bigham
Ellen Bull
Merideth Morrison
Rob Burgess
Janet Maher
Steven C Brooks
Laurie J Morrison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. bighamb@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
CJEM. 2011 Jan;13(1):13-8
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Decision Making
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Ontario
Patients
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Safety Management - standards
Abstract
Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel care for patients in challenging and dynamic environments that may contribute to an increased risk for adverse events. However, little is known about the risks to patient safety in the EMS setting. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted a systematic review of the literature, including nonrandomized, noncontrolled studies, conducted qualitative interviews of key informants, and, with the assistance of a pan-Canadian advisory board, hosted a 1-day summit of 52 experts in the field of EMS patient safety. The intent of the summit was to review available research, discuss the issues affecting prehospital patient safety, and discuss interventions that might improve the safety of the EMS industry. The primary objective was to define the strategic goals for improving patient safety in EMS. Participants represented all geographic regions of Canada and included administrators, educators, physicians, researchers, and patient safety experts. Data were collected through electronic voting and qualitative analysis of the discussions. The group reached consensus on nine recommendations to increase awareness, reduce adverse events, and suggest research and educational directions in EMS patient safety: increasing awareness of patient safety principles, improving adverse event reporting through creating nonpunitive reporting systems, supporting paramedic clinical decision making through improved research and education, policy changes, using flexible algorithms, adopting patient safety strategies from other disciplines, increasing funding for research in patient safety, salary support for paramedic researchers, and access to graduate training in prehospital research.
PubMed ID
21324292 View in PubMed
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World Hypertension League statement. Hypertension control in the world: an agenda for the coming decade. Based on the 1995 WHL Ottawa Declaration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208810
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 1997 Apr;11(4):245-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Apr-1997

42 records – page 1 of 5.