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63 records – page 1 of 7.

Major depressive disorder treatment guidelines in America and Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144294
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;71 Suppl E1:e04
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
Author
Jonathan R T Davidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. david011@mc.duke.edu
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;71 Suppl E1:e04
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Europe
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Psychotherapy
Recurrence - prevention & control
United States
Abstract
The various major American and European guidelines for the treatment of depression provide similar basic principles of treatment, which include individualizing the treatment plan, preparing the patient for potential long-term treatment, providing measurement-based care, and treating to remission. While the guidelines are all evidence-based, certain factors can influence differences in specific recommendations, such as the consensus group's composition, underlying mandates, and cultural attitudes. The similarities and differences among 6 sets of guidelines from Europe and the Americas published in the past decade are reviewed here (American Psychiatric Association, British Association for Psychopharmacology, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Texas Medication Algorithm Project, and World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry). In the guidelines, mild depression has the most variance in treatment recommendations; some, but not all, guidelines suggest that it may resolve with exercise or watchful waiting, but psychotherapy or antidepressants could be used if initial efforts fail. Moderate and severe major depression carry broadly similar recommendations among the guidelines. First-line treatment recommendations for moderate major depressive disorder include antidepressant monotherapy, psychotherapy, and the combination of both. Severe depression may require the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic, electroconvulsive therapy, or the combination of an antidepressant and psychotherapy. Benzodiazepines play a very limited role in the treatment of depression; if the patient has catatonic depression, acutely suicidal depression, or depression with symptoms of anxiety, agitation, or insomnia, benzodiazepines are recommended by some guidelines for short-term treatment only.
PubMed ID
20371031 View in PubMed
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Arctic co-operation in child and adolescent psychiatry. Proceedings from the VI Congress on Circumpolar Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. August 27-30, 1991, Kajaani, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35980
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994;53 Suppl 1:1-71
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1994
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994;53 Suppl 1:1-71
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry
Arctic Regions
Child
Child Psychiatry
Humans
PubMed ID
8018223 View in PubMed
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Contaminants, health, effective risk assessment and communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286400
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Katelyn Friendship
Chris Furgal
Author Affiliation
Frost Centre for Canadian Studies- Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Studies Department, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Risk Management
Risk perception
Traditional foods
Contaminants
Traditional knowledge
Collaboration
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Abstract
Objectives: With a better understanding of northern Indigenous risk perceptions related to food safety, this research aims to identify the role that Indigenous knowledge can play in risk assessment and management processes in order to support and ensure more culturally relevant and effective benefit-risk management strategies. Study design: This work is a part of a circumpolar review that is conducting case study evaluations in four regions on the topic of Indigenous environmental health benefit-risk assessment and communication in relation to contaminant exposure through the consumption of traditional/country foods. Methods: This project examines a series of events and communities in Yukon Territory, Canada. Forty-one interviews with traditional food experts (TFE) and environment and health decision-makers (HEDM) were conducted and analysed for thematic content. The research also included an extensive document review. Results: Overall, people are confident in their own ways of determining the safety of food items. This is predominately based on physical indicators. Of the HEDM interviewees, there were varied levels of experience for including traditional knowledge in risk management; 45% had direct experience, 36% had experience in other aspects of research and 18% had no direct experience. All interviewees discussed collaboration as a valuable process for effective risk management. Conclusions: â??Effective risk management" is dictated by the effort given to include the affected communities or populations. Yukon First Nations have their own way for determining food safety, and these methods and perceptions need to be considered in the framing of risk issues and from the initial stages of the management process. True collaboration is crucial for effectiveness.
Documents
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Climate change and impacts on human health in the Arctic: an international workshop on emerging threats and the response of Arctic communities to climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89489
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Feb;68(1):84-91
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2009
  1 website  
Author
Parkinson, AJ
Berner, J
Author Affiliation
US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Arctic Investigations Program, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. ajp1@cdc.gov
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Feb;68(1):84-91
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environmental health
Greenhouse Effect
Health planning
Humans
Public Health
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Feb;68(1):6-719331237
PubMed ID
19331244 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Introduction to the Academic Symposium to Evaluate Evidence Regarding the Efficacy of Trauma Systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200773
Source
J Trauma. 1999 Sep;47(3 Suppl):S3-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
R J Mullins
N C Mann
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oregon Health Sciences University, School of Medicine, Portland 97201-3098, USA. mullinsr@ohsu.edu
Source
J Trauma. 1999 Sep;47(3 Suppl):S3-7
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs - standards
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
United States
PubMed ID
10496603 View in PubMed
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Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society Consensus Conference: 3. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207336
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Nov 1;157(9):1245-54
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-1-1997
Author
E. Rey
J. LeLorier
E. Burgess
I R Lange
L. Leduc
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Nov 1;157(9):1245-54
Date
Nov-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Canada
Diastole
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - drug therapy
Pregnancy outcome
Severity of Illness Index
Systole
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide Canadian physicians with evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.
No medication, or treatment with antihypertensive or anticonvulsant drugs.
Prevention of maternal complications, and prevention of perinatal complications and death.
Pertinent articles published from 1962 to September 1996 retrieved from the Pregnancy and Childbirth Module of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and from MEDLINE; additional articles retrieved through a manual search of bibliographies; and expert opinion. Recommendations were graded according to levels of evidence.
Maternal and fetal well-being were equally valued, with the belief that treatment side effects should be minimized.
Reduction in the rate of adverse perinatal outcomes, including death. Potential side effects of antihypertensive drugs include placental hypoperfusion, intrauterine growth retardation and long-term effects on the infant.
A systolic blood pressure greater than 169 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure greater than 109 mm Hg in a pregnant woman should be considered an emergency and pharmacologic treatment with hydralazine, labetalol or nifedipine started. Otherwise, the thresholds at which to start antihypertensive treatment are a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg in women with gestational hypertension without proteinuria or pre-existing hypertension before 28 weeks' gestation, those with gestational hypertension and proteinuria or symptoms at any time during the pregnancy, those with pre-existing hypertension and underlying conditions or target-organ damage, and those with pre-existing hypertension and superimposed gestational hypertension. The thresholds in other circumstances are a systolic pressure of 150 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 95 mm Hg. For nonsevere hypertension, methyldopa is the first-line drug; labetalol, pindolol, oxprenolol and nifedipine are second-line drugs. Fetal distress attributed to placental hypoperfusion is rare, and long-term effects on the infant are unknown. Magnesium sulfate is recommended for the prevention and treatment of seizures.
The guidelines are more precise but compatible with those from the US and Australia.
Notes
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Comment In: ACP J Club. 1998 May-Jun;128(3):63
PubMed ID
9361646 View in PubMed
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Complementary therapy and cancer: decision making by patients and their physicians setting a research agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183421
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Oct;38(2):87-92
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
C P Herbert
M. Verhoef
M. White
M. O'Beirne
R. Doll
Author Affiliation
UBC Department of Family Practice, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z3.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Oct;38(2):87-92
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Complementary Therapies - standards
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Priorities
Humans
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient Selection
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - psychology
Registries
Research Personnel - psychology
Abstract
An invitational meeting, entitled Complementary and Alternative Therapy: Decision Making by Cancer Patients and Their Physicians, brought together Canadian health care providers and researchers who had expertise in patient-physician communication with those who were knowledgeable about complementary therapy and cancer. The aim was to build on the existing knowledge base in both fields in order to determine the unanswered questions, the most important questions, and what methods can be applied for answering these questions. The interdisciplinary group employed a step-wise collaborative process to develop a suggested research agenda regarding decision making by physicians and their cancer patients regarding complementary therapy. The four themes identified are establishment of a registry for complementary therapy usage for cancer care; communication; outcomes measurement; and models of integration. It is hoped that these themes will be considered worthy of support by funding agencies and worthy of investigation by researchers.
PubMed ID
14528700 View in PubMed
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[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003

The Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health (NSAM).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221392
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1993 Apr;52(2):85-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Apr-1993
Author
P O Granberg
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1993 Apr;52(2):85-7
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
8318124 View in PubMed
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Proceedings from the symposium on Family Health in Circumpolar Regions. Ilulissat, Greenland, April 18-22, 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216526
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:1-121
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1995
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:1-121
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Family Health - ethnology
Humans
PubMed ID
7639892 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.