Skip header and navigation

Refine By

74 records – page 1 of 8.

Ten-Item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10): Measurement invariance and cross-cultural validation across seven language-based samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299108
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2019 Feb; 33(1):91-103
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Orsolya Király
Beáta Bothe
Jano Ramos-Diaz
Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar
Katerina Lukavska
Ondrej Hrabec
Michal Miovsky
Joël Billieux
Jory Deleuze
Filip Nuyens
Laurent Karila
Mark D Griffiths
Katalin Nagygyörgy
Róbert Urbán
Marc N Potenza
Daniel L King
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf
Natacha Carragher
Zsolt Demetrovics
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology.
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2019 Feb; 33(1):91-103
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Australia
Behavior, Addictive - diagnosis
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Czech Republic
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Hungary
Impulsive Behavior
Internet
Iran
Italy
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Peru
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Republic of Korea
Research Design
Slovakia
Slovenia
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
United States
Video Games
Young Adult
Abstract
The Ten-Item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10) is a short screening instrument developed to assess Internet gaming disorder (IGD) as proposed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of MentalDisorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), adopting a concise, clear, and consistent item-wording. According to initial studies conducted in 2014, the instrument showed promising psychometric characteristics. The present study tested the psychometric properties, including language and gender invariance, in a large international sample of online gamers. In this study, data were collected from 7,193 participants comprising Hungarian (n = 3,924), Iranian (n = 791), English-speaking (n = 754), French-speaking (n = 421), Norwegian (n = 195), Czech (n = 496), and Peruvian (n = 612) online gamers via gaming-related websites and gaming-related social-networking-site groups. A unidimensional factor structure provided a good fit to the data in all language-based samples. In addition, results indicated both language and gender invariance on the level of scalar invariance. Criterion and construct validity of the IGDT-10 was supported by its strong association with the Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire and moderate association with weekly gaming time, psychopathological symptoms, and impulsivity. The proportions of each sample that met the cut-off score on the IGDT-10 varied between 1.61% and 4.48% in the individual samples, except for the Peruvian sample (13.44%). The IGDT-10 shows robust psychometric properties and appears suitable for conducting cross-cultural and gender comparisons across seven languages. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30589307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal snuff use and cotinine in late pregnancy-A validation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299165
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Nov; 97(11):1373-1380
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Anna Gunnerbeck
Pauline Raaschou
Sven Cnattingius
Anna-Karin Edstedt Bonamy
Ronny Wickström
Author Affiliation
Neuropediatric Unit, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Nov; 97(11):1373-1380
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - urine
Cotinine - urine
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Registries
Self Report
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Use - epidemiology - metabolism
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
Oral moist snuff is widely used in Sweden including during pregnancy. Maternal snuff use has been associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes in epidemiological studies. Self-reported maternal snuff use has not been validated previously. The main objective of this study was to validate self-reported snuff use in pregnancy in a prospective cohort study and in the Medical Birth Register.
A prospective Swedish cohort study, 2005-2011, in which 572 women were asked to participate. Of 474 recruited women, 381 non-smokers (263 snuff users and 118 non-tobacco users) were included in the main analyses. Participants prospectively reported snuff use through questionnaires. Medical Birth Register data on the participants was obtained. Maternal urine cotinine was collected in late pregnancy and was used as a biomarker.
Cotinine levels in maternal urine confirmed a high validity of self-reported snuff use through questionnaires in late pregnancy; sensitivity and specificity values were 98% and 96%, respectively. In the Medical Birth Register, 45% of the snuff users were misclassified as nonusers in late pregnancy. There were significant differences in median cotinine levels between users of mini pouches and users of standard pouches, but there was a great difference of cotinine levels among users with similar number of pouches used daily.
Self-reported snuff use through questionnaires has high validity. In the Medical Birth Register, in late pregnancy, many snuff users were misclassified as nonusers. As a consequence, there is a risk of underestimating the harmful effects of snuff use when using late pregnancy Medical Birth Register data.
PubMed ID
29900536 View in PubMed
Less detail

Constructing content validity of clinical nurse specialist core competencies: exploratory sequential mixed-method study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299343
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Dec; 32(4):1428-1436
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Krista Jokiniemi
Riitta Meretoja
Anna-Maija Pietilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Dec; 32(4):1428-1436
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Female
Finland
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Clinicians - standards
Nurse Specialists - standards
Nurse's Role
United States
Abstract
The demand to increase nursing competence is brought on by the requirement of safe, accessible and more effective use of healthcare provider expertise. Clinical nurse specialist competency development dates back to the late 20th century; however, an examination of the literature reveals a lack of research and discussion to support the competency development.
To describe the formulation and validation process of the clinical nurse specialist core competencies.
Exploratory sequential mixed-method design.
This mixed-method study, conducted between 2013 and 2017 in Finland, involved four phases: I) a Policy Delphi study (n = 25, n = 22, n = 19); II) cross-mapping of preliminary competency criteria against international competency sets; III) content validity study of expanded competency criteria (n = 7, n = 10); and IV) verification of competency criteria with practicing CNSs (n = 16). Data were analysed by both qualitative and quantitative analysis methods.
Seventy-four preliminary clinical nurse competency criteria were formulated in the first phase of the study. Through cross-mapping the competencies against the US and Canadian clinical nurse specialist competency sets, they were further concised to 61 criteria. The examination of Content Validity Indexes and experts' comments led to the clarification and consequent inclusion of 50 criteria to the final scale, with Scale Content Validity Index Average of 0.94. The competency criteria were evaluated to be a solid set with potential to clarify and uniform the clinical nurse specialist roles.
Through a rigorous research process, validated clinical nurse specialist competency criteria were formed with a high Scale Content Validity Index Average. The results allude to the potential of formulating international competency criteria to support global role clarity and understanding. However, further research is needed to validate the content and construct of the formulated competencies with a larger population across countries.
PubMed ID
29963720 View in PubMed
Less detail

Work addiction is associated with increased stress and reduced quality of life: Validation of the Bergen Work Addiction Scale in Danish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299442
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2019 Apr; 60(2):145-151
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Mia Beck Lichtenstein
Maiken Malkenes
Christian Sibbersen
Cecilie Juul Hinze
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2019 Apr; 60(2):145-151
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Behavior, Addictive - complications - diagnosis
Denmark
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation - standards
Quality of Life - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - etiology
Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Addiction to work is defined as a compulsion or an uncontrollable need to work incessantly. Only few measures exist to identify work addiction and the health consequences are sparsely explored. The Bergen Workaholic Scale (BWAS) measures seven core elements of work addiction and has been used in Norway, Hungary, Brazil, Italy, USA and Poland. The aim of this study was to validate the BWAS in a Danish sample and to investigate if high risk of work addiction was associated with stress and reduced quality of life. We conducted an online screening survey with 671 participants aged 16-68 years with the Danish translation of the BWAS. We added the perceived stress scale (PSS) and the quality of life scale EQ-5D-5L. Those with high risk of work addiction reported significantly higher mean PSS scores (20.0 points) compared to those with low risk of addiction (12.5 points) and poorer quality of life (61.9) compared to the low risk group (81.3). Furthermore, work addiction was associated with more weekly working hours (44.0 vs. 35.6 hours/week) and having more leadership responsibility. A preliminary estimate of work addiction prevalence was 6.6%. The BWAS demonstrated good reliability (a = 0.83), and factor analyses pointed at a single factor structure. Work addiction seems to be associated with health problems in terms of stress and poorer quality of life. The BWAS is recommended as a reliable and valid tool to identify work addiction in Danish.
PubMed ID
30615193 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299507
Source
Burns. 2018 08; 44(5):1159-1166
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
08-2018
Author
Islam Abdelrahman
Moustafa Elmasry
Mats Fredrikson
Ingrid Steinvall
Author Affiliation
Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt; Department of Hand Surgery, Plastic Surgery and Burns, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: islam.abdelrahman@liu.se.
Source
Burns. 2018 08; 44(5):1159-1166
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bandages - economics
Body surface area
Burn Units
Burns - economics - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography - economics
Female
Hospital Costs
Humans
Infant
Infusions, Parenteral - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - economics
Referral and Consultation
Respiration, Artificial - economics
Retrospective Studies
Skin Transplantation - economics
Survival Rate
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation). We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000-15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score. We retrieved 22301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p
PubMed ID
29475745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a language screening instrument for Swedish 4-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299761
Source
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2018 05; 53(3):605-614
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies
Date
05-2018
Author
Ann Lavesson
Martin Lövdén
Kristina Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2018 05; 53(3):605-614
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Communication Disorders - diagnosis
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Language Development Disorders - diagnosis
Language Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods
ROC Curve
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Program for health surveillance of preschool children includes screening of language and communication abilities. One important language screening is carried out at age 4 years as part of a general screening conducted by health nurses at child health centres. The instruments presently in use for this screening mainly focus on expressive phonology. This may result in both over-referral of children with phonological difficulties and under-referral of children with language disorders (LDs), involving difficulties with vocabulary, grammar and/or language comprehension. Previous research has proposed non-word repetition as a clinical marker for LD. It has also been found that higher predictive power is achieved when non-word repetition is combined with the assessment of lexical/semantic skills. Taking these findings into account, the construction of a language screening instrument may yield more adequate referrals to speech-language therapists (SLTs).
To construct a new standardized language screening instrument for 4-year-olds and to test its properties.
An instrument was developed and revised after piloting. A population of 352 children was screened at the regular 4-year check-up by 11 health nurses. The final sample consisted of 328 children aged 46-53 months (23% multilingual). Children performing below a preliminary cut-off were referred to an SLT (n = 52). Five SLTs carried out an assessment on average within 5 weeks using a gold standard language test battery. Children who screened negatively were followed up with a parent questionnaire at age 5;6.
Thirty-one true-positives and 11 false-positives were identified after SLT assessment. A further six children were identified as false-negatives (two through referral to an SLT and four through parent questionnaire at age 5;6). A receiver-operating characteristics curve with a C statistic of .94 was calculated. Based on optimal cut-off, the sensitivity of the screening instrument was found to be .84, and specificity was .96. Multilingual children performed similar to monolingual children; boys performed significantly lower than girls; and children with a family history of language-related problems performed lower than those without. Interrater reliability was high, as was Cronbach's alpha.
The screening instrument seems sufficiently valid for its purpose to identify children who need further assessment by an SLT. A follow-up study including SLT assessment for all children to check for false-negatives would be interesting in future, as would studies comparing results from the 4-year screening with those from earlier screens.
PubMed ID
29411470 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of health literacy among older Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299832
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Johanna Eronen
Leena Paakkari
Erja Portegijs
Milla Saajanaho
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Jyvaskyla, Finland. johanna.eronen@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Focus Groups
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the feasibility of the HLS-EU-Q16 (in Finnish) for use among older Finns and whether the health literacy score correlates with indicators of health and functioning.
To determine the feasibility of the instrument, we first conducted a focus group discussion with nine participants. For the quantitative analyses, we used data from the AGNES cohort study, collected between October 2017 and April 2018 at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. 292 75-year-old Finnish men and women were interviewed face-to-face in their homes. Health literacy was measured with the HLS-EU-Q16 and health literacy score, ranging from 0 to 50, computed. The reproducibility of the instrument was test-retested. Chi-square tests were used to compare health literacy scores between participants by different socioeconomic variables, and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to study the associations of health literacy with cognition, depressive symptoms, chronic conditions, life-space mobility and physical performance.
The mean health literacy score for all participants was 35.05 (SD 6.32). Participants who rated their financial situation and self-rated health as very good had the highest health literacy scores (38.85, SD 5.09 and 39.22, SD 6.77, respectively). Better health literacy was associated with better cognitive status, fewer depressive symptoms and chronic conditions, higher life-space mobility and better physical performance.
The HLS-EU-Q16 is a feasible measure for research purposes among older Finns. The associations between health literacy and indicators of health and functioning need to be more closely investigated in larger samples with a wider age-range.
PubMed ID
30578457 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-Validation of Arthroplasty Records Between Arthroplasty and Hospital Discharge Registers, Self-Reports, and Medical Records Among a Cohort of 14,220 Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299873
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2018 12; 33(12):3649-3654
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies
Date
12-2018
Author
Ville Turppo
Reijo Sund
Joonas Sirola
Heikki Kröger
Jukka Huopio
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2018 12; 33(12):3649-3654
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Knee Joint
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Self Report - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
There are no actual validation studies of the Finnish Arthroplasty Register (FAR), and only a few studies about the accuracy of self-reported hip and knee arthroplasty exist. Therefore, we examine how reliably total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasties can be identified from multiple data sources, including self-reports, the hospital discharge register, the arthroplasty register, and medical records.
Data from the FAR and from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register (FHDR) during the years 1980-2010 were cross-checked to identify all THA and TKA events for the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study cohort (n = 14,220). Unclear events were further checked from the medical records. After establishing a gold standard, by referring to confirmed THAs and TKAs, we examined the validity of self-reports in identifying the prevalent population with THA/TKA and in identifying incident THA/TKA.
Completeness of 2820 total arthroplasty events was 96.1% in FAR and 98.3% in FHDR. The self-reports had 95.1% sensitivity and 92.9% positive predictive value (PPV) to identify population with THA and for TKA sensitivity was 94.6% and PPV 95.2%. Self-reports' sensitivity of finding the actual surgery events was 65.3% and PPV 85.4% for THA and for TKA sensitivity was 62.9% and PPV 83.4%.
The best way to identify THAs and TKAs in Finland is to combine data from the FAR and the FHDR. Self-reports can be considered as suitable to identify the prevalent population with THA/TKA, and they do not work as well to identify the actual surgery events.
PubMed ID
30193880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Measuring care transitions in Sweden: validation of the care transitions measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295277
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2018 May 01; 30(4):291-297
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
May-01-2018
Author
Maria Flink
Mesfin Tessma
Milada Cvancarova Småstuen
Marléne Lindblad
Eric A Coleman
Mirjam Ekstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management, and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägaen 18A, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2018 May 01; 30(4):291-297
Date
May-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Care Surveys - standards
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Patient Transfer - standards
Psychometrics
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
To translate and assess the validity and reliability of the original American Care Transitions Measure, both the 15-item and the shortened 3-item versions, in a sample of people in transition from hospital to home within Sweden.
Translation of survey items, evaluation of psychometric properties.
Ten surgical and medical wards at five hospitals in Sweden.
Patients discharged from surgical and medical wards.
Psychometric properties of the Swedish versions of the 15-item (CTM-15) and the 3-item (CTM-3) Care Transition Measure.
We compared the fit of nine models among a sample of 194 Swedish patients. Cronbach's alpha was 0.946 for CTM-15 and 0.74 for CTM-3. The model indices for CTM-15 and CTM-3 were strongly indicative of inferior goodness-of-fit between the hypothesized one-factor model and the sample data. A multidimensional three-factor model revealed a better fit compared with CTM-15 and CTM-3 one factor models. The one-factor solution, representing 4 items (CTM-4), showed an acceptable fit of the data, and was far superior to the one-factor CTM-15 and CTM-3 and the three-factor multidimensional models. The Cronbach's alpha for CTM-4 was 0.85.
CTM-15 with multidimensional three-factor model was a better model than both CTM-15 and CTM-3 one-factor models. CTM-4 is a valid and reliable measure of care transfer among patients in medical and surgical wards in Sweden. It seems the Swedish CTM is best represented by the short Swedish version (CTM-4) unidimensional construct.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2013 Jan 23;309(4):364-71 PMID 23340638
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Aug;18(8):646-51 PMID 12911647
Cites: BMJ Qual Saf. 2012 Dec;21 Suppl 1:i39-49 PMID 23118410
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2016 Jul;31(7):732-8 PMID 26868279
Cites: Value Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;8(2):94-104 PMID 15804318
Cites: Int J Integr Care. 2002;2:e02 PMID 16896392
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;60(1):34-42 PMID 17161752
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 2;360(14):1418-28 PMID 19339721
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 Apr 22;173(8):624-9 PMID 23529278
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Aug 05;10(8):e0128329 PMID 26244494
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Oct 15;5(10):e008708 PMID 26474939
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2009 Apr;21(2):97-102 PMID 19196739
Cites: J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2006 May-Jun;33(3):281-9; quiz 290-1 PMID 16717518
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Apr;51(4):556-7 PMID 12657079
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1990 Mar;107(2):238-46 PMID 2320703
Cites: J Am Heart Assoc. 2014 Jun 04;3(3):e001053 PMID 24901109
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2011 Sep;82(3):412-23 PMID 21957699
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2017 Oct 1;29(6):752-768 PMID 29025093
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Feb 4;138(3):161-7 PMID 12558354
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2012 Nov 28-Dec 4;109(48):2211-5 PMID 23330527
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 Feb 3;170(3):345-9 PMID 14757670
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012 Aug 16;12:256 PMID 22897804
Cites: Musculoskeletal Care. 2014 Mar;12(1):13-21 PMID 23300145
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Mar;43(3):246-55 PMID 15725981
Cites: J Hosp Med. 2010 Sep;5(7):385-91 PMID 20578045
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 May 22;10(5):e0127403 PMID 26000708
PubMed ID
29432554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of Self-Reported Birth Weight: Results from a Norwegian Twin Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289613
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 10; 20(5):406-413
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Validation Studies
Date
10-2017
Author
Thomas S Nilsen
Julia Kutschke
Ingunn Brandt
Jennifer R Harris
Author Affiliation
Department for Cohort Studies,Norwegian Institute of Public Health,Oslo,Norway.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 10; 20(5):406-413
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Self Report
Twins
Abstract
The association between birth weight and later life outcomes is of considerable interest in life-course epidemiology. Research often relies on self-reported measures of birth weight, and its validity is consequently of importance. We assessed agreement between self-reported birth weight and official birth records for Norwegian twins born 1967-1974. The intraclass correlation between self-reported birth weight and register-based birth weight was 0.91 in our final sample of 363 twins. It could be expected that 95% of self-reported birth-weight values will deviate from official records within a maximum of +446 grams and a minimum of -478 grams - around a mean deviation of 16 grams. Self-reported birth weight had a sensitivity of 0.78-0.89 and a positive predictive value of 0.59-0.85, and an overall weighted kappa of 0.71. We further assessed agreement by conducting two linear regression models where we respectively regressed self-reported birth weight and register-based birth weight on adult body mass index, a known association. The two models were not significantly different; however, there were different levels of significance in parameter estimates that warrant some caution in using self-reported birth weight. Reliability of self-reported birth weight was also assessed, based on self-reports in another sample of twins born 1935-1960 who had reported their birth weight in two questionnaires 34 years apart. The intraclass correlation was 0.86, which indicates a high degree of reliability. In conclusion, self-reported birth weight, depending on context and age when birth weight was reported, can be cautiously used.
PubMed ID
28868992 View in PubMed
Less detail

74 records – page 1 of 8.