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Familial risk of venous thromboembolism in first-, second- and third-degree relatives: a nationwide family study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116917
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;109(3):458-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Bengt Zöller
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University/Region Skåne, CRC, building 28, floor 11, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Skåne University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. bengt.zoller@med.lu.se
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;109(3):458-63
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden
Thrombophilia - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) clusters in families, but the familial risk of VTE has only been determined in first-degree relatives. This nationwide study aimed to determine the familial risk of VTE in first-, second- and third-degree relatives of affected individuals. The Swedish Multi-Generation Register was linked to Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1987-2009. This was a case-cohort study. Odds ratios (ORs) for VTE were calculated for individuals whose relatives were hospitalised for VTE, as determined by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), and those whose relatives were unaffected by VTE. The familial OR for VTE was 2.49 in siblings (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.40-2.58), 2.65 in children (2.50-2.80), 2.09 in parents (2.03-2.15), 1.52 in maternal half-siblings (1.26-1.85), 2.34 in paternal half-siblings (2.00-2.73), 1.69 in nieces/nephews (1.57-1.82), 1.47 in cousins (1.33-1.64), and 1.14 in spouses of individuals diagnosed with VTE (1.09-1.18). Familial clustering was stronger at young ages. The familial transmission was slightly stronger for males compared with females but was only significant for siblings 1.13 (1.05-1.22) and parents 1.11 (1.05-1.78) of probands. The present data showing an increased VTE risk among not only first-degree relatives but also second- and third-degree relatives indicate that the genetic component of the familial clustering of VTE is strong. Family history is a potentially useful genetic surrogate marker for clinical VTE risk assessment, even in second- and third degree-relatives.
Notes
Comment In: Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;109(3):361-223348243
Erratum In: Thromb Haemost. 2013 Jul 1;110(1):204
PubMed ID
23348971 View in PubMed
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Early-term birth (37-38 weeks) and mortality in young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117067
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Mar;24(2):270-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Casey Crump
Kristina Sundquist
Marilyn A Winkleby
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. kccrump@stanford.edu
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Mar;24(2):270-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Term Birth
Abstract
Early-term birth (gestational age, 37-38 weeks) has been associated with increased infant mortality relative to later-term birth, but mortality beyond infancy has not been studied. We examined the association between early-term birth and mortality through young adulthood.
We conducted a national cohort study of 679,981 singleton births in Sweden in 1973-1979, followed up for all-cause and cause-specific mortality through 2008 (ages 29-36 years).
There were 10,656 deaths in 21.5 million person-years of follow-up. Among those still alive at the beginning of each age range, early-term birth relative to those born at 39-42 weeks was associated with increased mortality in the neonatal period (0-27 days: adjusted hazard ratio = 2.18 [95% confidence interval = 1.89-2.51]), postneonatal period (28-364 days: 1.66 [1.44-1.92]), early childhood (1-5 years: 1.29 [1.10-1.51]), and young adulthood (18-36 years: 1.14 [1.05-1.24]), but not in late childhood/adolescence (6-17 years: 0.97 [0.84-1.12]). In young adulthood, early-term birth was strongly associated with death from congenital anomalies and endocrine disorders, especially diabetes (2.89 [1.54-5.43]).
In this large national cohort study, early-term birth was independently associated with increased mortality in infancy, early childhood, and young adulthood. Lowest short-term and long-term mortality was among those born at 39-42 weeks.
PubMed ID
23337240 View in PubMed
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Common cancers share familial susceptibility: implications for cancer genetics and counselling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286911
Source
J Med Genet. 2017 Apr;54(4):248-253
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Hongyao Yu
Christoph Frank
Jan Sundquist
Akseli Hemminki
Kari Hemminki
Source
J Med Genet. 2017 Apr;54(4):248-253
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Family
Female
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It has been proposed that cancer is more common in some families than in others, but the hypothesis lacks population level support. We use a novel approach by studying any cancers in large three-generation families and thus are able to find risks even though penetrance is low.
Individuals in the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database were organised in three generations and the relative risk (RR) of cancer was calculated to the persons in the third generation by the numbers of patients with cancer in generations 1, 2 and 3.
The RRs for any cancer in generation 3 increased by the numbers of affected relatives, reaching 1.61 when at least seven relatives were diagnosed. The median patient had two affected relatives, and 7.0% had five or more affected relatives with an RR of 1.46, which translated to an absolute risk of 21.5% compared with 14.7% in population by age 65 years. For prostate cancer, the RR was 2.85 with four or more affected family members with any cancer, and it increased to 14.42 with four or more concordant cancers in family members. RRs for prostate cancer were approximately equal (2.70 vs 2.85) if a man had one relative with prostate cancer or four or more relatives diagnosed with any cancer.
A strong family history of cancer, regardless of tumour type, increases cancer risk of family members and calls for mechanistic explanations. Our data provide tools for counselling of patients with cancer with both low and high familiar risks.
PubMed ID
27651446 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular fitness in young males and risk of unprovoked venous thromboembolism in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287532
Source
Ann Med. 2017 Mar;49(2):176-184
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Bengt Zöller
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Ann Med. 2017 Mar;49(2):176-184
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cardiorespiratory Fitness - physiology
Cohort Studies
Exercise - physiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Whether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. The present study aims to determine whether high cardiovascular fitness reduces the risk of VTE.
A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n?=?773,925) born in 1954-1970 with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972-1990) until 2010. Data on cardiovascular fitness using a cycle ergonometric test (maximal aerobic workload in Watt [Wmax]) at conscription were linked with national hospital register data and the Multi-Generation Register. We identified all full-siblings and first-cousin pairs discordant for maximal aerobic workload. This co-relative design allows for adjustment for familial resemblance.
In total, 3005 (0.39%) males were affected by VTE. Cardiovascular fitness estimated with Wmax was not associated with VTE risk when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). However, cardiovascular fitness estimated with Wmax/kg and adjusted for BMI was associated with reduced risk for VTE (Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-0.85 per standard deviation compared with mean Wmax/kg). The association was weaker over time and also when examining discordant first cousins and full-sibling pairs.
These results suggest that there is a relationship between cardiovascular fitness and weight that is important for future VTE risk. Key messages Whether high cardiovascular fitness is associated with reduced risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. A Swedish cohort of male conscripts (n = 773,925) tested with a cycle ergometric test with no history of previous VTE were followed from enlistment (1972-1990) until 2010. Cardiovascular fitness estimated with Wmax/kg and adjusted for BMI was associated with reduced risk for VTE (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.78-0.85). These results suggest that there is a relationship between cardiovascular fitness and weight that is important for future VTE risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27764967 View in PubMed
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Neighborhood Deprivation and Risk of Age-Related Eye Diseases: A Follow-up Study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271717
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2015;22(5):308-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tsuyoshi Hamano
Xinjun Li
Masaki Tanito
Toru Nabika
Kuninori Shiwaku
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2015;22(5):308-20
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cataract - epidemiology
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Glaucoma - epidemiology
Humans
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine whether there is an association between neighborhood deprivation and age-related eye diseases, particularly macular degeneration, cataract, diabetes-related eye complications, and glaucoma.
The study population comprised a nationwide sample of 2,060,887 men and 2,250,851 women aged 40 years or older living in Sweden who were followed from 1 January 2000 until the first hospitalization/outpatient registration for age-related eye disease during the study period, death, emigration, or the end of the study period on 31 December 2010. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate the association between neighborhood deprivation and age-related eye diseases.
In men, the odds ratio (OR) for age-related eye diseases for those living in high-deprivation neighborhoods compared to those living in low-deprivation neighborhoods remained significant after adjustment for potential confounding factors (macular degeneration, OR 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.12; cataract, OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.26-1.35; diabetes-related eye complications, OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.30-1.43; glaucoma, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.06-1.15). In women, similar patterns were observed (macular degeneration, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.07-1.15; cataract, OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.31-1.40; diabetes-related eye complications, OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.42-1.59; glaucoma, OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.08-1.17).
Our results suggest that neighborhood deprivation is associated with age-related eye diseases in both men and women. These results implicate that individual- as well as neighborhood-level factors are important for preventing age-related eye diseases.
Notes
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Comment In: Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2015;22(5):295-626395656
PubMed ID
26395658 View in PubMed
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Contribution of shared environmental factors to familial aggregation of common cancers: an adoption study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267794
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2015 Mar;24(2):162-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Jianguang Ji
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2015 Mar;24(2):162-4
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer runs in families, suggesting a heritable component, but the contribution of environmental factors cannot be neglected. Studies on spousal risk can partly disentangle the environmental contribution but miss shared environmental factors during childhood and adolescence. Here, we examined the familial aggregation of common cancers among 80,281 Swedish-born adoptees, identified from the national Swedish Multigeneration Register, and linked them to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for common cancers (colorectal, lung, breast, prostate, and skin cancers) in the adoptees whose adoptive parents were diagnosed with concordant cancers, compared with the general population. SIRs in adoptees with an affected adoptive parent ranged from 1.00 (breast cancer) to 1.28 (skin cancer), whereas the SIRs in nonadoptees with an affected parent ranged from 1.63 (colorectal cancer) to 2.12 (skin cancer). Environmental factors account for around 0-28% of the familial aggregation. Cancer sites with high environmental contributions were observed for skin and colorectal cancers, which are known to have strong environmental causes.
PubMed ID
25415834 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal trends in good self-rated health: effects of age and birth cohort in a 25-year follow-up study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268359
Source
Int J Public Health. 2015 Mar;60(3):363-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Sven-Erik Johansson
Patrik Midlöv
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Susanna Calling
Source
Int J Public Health. 2015 Mar;60(3):363-73
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Self Report
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although average life expectancy has increased considerably in Sweden, there is less evidence for improved self-rated health (SRH). We analyzed longitudinal trends in SRH between 1980/1981 and 2004/2005 in age and birth cohort subgroups.
2,728 males and 2,770 females, aged 16-71 years, were interviewed every eighth year. Mixed models with random intercepts were used to estimate changes in SRH within different age groups and birth cohorts, adjusting for potential confounders.
During the 25-year follow-up, SRH improved in individuals aged =48 years, but became poorer or was unchanged in those aged 16-47 years. All birth cohorts showed poorer SRH with increasing age, with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.94 (0.93-0.95) in males and 0.92 (0.91-0.93) in females.
While SRH in the older age groups improved, SRH became poorer in the youngest. Poorer SRH is deeply worrying for the affected individuals, and may also have a negative impact on the health care system. Although mental illness, socioeconomic factors, and lifestyle may be potential mechanisms, future studies are needed to investigate the reasons behind this trend.
PubMed ID
25650292 View in PubMed
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A description of some aspects of the triangular meeting between immigrant patients, their interpreters and GPs in primary health care in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148867
Source
Fam Pract. 2009 Oct;26(5):377-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Eivor Wiking
Nouha Saleh-Stattin
Sven-Erik Johansson
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
CeFAM/Center for Family and Community Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. eivorwiking@swipnet.se
Source
Fam Pract. 2009 Oct;26(5):377-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Emigrants and Immigrants
Humans
Language
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Little is known about what immigrant patients, interpreters and GPs who have participated in the same consultation experience during these consultations or their reflections about these experiences. Previous studies have focused on the patient's, the interpreter's or the GP's perspective or a combination of two perspectives.
The first aim was to describe some aspects of each of the three perspectives in the triangular meeting between immigrant patients, interpreters and GPs, including their experiences, reflections and interactions during the consultation in primary health care. The second aim was to analyse patients' satisfaction with the consultation; whether satisfaction is influenced by respect for patients' culture, personality and wishes; and whether interpreters or GPs experience any ethical conflicts during the consultation.
Using questionnaires, all three categories were asked about their opinions regarding the communication, their experiences and reflections during the consultation and the patient's satisfaction. The interpreters and GPs were asked about ethical conflicts.
Of the 182 respondents, 52 were patients, 65 GPs and 65 interpreters. A matched group of answers from patients, GPs and interpreters was present in 40 consultations. Eighteen of the patients experienced language difficulties. Twenty-six experienced respect for their culture; 32, respect for their personality; and 33, respect for their wishes. Ethical conflicts were rare. All three categories reported that the majority of patients were satisfied with the consultation.
Professional interpreters are important for both a correct verbal and a cultural interpretation. Patient-centred communication is of key importance to a successful consultation.
PubMed ID
19713217 View in PubMed
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Risk of transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder in first- and second-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96717
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2010 Jul;19(4):275-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
Jan Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
aDivision of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. m.mousavi@dkfz.de
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2010 Jul;19(4):275-9
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Environmental risk factors, particularly tobacco smoking, are important for transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder. Studies in migrants may provide valuable insight into the environmental and genetic etiology of cancer. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for transitional-cell carcinoma among the immigrants compared with native Swedes. SIRs for lung cancer were also calculated as a proxy for smoking prevalence. Significantly decreased risks of bladder cancer were observed for male (SIR=0.89) and female (0.71) Finns and male East Asian (0.39) first-generation immigrants. Male immigrants from many countries showed increased risks, ranging from 1.18 to 2.29. Only female immigrants from Denmark (1.40) and Norway (1.27) had increased risks. The risks for bladder and lung cancers correlated, except for Finnish and Iranian men. The sons of immigrants born in high-risk countries had an increased SIR (1.51) whereas the daughters of immigrants born in low-risk countries had a decreased risk (0.32). The risk in the second-generation immigrants born in Sweden was equal to that of natives. In conclusion, the observed bladder cancer risks in the first-generation immigrants, the changes in risks in the second-generation immigrants, and the covariation of the risk patterns of bladder and lung cancers suggested a main contribution by tobacco smoking. The exceptional patterns among the Finns and Iranians may point to the existence of modifying factors. The changes in incidence in second-generation immigrants, yet based on small case numbers, lend little support to the involvement of genetic factors.
PubMed ID
20535860 View in PubMed
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Risk of cancer following hospitalization for type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96948
Source
Oncologist. 2010;15(6):548-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. k.hemminki@dkfz.de
Source
Oncologist. 2010;15(6):548-55
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Cancer and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two common diseases that may share risk factors. We aimed at determining subsequent cancer risks in patients hospitalized for T2D in Sweden. METHODS: T2D patients were obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register; cancers were recorded from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for cancer following last hospitalization for T2D. The comparison group was the general Swedish population. RESULTS: The number of hospitalized T2D patients from 1964 to 2007 was 125,126, of whom 26,641 had an affected family member. Altogether 24 cancers showed an elevated risk when follow-up was started after the last hospitalization. The highest SIRs were for pancreatic (6.08) and liver (4.25) cancers. The incidences of these cancers were even elevated when follow-up was started 5 years after the last hospitalization for T2D, with primary liver cancer showing the highest SIR of 4.66. Also increased were the incidences of upper aerodigestive tract, esophageal, colon, rectal, pancreatic, lung, cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and kidney cancers. Prostate cancer showed a lower risk. Familial T2D patients showed no exceptional elevated cancer risks but their prostate cancer and melanoma risks were lower. CONCLUSIONS: This study, covering approximately one half of Swedish T2D patients, showed an elevated risk for several cancers after hospitalization for T2D, probably indicating the profound metabolic disturbances of the underlying disease. The highest risks were found for liver and pancreatic cancers. No excess cancer risks were observed in familial diabetics. The lower risk for prostate cancer remains intriguing.
PubMed ID
20479278 View in PubMed
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341 records – page 1 of 35.