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Workshop report: physical activity and cancer prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196023
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2000;21(4):143-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2000
Author
L D Marrett
B. Theis
F D Ashbury
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. Loraine.marrett@cancercare.on.ca.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2000;21(4):143-9
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
National Health Programs
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Primary Prevention
Public Health
Abstract
A workshop to evaluate the evidence for the role of physical activity in cancer prevention and to identify priorities for action, particularly in relation to the primary prevention of cancer, was held by Cancer Care Ontario in March 2000. A review of the scientific evidence was commissioned and an expert panel convened to consider the review report and to make recommendations for public health, research and intervention. The panel concluded that evidence was convincing for the role of physical activity in preventing colon cancer; probable for breast cancer; possible for prostate cancer and insufficient for other sites. It is recommended that physical activity messages promoting at least 30 45 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity on most days of the week be included in primary prevention interventions for cancer. The panel recommended that future research on physical activity incorporate comprehensive assessments, including measures of the multiple dimensions and types of physical activity; biological mechanisms; and behavioural and population factors. Cancer Care Ontario will incorporate physical activity messages in its primary prevention programming around nutrition and health body weight.
PubMed ID
11171429 View in PubMed
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Self-Monitoring Blood Glucose Workshop I: Promoting meaningful dialogue and action at the provincial level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127838
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):55-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M J Dunbar
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. peggydunbar@diabetescareprogram.ns.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):55-8
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - economics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - economics
Evidence-Based Medicine
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nova Scotia
Patient Education as Topic
Physician's Practice Patterns
PubMed ID
22259830 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis and treatment of dementia: 4. Approach to management of mild to moderate dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154868
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-7-2008
Author
David B Hogan
Peter Bailey
Sandra Black
Anne Carswell
Howard Chertkow
Barry Clarke
Carole Cohen
John D Fisk
Dorothy Forbes
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Krista Lanctôt
Debra Morgan
Lilian Thorpe
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dhogan@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Date
Oct-7-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Combined Modality Therapy
Dementia - diagnosis - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The management of mild to moderate dementia presents complex and evolving challenges. Practising physicians are often uncertain about the appropriate approaches to issues such as the disclosure of the diagnosis, driving and caregiver support. In this article, we provide practical guidance on management based on recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia.
We developed evidence-based guidelines using systematic literature searches, with specific criteria for the selection and quality assessment of articles, and a clear and transparent decision-making process. We selected articles published from January 1996 to December 2005 that dealt with the management of mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia. Recommendations based on the literature review were drafted and voted on. Consensus required 80% or more agreement by participants. Subsequent to the conference, we searched for additional articles published from January 2006 to April 2008 using the same major keywords and secondary search terms. We graded the strength of evidence using the criteria of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
We identified 1615 articles, of which 954 were selected for further study. From a synthesis of the evidence in these studies, we made 48 recommendations for the management of mild to moderate dementia (28) and dementia with a cerebrovascular component (8) as well as recommendations for addressing ethical issues (e.g., disclosure of the diagnosis) (12). The updated literature review did not change these recommendations. In brief, patients and their families should be informed of the diagnosis. Although the specifics of managing comorbid conditions might require modification, standards of care and treatment targets would not change because of a mild dementia. The use of medications with anticholinergic effects should be minimized. There should be proactive planning for driving cessation, since this will be required at some point in the course of progressive dementia. The patient's ability to drive should be determined primarily on the basis of his or her functional abilities. An important aspect of care is supporting the patient's primary caregiver.
Much has been learned about the care of patients with mild to moderate dementia and the support of their primary caregivers. There is a pressing need for the development, and dissemination, of collaborative systems of care.
Notes
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Erratum In: CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):932
PubMed ID
18838454 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Apr;26(4):347-87, 389-436
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Amanda Black
Diane Francoeur
Timothy Rowe
John Collins
Dianne Miller
Thomas Brown
Michèle David
Sheila Dunn
William A Fisher
Nathalie Fleming
Claude A Fortin
Edith Guilbert
Louise Hanvey
André Lalonde
Ruth Miller
Margaret Morris
Teresa O'Grady
Helen Pymar
Thirza Smith
Elke Henneberg
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Apr;26(4):347-87, 389-436
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Contraception
Evidence-Based Medicine
Family Planning Services
Female
Gynecology - standards
Humans
Male
Societies, Medical - standards
Abstract
To provide guidelines for health-care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.
Overall efficacy of cited contraceptive methods, assessing reduction in pregnancy rate, risk of infection, safety, ease of use, and side effects; the effect of cited contraceptive methods on sexual health and general well-being; and the cost and availability of cited contraceptive methods in Canada.
Medline and the Cochrane Database were searched for articles in English on subjects related to contraception, sexuality, and sexual health from January 1988 to March 2003, in order to update the Report of the Consensus Committee on Contraception published in May-July 1998. Relevant Canadian Government publications and position papers from appropriate health and family planning organizations were also reviewed.
The quality of the evidence is rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Recommendations for practice are ranked according to the method described in this Report.
PubMed ID
15115624 View in PubMed
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Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106003
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1535-52
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Paul F Kantor
Jane Lougheed
Adrian Dancea
Michael McGillion
Nicole Barbosa
Carol Chan
Rejane Dillenburg
Joseph Atallah
Holger Buchholz
Catherine Chant-Gambacort
Jennifer Conway
Letizia Gardin
Kristen George
Steven Greenway
Derek G Human
Aamir Jeewa
Jack F Price
Robert D Ross
S Lucy Roche
Lindsay Ryerson
Reeni Soni
Judith Wilson
Kenny Wong
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: paul.kantor@albertahealthservices.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1535-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia - complications - diagnosis
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Cardiomyopathies - complications - diagnosis
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Catecholamines - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - etiology - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Differential
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Evidence-Based Medicine
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Heart Failure - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Humans
Infant
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocarditis - complications - diagnosis
Myocardium - pathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Vasopressins - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
Pediatric heart failure (HF) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. This article presents guidelines for the recognition, diagnosis, and early medical management of HF in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The guidelines are intended to assist practitioners in office-based or emergency room practice, who encounter children with undiagnosed heart disease and symptoms of possible HF, rather than those who have already received surgical palliation. The guidelines have been developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and are accompanied by practical Recommendations for their application in the clinical setting, supplemented by online material. This work does not include Recommendations for advanced management involving ventricular assist devices, or other device therapies.
PubMed ID
24267800 View in PubMed
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Complementary therapy and cancer: decision making by patients and their physicians setting a research agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183421
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Oct;38(2):87-92
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
C P Herbert
M. Verhoef
M. White
M. O'Beirne
R. Doll
Author Affiliation
UBC Department of Family Practice, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z3.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Oct;38(2):87-92
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Complementary Therapies - standards
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Priorities
Humans
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient Selection
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - psychology
Registries
Research Personnel - psychology
Abstract
An invitational meeting, entitled Complementary and Alternative Therapy: Decision Making by Cancer Patients and Their Physicians, brought together Canadian health care providers and researchers who had expertise in patient-physician communication with those who were knowledgeable about complementary therapy and cancer. The aim was to build on the existing knowledge base in both fields in order to determine the unanswered questions, the most important questions, and what methods can be applied for answering these questions. The interdisciplinary group employed a step-wise collaborative process to develop a suggested research agenda regarding decision making by physicians and their cancer patients regarding complementary therapy. The four themes identified are establishment of a registry for complementary therapy usage for cancer care; communication; outcomes measurement; and models of integration. It is hoped that these themes will be considered worthy of support by funding agencies and worthy of investigation by researchers.
PubMed ID
14528700 View in PubMed
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[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference recommendations on heart failure update 2007: Prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-45
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
J Malcom O Arnold
Jonathan G Howlett
Paul Dorian
Anique Ducharme
Nadia Giannetti
Haissam Haddad
George A Heckman
Andrew Ignaszewski
Debra Isaac
Philip Jong
Peter Liu
Elizabeth Mann
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
John D Parker
Anna M Svendsen
Ross T Tsuyuki
Kelly O'Halloran
Heather J Ross
Vivek Rao
Errol J Sequeira
Michel White
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. malcolm.arnold@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-45
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Biological Markers
Canada
Cardiac Output, Low - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Priorities
Heart Failure - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Humans
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Heart failure is common, yet it is difficult to treat. It presents in many different guises and circumstances in which therapy needs to be individualized. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations in January 2006 on the diagnosis and management of heart failure, and the present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for the prevention of heart failure, the management of heart failure during intercurrent illness, the treatment of acute heart failure, and the current and future roles of biomarkers in heart failure care. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: which patients should be identified as being at high risk of developing heart failure and which interventions should be used? What complications can occur in heart failure patients during an intercurrent illness, how should these patients be monitored and which medications may require a dose adjustment or discontinuation? What are the best therapeutic, both drug and nondrug, strategies for patients with acute heart failure? How can new biomarkers help in the treatment of heart failure, and when and how should BNP be measured in heart failure patients? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, to apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients to result in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17245481 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation care: challenges in clinical practice and educational needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136937
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):98-104
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Suzanne Murray
Patrice Lazure
Carolyn Pullen
Paule Maltais
Paul Dorian
Author Affiliation
AXDEV Group Inc., Brossard, Québec, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):98-104
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Canada
Cardiology - education
Catheter Ablation
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Medical, Continuing
Emergency Medicine - education
Evidence-Based Medicine
Family Practice - education
Female
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Male
Middle Aged
Neurology - education
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
Current debates around the choice of management strategy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) combined with limited efficacy and frequent adverse effects of current pharmacotherapies cause uncertainty and confusion, challenging optimal care delivery to AF patients.
To determine gaps in knowledge, skill, and competencies of Canadian physicians caring for patients with AF as well as underlying causes of these gaps.
A mixed-method approach --consisting of qualitative (semistructured interviews) and quantitative data collection techniques (online survey) --was conducted. Findings were triangulated to ensure the reliability and trustworthiness of findings. The combined sample (n = 161) included 43 family physicians/general practitioners, 23 internal medicine specialists, 48 cardiologists, 28 emergency physicians, 14 neurologists, and 5 patients.
Gaps and barriers impeding optimal care were related to an unclear definition of AF, uncertainty of its pathophysiology, and knowledge gaps across the care continuum, including screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Clinical decision-making, individualized patient therapy, communication with patients and between professionals, and application of guidelines were found to be particularly challenging. These issues are discussed in the context of the newly revised Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) AF Guidelines.
Educational gaps exist across the entire continuum of care. Results from this study, along with the 2011 CCS guidelines for AF management, provide direction for solutions through physician education and professional development.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):388
PubMed ID
21329867 View in PubMed
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Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: prevention and treatment of atrial fibrillation following cardiac surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136938
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):91-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
L Brent Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Alberta Health Services and University of Calgary, Foothills Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. brent.mitchell@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):91-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Amiodarone - adverse effects - contraindications - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects - contraindications - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - etiology - prevention & control
Atrial Flutter - drug therapy - etiology - prevention & control
Canada
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial
Drug Therapy, Combination
Evidence-Based Medicine
Heart Diseases - surgery
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Length of Stay
Magnesium Sulfate - therapeutic use
Postoperative Complications - drug therapy - etiology - prevention & control
Premedication
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Postoperative atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (POAF) are the most common complications of cardiac surgery that require intervention or prolong intensive care unit and total hospital stay. For some patients, these tachyarrhythmias have important consequences including patient discomfort/anxiety, hemodynamic deterioration, cognitive impairment, thromboembolic events including stroke, exposure to the risks of antiarrhythmic treatments, longer hospital stay, and increased health care costs. We conclude that prevention of POAF is a worthwhile exercise and recommend that the dominant therapy for this purpose be ß-blocker therapy, especially the continuation of ß-blocker therapy that is already in place. When ß-blocker therapy is contraindicated, amiodarone prophylaxis is recommended. If both of these therapies are contraindicated, therapy with either intravenous magnesium or biatrial pacing is suggested. Patients at high risk of POAF may be considered for first-line amiodarone therapy, first-line sotalol therapy, or combination prophylactic therapy. The treatment of POAF may follow either a rate-control approach (with the dominant therapy being ß-blocking drugs) or a rhythm-control approach. Anticoagulation should be considered if persistent POAF lasts >72 hours and at the point of hospital discharge. The ongoing need for any POAF treatment (including anticoagulation) should be reconsidered 6-12 weeks after the surgical procedure.
PubMed ID
21329866 View in PubMed
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