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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Concurrent validity of the MMPI-2 feminine gender role (GF) and masculine gender role (GM) scales.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5571
Source
J Pers Assess. 1996 Feb;66(1):153-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
M E Johnson
G. Jones
C. Brems
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
J Pers Assess. 1996 Feb;66(1):153-68
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Social Desirability
Abstract
Since the development of the revised Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellege, & Kaemmer, 1989), no independent studies have been conducted to validate the new GF and GM scales, the only published study being based on the original standardization sample. To determine the concurrent validity of these scales, our study correlated GF and GM with scores obtained from the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, the Sex Role Behavior Scale, and the Sex Role Identity Scale. Because the sex-role literature has suggested numerous personality correlates of masculinity and femininity, the 16-PF was included to assess this dimension of the new scales, as well as measures of social desirability. Results revealed the GF and GM scales to have low internal consistency and low concurrent validity with established sex-role measures. Relative to construct validity, their patterns of correlation with personality measures suggest that GF and GM are more related to personality traits of interpersonal potency and sensitivity, respectively, than to masculinity and femininity. Overall, although the data yielded by these new scales provide additional information over Scale 5, they do not appear to hold as much promise as hoped for.
PubMed ID
8576829 View in PubMed
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Sex role conflict, social desirability, and eating-disorder attitudes and behaviors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5572
Source
J Gen Psychol. 1996 Jan;123(1):75-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
M E Johnson
C. Brems
P. Fischer
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage 99508-8224, USA.
Source
J Gen Psychol. 1996 Jan;123(1):75-87
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude to Health
Bulimia - diagnosis - psychology
Conflict (Psychology)
Eating Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Social Desirability
Abstract
The relationship of conflict between sex role ideology and sex role orientation with eating-disorder behaviors and attitudes was examined. American participants were 321 female college students who completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974), Sex Role Ideology Scale (Kalin & Tilby, 1978), and Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI; Garner, Olmsted, & Polivy, 1983). The results indicated that conflict between ideology and self-perception had little effect on responses to the Inventory. Instead, students with higher levels of self-rated social desirability and lower levels of masculinity reported higher prevalence of eating-disorder behaviors and attitudes. Analyses of sex role orientation data revealed that participants categorized as undifferentiated had the most pathological responses to the EDI. Overall, the results suggested that social desirability and masculinity, more than sex role orientation or conflict, are strongly related to eating-disorder behavior, perhaps because of a third mediating factor.
PubMed ID
8901211 View in PubMed
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Subtle-obvious scales of the MMPI: indicators of profile validity in a psychiatric population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3373
Source
J Pers Assess. 1991 Jun;56(3):536-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
C. Brems
M E Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508.
Source
J Pers Assess. 1991 Jun;56(3):536-44
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
MMPI - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Abstract
This study explored the usefulness of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) Subtle-Obvious scales as profile validity indicators with a inpatient psychiatric population. Some 292 MMPI profiles were utilized and divided into overreporters, underreporters, and standard reporters, based on their Subtle-Obvious scale scores. Reporting style was shown to be unrelated to actual patient pathology because of the lack of relationship between reporting style and diagnostic categorization according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd ed., rev. [DSM-III-R]; American Psychiatric Association, 1987) Axis I and II. Comparisons of MMPI profiles of the three groups revealed that overreporters endorsed more pathology on the MMPI clinical scales than did either underreporters or standard reporters. The same pattern of response style was demonstrated by subjects on another objective measure, the Beck Depression Inventory, whereas on a projective measure, the Rorschach Inkblot Test, there were no differences between groups. These findings suggest that clinicians may want to utilize the Subtle-Obvious scales to gain information about MMPI profile validity. Specifically, profiles of patients identified as overreporters should be interpreted with caution so as to not overstate their level of pathology.
PubMed ID
1865310 View in PubMed
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Further exploration of the Egocentricity Index in an inpatient psychiatric population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3375
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1990 Sep;46(5):675-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
C. Brems
M E Johnson
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1990 Sep;46(5):675-9
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - psychology
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
MMPI
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - psychology
Personality Disorders - psychology
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychometrics
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Rorschach test
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
Using the Rorschach protocols from 129 adult psychiatric inpatients, the Egocentricity Index as calculated in the Exner Comprehensive System was investigated relative to MMPI standard and special scales, Beck Depression Inventory, and other Rorschach variables. Results indicate that rather than being a measure of self-focus and self-centeredness, the Index might be related to introversion and introspection. Additionally, the Index may have differential implications about mental health for males vs. females.
PubMed ID
2246378 View in PubMed
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Assessment of social anxiety in first episode psychosis using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety scale as a self-report measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139685
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;26(2):115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
K L Romm
J I Rossberg
A O Berg
C F Hansen
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Author Affiliation
Psychosis Research Unit, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. k.l.romm@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;26(2):115-21
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Phobic Disorders - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Self Report - standards
Social Environment
Social Isolation
Young Adult
Abstract
Social anxiety is a common problem in psychotic disorders. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating version (LSAS-SR) is a widely used instrument to capture different aspects of social anxiety, but its psychometric properties have not been tested in this patient group. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the LSAS-SR in patients with first episode psychosis, to investigate whether it differentiated between active and passive social withdrawal and to test which clinical factors contributed to current level of social anxiety.
A total of 144 first episode psychosis patients from the ongoing Thematically Organized Psychosis (TOP) study were included at the time of first treatment. Diagnoses were set according to the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-1) for DSM-IV. A factor analysis was carried out and the relationship of social anxiety to psychotic and general symptomatology measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was evaluated. Possible contributors to social anxiety were analyzed using multiple hierarchic regression analysis.
The factor analysis identified three subscales: public performance, social interaction and observation. All three subscales showed satisfactory psychometric properties, acceptable convergent and discriminate properties, and confirmed previous findings in social anxiety samples. Self-esteem explained a significant amount of the variance in social anxiety, even after adjusting for the effects of delusions, suspiciousness and depression.
The study shows that the LSAS-SR can be used in this patient group, that social anxiety is strongly related to both behavioral social avoidance and to self-esteem. The results support the use of this measure in assessment of social anxiety in both clinical settings and in research.
PubMed ID
21036553 View in PubMed
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Evaluating three reading tests for use with alcohol and other drug-abusing populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11176
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1996 Sep;20(6):1125-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
M E Johnson
D G Fisher
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1996 Sep;20(6):1125-9
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Reading
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
This study compared three reading tests commonly used in research for screening, descriptive, and educational purposes with alcohol and other drug-abusing individuals. To that end, 82 male and 41 female substance abusers were administered the Slosson Oral Reading Test-Revised, Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised, and the Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised in random order. Results revealed that the tests have high concurrent validity, provide approximately the same grade-equivalent level scores, and yield raw scores that, when standardized, do not differ significantly from one another. However, if used for screening purposes, the three tests result in different proportions of subjects meeting specified criteria, particularly at lower grade levels. Specific test selection depends on the purpose of testing. For example, when the entire range of possible scores is of interest, the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised has a distinct advantage, because it has the widest range of grade-equivalent levels. Other considerations for test selection are discussed.
PubMed ID
8892538 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.