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Lower conditioning leisure-time physical activity in young adults born preterm at very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126513
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32430
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Nina Kaseva
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Minna Salonen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Katri Räikkönen
Tuija Tammelin
Petteri Hovi
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Sture Andersson
Johan G Eriksson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease and Diabetes Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. nina.kaseva@fimnet.fi
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32430
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Models, Statistical
Motor Activity
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW,
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early growth and coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes: findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (HBCS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134179
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1799S-1802S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. johan.eriksson@helsinki.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1799S-1802S
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Birth weight
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Size
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Insulin Resistance
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
A slow rate of intrauterine growth is a major risk factor for several common noncommunicable diseases, which include the following: coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Likewise, growth patterns in infancy and childhood have been identified as important factors linked to the pathogenesis of these disorders. In this overview, patterns of growth associated with CHD, type 2 diabetes, and related metabolic traits in adult life are presented on the basis of findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (HBCS) 1934-1944. Later risk of CHD was associated with small body size at birth and during infancy, followed by an increase in body size later in childhood. This pattern of growth has been associated with dyslipidemia in later life, which offers an explanation for the observed findings. Type 2 diabetes and CHD share several risk factors. The early growth of persons who later develop type 2 diabetes includes a small body size at birth as well as a small body size during infancy. An early age at adiposity rebound was associated with a markedly increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. The patterns of growth associated with type 2 diabetes are also associated with alterations in body composition, which predisposes to insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. The presented findings suggest that to be able to understand the pathogenesis of several noncommunicable diseases, the diseases need to be studied from a life-course perspective, and prenatal and childhood growth as well as adult characteristics need to be taken into account.
PubMed ID
21613556 View in PubMed
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High risk population isolate reveals low frequency variants predisposing to intracranial aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105063
Source
PLoS Genet. 2014 Jan;10(1):e1004134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Mitja I Kurki
Emília Ilona Gaál
Johannes Kettunen
Tuuli Lappalainen
Androniki Menelaou
Verneri Anttila
Femke N G van 't Hof
Mikael von Und Zu Fraunberg
Seppo Helisalmi
Mikko Hiltunen
Hanna Lehto
Aki Laakso
Riku Kivisaari
Timo Koivisto
Antti Ronkainen
Jaakko Rinne
Lambertus A L Kiemeney
Sita H Vermeulen
Mari A Kaunisto
Johan G Eriksson
Arpo Aromaa
Markus Perola
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli T Raitakari
Veikko Salomaa
Murat Gunel
Emmanouil T Dermitzakis
Ynte M Ruigrok
Gabriel J E Rinkel
Mika Niemelä
Juha Hernesniemi
Samuli Ripatti
Paul I W de Bakker
Aarno Palotie
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Author Affiliation
Neurosurgery, NeuroCenter, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland ; Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland ; Department of Neurobiology, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
PLoS Genet. 2014 Jan;10(1):e1004134
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2 - genetics
Europe
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Intracranial Aneurysm - genetics - pathology
Risk factors
Stroke - genetics - pathology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - genetics - pathology
Abstract
3% of the population develops saccular intracranial aneurysms (sIAs), a complex trait, with a sporadic and a familial form. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from sIA (sIA-SAH) is a devastating form of stroke. Certain rare genetic variants are enriched in the Finns, a population isolate with a small founder population and bottleneck events. As the sIA-SAH incidence in Finland is >2× increased, such variants may associate with sIA in the Finnish population. We tested 9.4 million variants for association in 760 Finnish sIA patients (enriched for familial sIA), and in 2,513 matched controls with case-control status and with the number of sIAs. The most promising loci (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24497844 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Self-Reported and Objectively Recorded Early Life Stress, FKBP5 Polymorphisms, and Depressive Symptoms in Midlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284243
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;80(11):869-877
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Jari Lahti
Heidi Ala-Mikkula
Eero Kajantie
Kadri Haljas
Johan G Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;80(11):869-877
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Self Report
Stress, Psychological
Tacrolimus Binding Proteins - genetics
World War II
Abstract
FK506-binding protein 51 is involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene have been shown to interact with retrospectively self-reported early life stress (ELS) in patients with psychiatric disorders. We examined interactions between three selected FKBP5 SNPs and self-reported and objectively recorded ELS in relation to depressive symptoms in midlife.
This study comprised 1431 Helsinki Birth Cohort Study participants genotyped for FKBP5 SNPs shown to alter cortisol metabolism (rs1360780, rs9470080, and rs9394309). Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at ages 61.5 years (time 1) and 63.4 years (time 2); 165 and 181 participants were separated from their parents in childhood as a result of evacuations during World War II as indicated by self-reports and the Finnish National Archives registry, respectively.
Associations between self-reported and objectively recorded ELS, but not stressful events in midlife, and the mean BDI score (average of time 1 and time 2) or mild to severe BDI scores (10-63 points at time 1 and time 2), or both, were moderated by the FKBP5 variants (p values for interactions .18). Mean BDI scores or odds for having mild to severe BDI scores, or both, increased according to number of minor alleles and haplotypes derived from these alleles in the separated groups, but not in the nonseparated groups.
FKBP5 variations in combination with self-reported and objectively recorded ELS predict more pronounced depressive symptoms in midlife. Our findings confirm previous retrospective findings in a prospective epidemiologic study setting.
PubMed ID
26740367 View in PubMed
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Does systemic low-grade inflammation associate with fat accumulation and distribution? A 7-year follow-up study with peripubertal girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105312
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):1411-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Xinfei Wen
Satu Pekkala
Renwei Wang
Petri Wiklund
Guoshaung Feng
Shu Mei Cheng
Xiao Tan
Yang Liu
Peijie Chen
Johan G Eriksson
Markku Alen
Sulin Cheng
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology (X.W., R.W., Y.L., P.C., S.C.), Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai 200438, China; Department of Health Sciences (X.W., S.P., P.W., S.M.C., X.T., Y.L., S.C.), University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä, Finland; National Center for Public Health Surveillance and Information Services (G.F.), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China; Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care (J.G.E.), Helsinki University, and Unit of General Practice (J.G.E.), Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland; Folkhälsan Research Centre (J.G.E.), FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medical Rehabilitation (P.W., S.M.C., M.A.), Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90221, Oulu, Finland; and Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, FIN-90220 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):1411-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Body Fat Distribution
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Obesity - epidemiology
Puberty - metabolism
Abstract
Knowledge about the interrelationship between adiposity and systemic low-grade inflammation during pubertal growth is important in detecting early signs of obesity-related metabolic disorders.
The objective of the study was to evaluate the developmental trajectories of fat mass (FM) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and factors that could explain the relationship between FM and hsCRP in girls from prepuberty to early adulthood.
This was a 7.5-year longitudinal study.
The study was conducted at the University of Jyväskylä Sports and Health Science laboratory.
Three hundred ninety-six healthy Finnish girls aged 11.2 ± 0.8 years participated in the study.
Body composition was assessed by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum concentrations of hsCRP, adipokines, and sex hormones by ELISA.
Both FM and hsCRP increased with age and had similar trajectories but different inter- and intravariance patterns. A joint analysis of fat distribution and hsCRP indicated that the linkage probabilities across different trajectory subgroups between regional FM and the corresponding hsCRP levels varied from 16% to 53%. In a longitudinal regression model, the common predictor for both FM and hsCRP was T (ß = .065, P
PubMed ID
24423339 View in PubMed
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Hypertension predisposes to the formation of saccular intracranial aneurysms in 467 unruptured and 1053 ruptured patients in Eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259377
Source
Ann Med. 2014 May;46(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Antti E Lindgren
Mitja I Kurki
Annamaija Riihinen
Timo Koivisto
Antti Ronkainen
Jaakko Rinne
Juha Hernesniemi
Johan G Eriksson
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Mikael von und zu Fraunberg
Source
Ann Med. 2014 May;46(3):169-76
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Incidence
Intracranial Aneurysm - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Rupture, Spontaneous
Smoking - epidemiology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - etiology
Abstract
Hypertension associates with subarachnoid hemorrhage from saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA-SAH) when compared to matched controls or general population. Few series compare hypertension in unruptured sIA versus sIA-SAH, so its impact on the sIA disease remains uncertain.
Kuopio sIA Database ( www.uef.fi/ns ) contains all cases of unruptured and ruptured sIAs admitted to Kuopio University Hospital from its Eastern Finnish catchment population. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of drug-treated hypertension in 467 unruptured and 1053 ruptured sIA patients admitted to Kuopio University Hospital from 1995 to 2007, using the national registry of prescribed medicines.
Antihypertensive medication was more frequent in the unruptured (73% versus 62%) with higher age-adjusted incidence. At sIA diagnosis, the sIA-SAH group had more often untreated hypertension (29% versus 23%). The size of unruptured sIAs increased with age at sIA diagnosis, independently of hypertension. Multiple sIAs, familial sIA, and sIA-SAH were not associated with hypertension in multivariate analysis. Results indicate that drug-treated hypertension associates with the formation of sIAs rather than their growth or rupture.
Hypertension is highly prevalent in the carriers of unruptured sIAs when compared to those with ruptured sIA. Hypertension may associate with the sIA formation, and may predispose to the rupture of sIA if untreated.
PubMed ID
24579936 View in PubMed
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Cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults who were born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265378
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 1;181(11):861-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2015
Author
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marja Vääräsmäki
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Hanna-Maria Matinolli
Satu Miettola
Petteri Hovi
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Aimo Ruokonen
Jouko Sundvall
Anneli Pouta
Johan G Eriksson
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Eero Kajantie
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 1;181(11):861-73
Date
Jun-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood glucose
Blood pressure
Body Weights and Measures
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Adults who were born preterm with a very low birth weight have higher blood pressure and impaired glucose regulation later in life compared with those born at term. We investigated cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults who were born at any degree of prematurity in the Preterm Birth and Early Life Programming of Adult Health and Disease (ESTER) Study, a population-based cohort study of individuals born in 1985-1989 in Northern Finland. In 2009-2011, 3 groups underwent clinical examination: 134 participants born at less than 34 gestational weeks (early preterm), 242 born at 34-36 weeks (late preterm), and 344 born at 37 weeks or later (controls). Compared with controls, adults who were born preterm had higher body fat percentages (after adjustment for sex, age, and cohort (1985-1986 or 1987-1989), for those born early preterm, difference = 6.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4, 13.2; for those born late preterm, difference = 8.0%, 95% CI: 2.4, 13.8), waist circumferences, blood pressure (for those born early preterm, difference = 3.0 mm Hg, 95% CI: 0.9, 5.1; for those born late preterm, difference = 1.7, 95% CI: -0.1, 3.4), plasma uric acid levels (for those born early preterm, difference = 20.1%, 95% CI: 7.9, 32.3; for those born late preterm, difference = 20.2%, 95% CI: 10.7, 30.5), alanine aminotransferase levels, and aspartate transaminase levels. They were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome (for those born early preterm, odds ratio = 3.7, 95% CI: 1.6, 8.2; for those born late preterm, odds ratio = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 5.3). Elevated levels of conventional and emerging risk factors suggest a higher risk of cardiometabolic disease later in life. These risk factors are also present in the large group of adults born late preterm.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25947956 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression in young adults with very low birth weight: the Helsinki study of very low-birth-weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158496
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Mar;65(3):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Eero Kajantie
Petteri Hovi
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 9, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. katri.raikkonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Mar;65(3):290-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
Little is known about the mental health outcomes of very low-birth-weight (VLBW) ( or = -2 SDs according to Finnish birth weight charts), whose Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores were 29.1% (95% CI, -53.7% to -8.4%) lower than those of the controls (P =.004). Furthermore, VLBW participants born appropriate for gestational age were 4.8 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) times less likely to report a depression diagnosis than controls (P =.02). In contrast, 52 VLBW participants born small for gestational age (birth weight
PubMed ID
18316675 View in PubMed
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Growth before 2 years of age and serum lipids 60 years later: the Helsinki Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158867
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;37(2):280-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Eero Kajantie
David J P Barker
Clive Osmond
Tom Forsén
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
The National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. eero.kajantie@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;37(2):280-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Atherosclerosis - etiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Abstract
Small body size at birth and slow growth during the first 2 years after birth, leading to low body mass index (BMI) at 2 years, are associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in adult life. We tested the hypothesis that this path of growth is associated with an atherogenic lipid profile in later life.
We measured serum lipid concentrations at age 57-70 years in 1999 members of the Helsinki Birth Cohort. They were randomly selected from an original cohort of 8760 people and had on average 11 measurements of height and weight between birth and 2 years of age.
The 18% of subjects who used lipid-lowering medication had a lower BMI at birth and at 2 years. These subjects were excluded from the analyses of lipid profiles. A 1 kg/m(2) lower BMI at birth was associated with 0.051 mmol/l (95% CI -0.001 to 0.103; P = 0.05) higher non-HDL cholesterol and 0.018 g/l higher (0.005-0.031; P = 0.006) apolipoprotein B concentrations. A slower increase in BMI during the first 6 months after birth was associated with lower HDL and higher non-HDL cholesterol concentrations. A 1 kg/m(2) lower BMI at 2 years was associated with 0.020 mmol/l lower (0.004-0.036; P = 0.02) HDL cholesterol and 0.059 mmol/l (0.020-0.099; P = 0.003) higher non-HDL cholesterol and 0.018 mmol/l higher (0.008-0.028; P
PubMed ID
18267964 View in PubMed
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Determinants for the effectiveness of lifestyle intervention in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158954
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 May;31(5):857-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jaana Lindström
Markku Peltonen
Johan G Eriksson
Sirkka Aunola
Helena Hämäläinen
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Matti Uusitupa
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Unit, Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.lindstrom@ktl.fi
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 May;31(5):857-62
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Size
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Intolerance - complications
Heart rate
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - physiopathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Intensive lifestyle intervention significantly reduced diabetes incidence among the participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. We investigated whether and to what extent risk factors for type 2 diabetes and other baseline characteristics of the study participants modified the effectiveness of the lifestyle intervention.
Overweight, middle-aged volunteers with impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned to intensive lifestyle intervention (n = 265) or to a control group (n = 257) for a median of 4 years. Diabetes status was ascertained annually with repeated oral glucose tolerance testing. Incidence rates of diabetes and hazard ratios (HRs) comparing the intervention group with the control group were calculated by sex and baseline tertiles of age, BMI, waist circumference, plasma glucose concentration at fasting and 2 h after a glucose load, fasting serum insulin and insulin resistance index, and categories of composite baseline Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC). Interactions between the intervention assignment and baseline risk factors on diabetes risk were analyzed.
The intervention was most effective among the oldest individuals (HRs 0.77, 0.49, and 0.36 by increasing age tertiles, respectively; P(interaction) = 0.0130) and those with a high baseline FINDRISC (HRs 1.09, 0.84, 0.34, and 0.22 by increasing risk score category, respectively; P(interaction) = 0.0400). The effect of the intervention on diabetes risk was not modified by other baseline characteristics or risk factors.
The FINDRISC may be useful in identifying high-risk groups most likely to benefit from intensive lifestyle intervention to prevent type 2 diabetes.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 2008 Nov;31(11):e87; author reply e8818955714
PubMed ID
18252900 View in PubMed
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