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Vertical distribution of 137Cs in grassland soils disturbed by moles (Talpa europaea L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289884
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2018 Apr; 184-185:101-108
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
V Ramzaev
A Barkovsky
Author Affiliation
Saint-Petersburg Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene after Professor P.V. Ramzaev, Mira Str. 8, 197101 St.-Petersburg, Russia. Electronic address: V.Ramzaev@mail.ru.
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2018 Apr; 184-185:101-108
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Grassland
Moles
Radiation monitoring
Russia
Soil - chemistry
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Activity of biota is one of the factors influencing vertical migration of radionuclides deposited from the atmosphere onto the ground surface. The goal of this work was to study the vertical distribution of 137Cs in grassland soils disturbed by moles (Talpa europaea L.) in comparison with undisturbed grassland soils. Field observations and soil sampling were carried out in the areas of eight settlements in the Klintsovskiy, Krasnogorskiy and Novozybkovskiy districts of the Bryansk region, Russia in six years during the period 1999-2016. The study sites had been heavily contaminated by Chernobyl fallout in 1986. Activity of 137Cs in soil samples was determined by ?-ray spectrometry. 137Cs surface ground contamination levels at the studied plots (n?=?17) ranged from 327?kBq m-2 to 2360?kBq m-2 with a mean of 1000?kBq m-2 and a median of 700?kBq m-2. The position of the 137Cs migration centre in the soil in 2010-2016 was significantly (the Mann-Whitney U test, P?
PubMed ID
29407638 View in PubMed
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[Henneguya wolinensis (Myxosporea: Myxobolidae), a new for Russian fauna parasite from the perch Perca fluviatilis L.].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289885
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Mar-Apr; 51(2):165-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
V N Voronin
E A Golineva
A S Dudin
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Mar-Apr; 51(2):165-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cysts - pathology
Epidermis - parasitology - pathology
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Myxozoa - anatomy & histology - growth & development - physiology
Parasitic Diseases, Animal - epidemiology
Perches - parasitology
Rivers - parasitology
Russia - epidemiology
Spores - growth & development - physiology - ultrastructure
Abstract
The infection of the perch Perea fluviatilis L. with myxosporean Henneguya wolinensis Romuk-Wodoracki, 1990 has been detected. This is the second finding of this parasite after its original descriptin and the first for Russia. Plasmodium of this species develops in the epidermis under scales throughout the body causing the formation of white cysts up to 1 mm. Spores are fusiform, large, their average length constitutes 25.5 µm without the caudal appendages and 62 µm with them. Slight morphological differences in spore structure comparing to original description have been revealed.
PubMed ID
29406161 View in PubMed
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[Infection of the pacific saury Cololabis saira by acanthocephalans in the Kuril Islands area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289886
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):51-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
I I Gordeev
I V Grigorov
P K Afanasyev
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):51-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acanthocephala - pathogenicity - physiology
Animals
Beloniformes - parasitology
Far East - epidemiology
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Helminthiasis, Animal - epidemiology - transmission
Islands
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The Pacific saury Cololabis saira (Brevoort, 1856) is one of the important target species of commercial fisheries. Food manufacturers and consumers encounter problems due to the infection of the saury by acanthocephalans, which are quite difficult to clean out completely during on-board catch processing. Infection of C. saira was not studied on a regular basis, therefore, our knowledge about the parasites of saury is fragmentary. This paper contains infection indices (only acanthocephalans) of the Pacific saury caught in the Kuril Islands area (Russian Exclusive Economic Zone) in 2015.
PubMed ID
29401576 View in PubMed
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[A case of the tick (Ixodidae) hiperinvasion of the tundra vole in magadan environs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289887
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):45-50
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Author
N E Dokuchaev
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):45-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - parasitology
Fatal Outcome
Ixodes - pathogenicity - physiology
Male
Siberia
Tick Infestations - parasitology - pathology
Tundra
Abstract
A case of tundra vole death as a result its hyperinvasion by ticks Ixodes angustus on the northern periphery of the Asiatic range of the parasite is given.
PubMed ID
29401575 View in PubMed
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[Exoskeleton anomalies among taiga tick males from populations of the Asiatic part of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289888
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):38-44
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
A Ya Nikitin
I M Morozov
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):38-44
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Shells - abnormalities
Animals
Climate
Female
Ixodes - anatomy & histology - genetics
Male
Phenotype
Siberia
Abstract
The taiga tick (Icodes persulcatus, Schulze, 1930) is the main and most epidemiologically dangerous vector of tick-born encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Borrelia in most parts of Russia's territory (Alekseev et al., 2008). The purpose of this article is to describe the incidence rate of I. persulcatus males with exoskeleton anomalies in populations of the Asiatic part of Russia. A total of 2630 taiga tick males were morphologically analyzed. They were collected in Far Eastern, Siberian and Ural Federal Districts (respectively, FEFD, SFD, UFD) in 15 geographically remote locations. It is shown that in all populations there are adult ticks with impaired exoskeleton, among which two types dominate: twin dents at the back of conscutum (P11), and uneven surface of conscutum - a "shagreen skin" (P9). The frequency of abnormalities in males from the areas with temperate monsoon and temperate continental climate (FEFD) was definitely lower (6.5 ± 1.05 %), than in individuals from the territories of SFD (29.7 ± 1.03 %) and UFD (25.8 ± 3.93 %) with continental and sharply continental climate. FEFD territory is also characterized by a less number of males having two simultaneous exoskeleton anomalies. Similar district-preconditioned differences in the frequency of recorded body distortions are also typical of females, with a higher percentage of deviant individuals in comparison with males. Thus, the identified polymorphism of exoskeleton structure of the taiga tick may reflect the natural phenogeographical variability of this trait and might not be the result of human impact.
PubMed ID
29401574 View in PubMed
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[The number of larvae and period of its production of Cosmocerca Ornata females (Nematoda: Cosmocercidae)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289889
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):22-37
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
N Y Kirillova
A A Kirillov
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):22-37
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Anura - parasitology
Ascaridida - pathogenicity - physiology
Body Size
Clutch Size
Female
Larva - pathogenicity - physiology
Phenotype
Russia
Seasons
Temperature
Abstract
The number of larvae in the Cosmocerca ornata (Dujardin, 1845) females from marsh frogs in vivo and period of larvae production of nematodes in vitro was studied. The number of larvae in females of nematodes and quantity of born larvae depend on the size of parasites. The largest C. ornata females had the highest number of larvae and the longest period of larvae production. The nematode sizes in its turn depends on density of infrapopulation of C. ornata and ambient temperature. The dependence of a number of the C. ornata larvae on the host age and sex and on a season of the year was revealed. Different phenotypes of amphibians showed no influence on the number of larvae inside nematode females. In the experiment C. ornata females remained viable up to 8 days, producing larvae up to 7 days. The optimum temperature for the larvae production constituted 24—28 °C. At a temperature of 12 °C and lower the nematode larvae output from females was stopped.
PubMed ID
29401573 View in PubMed
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New virus of the family Flaviviridae detected in lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289896
Source
Arch Virol. 2018 Mar; 163(3):679-685
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Renate Hvidsten Skoge
Jarle Brattespe
Arnfinn Lodden Økland
Heidrun Plarre
Are Nylund
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Thormøhlensgt. 55, Pb. 7803, 5020, Bergen, Norway. renate.skoge@uib.no.
Source
Arch Virol. 2018 Mar; 163(3):679-685
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Flaviviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Flaviviridae Infections - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Gene Expression
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral
Kidney - pathology - virology
Liver - pathology - virology
Norway - epidemiology
Perciformes - virology
Phylogeny
Protein Biosynthesis
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
In this study, we determined the complete coding sequence of a putative new member of the family Flaviviridae, named "Cyclopterus lumpus virus" (CLuV), which is associated with a serious disease in lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus). The virus was present in all tissues tested, but pathology was primarily observed in the liver and kidneys. CLuV shows low but distinct similarity to the unassigned Tamana bat virus (TABV). Unlike other known members of the family Flaviviridae, translation of the entire CLuV polyprotein is dependent on a - 1 ribosomal frameshift in the NS2A region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29147783 View in PubMed
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Genetic characterization of bank vole virus (BaVV), a new paramyxovirus isolated from kidneys of bank voles in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289897
Source
Arch Virol. 2018 Mar; 163(3):755-759
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Sergey Alkhovsky
Alexander Butenko
Aykaz Eremyan
Alexey Shchetinin
Author Affiliation
D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, N.F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology, Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation, 18 Gamaleya str, Moscow, 123098, Russia. salkh@ya.ru.
Source
Arch Virol. 2018 Mar; 163(3):755-759
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - virology
Base Sequence
Genome Size
Genome, Viral
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Kidney - virology
Paramyxoviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Paramyxoviridae Infections - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - genetics
Rodent Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Abstract
A genome of bank vole virus (BaVV), isolated from kidney tissues of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) in Russia in 1973, was sequenced. The genomic organization of BaVV (3'-N-P/V/C-M-F-G-L-5', 16,992 nt in length; GenBank accession number MF943130) is most similar to that of Mossman virus (MoV) and Nariva virus (NarPV), two ungrouped paramyxoviruses isolated from rodents in Australia and Trinidad, respectively. The proteins of BaVV have the highest level of sequence identity (ranging from 23-28% for G protein to 66-73% for M protein) to proteins of MoV and NarPV. The results of genetic and phylogenetic analysis suggest that BaVV represents a new species and, together with MoV and NarPV, belongs to a new, yet not established genus of the family Paramyxoviridae.
PubMed ID
29129019 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Vet J. 2017 11; 58(11):1149-1151
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-2017
Author
Bernard E Rollin
Source
Can Vet J. 2017 11; 58(11):1149-1151
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animal Welfare
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Fishes
Humans
Veterinary Medicine - ethics
PubMed ID
29089650 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of assortative mate choice on the genomic and morphological structure of a hybrid zone between two bird subspecies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289901
Source
Mol Ecol. 2017 Nov; 26(22):6430-6444
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Georgy A Semenov
Elizabeth S C Scordato
David R Khaydarov
Chris C R Smith
Nolan C Kane
Rebecca J Safran
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.
Source
Mol Ecol. 2017 Nov; 26(22):6430-6444
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Evolution
Feathers
Genetic markers
Genetics, Population
Hybridization, Genetic
Kazakhstan
Mating Preference, Animal
Models, Genetic
Passeriformes - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Reproductive Isolation
Selection, Genetic
Siberia
Uzbekistan
Abstract
Phenotypic differentiation plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of reproductive barriers. In some cases, variation in a few key aspects of phenotype can promote and maintain divergence; hence, the identification of these traits and their associations with patterns of genomic divergence is crucial for understanding the patterns and processes of population differentiation. We studied hybridization between the alba and personata subspecies of the white wagtail (Motacilla alba), and quantified divergence and introgression of multiple morphological traits and 19,437 SNP loci on a 3,000 km transect. Our goal was to identify traits that may contribute to reproductive barriers and to assess how variation in these traits corresponds to patterns of genome-wide divergence. Variation in only one trait-head plumage patterning-was consistent with reproductive isolation. Transitions in head plumage were steep and occurred over otherwise morphologically and genetically homogeneous populations, whereas cline centres for other traits and genomic ancestry were displaced over 100 km from the head cline. Field observational data show that social pairs mated assortatively by head plumage, suggesting that these phenotypes are maintained by divergent mating preferences. In contrast, variation in all other traits and genetic markers could be explained by neutral diffusion, although weak ecological selection cannot be ruled out. Our results emphasize that assortative mating may maintain phenotypic differences independent of other processes shaping genome-wide variation, consistent with other recent findings that raise questions about the relative importance of mate choice, ecological selection and selectively neutral processes for divergent evolution.
PubMed ID
28987006 View in PubMed
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Demographic inference from whole-genome and RAD sequencing data suggests alternating human impacts on goose populations since the last ice age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289902
Source
Mol Ecol. 2017 Nov; 26(22):6270-6283
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
J M Pujolar
L Dalén
M M Hansen
J Madsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Mol Ecol. 2017 Nov; 26(22):6270-6283
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources
Denmark
Ecosystem
Geese - genetics
Genetics, Population
Human Activities
Humans
Iceland
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Svalbard
Abstract
We investigated how population changes and fluctuations in the pink-footed goose might have been affected by climatic and anthropogenic factors. First, genomic data confirmed the existence of two separate populations: western (Iceland) and eastern (Svalbard/Denmark). Second, demographic inference suggests that the species survived the last glacial period as a single ancestral population with a low population size (100-1,000 individuals) that split into the current populations at the end of the last glacial maximum with Iceland being the most plausible glacial refuge. While population changes during the last glaciation were clearly environmental, we hypothesize that more recent demographic changes are human-related: (1) the inferred population increase in the Neolithic is due to deforestation to establish new lands for agriculture, increasing available habitat for pink-footed geese, (2) the decline inferred during the Middle Ages is due to human persecution, and (3) improved protection explains the increasing demographic trends during the 20th century. Our results suggest both environmental (during glacial cycles) and anthropogenic effects (more recent) can be a threat to species survival.
PubMed ID
28980346 View in PubMed
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Rare earth elements in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems in the eastern Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289905
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18; 19(10):1336-1345
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-18-2017
Author
Gwyneth Anne MacMillan
John Chételat
Joel P Heath
Raymond Mickpegak
Marc Amyot
Author Affiliation
Centre for Northern Studies, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, CanadaH2V 2S9. m.amyot@umontreal.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18; 19(10):1336-1345
Date
Oct-18-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Carbon Isotopes - analysis
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food chain
Fresh Water - chemistry
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Metals, Rare Earth - analysis
Mining
Nitrogen Isotopes - analysis
Seawater - chemistry
Abstract
Few ecotoxicological studies exist for rare earth elements (REEs), particularly field-based studies on their bioaccumulation and food web dynamics. REE mining has led to significant environmental impacts in several countries (China, Brazil, U.S.), yet little is known about the fate and transport of these contaminants of emerging concern. Northern ecosystems are potentially vulnerable to REE enrichment from prospective mining projects at high latitudes. To understand how REEs behave in remote northern food webs, we measured REE concentrations and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (?15N, ?13C) in biota from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems of the eastern Canadian Arctic (N = 339). Wildlife harvesting and tissue sampling was partly conducted by local hunters through a community-based monitoring project. Results show that REEs generally follow a coherent bioaccumulation pattern for sample tissues, with some anomalies for redox-sensitive elements (Ce, Eu). Highest REE concentrations were found at low trophic levels, especially in vegetation and aquatic invertebrates. Terrestrial herbivores, ringed seal, and fish had low total REE levels in muscle tissue (?REE for 15 elements
PubMed ID
28879355 View in PubMed
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Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluoroalkyl substances in a remote population of Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289912
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):387-395
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Samuel Byrne
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Pamela Miller
Vi Waghiyi
Frank A von Hippel
C Loren Buck
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Studies, 104 Memorial Hall, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY 13617, USA. Electronic address: sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):387-395
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Animals
Diet
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Fluorocarbons - blood
Food
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - blood
Humans
Islands
Smegmamorpha - metabolism
Abstract
Many Alaska Native communities rely on a traditional marine diet that contains persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The indoor environment is also a source of POPs. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are present both in the traditional diet and the home indoor environment.
We assessed exposure to PBDEs and PFASs among residents of two remote Alaska Native villages on St. Lawrence Island. Ninespine stickleback (Pungitious pungitious) and Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) were used to detect accumulation of these compounds in the local environment.
Concentrations of PBDEs and PFASs were measured in dust collected from 49 households on St. Lawrence Island, as well as in blood serum from 85 island residents. Resident ninespine stickleback and Alaska blackfish were used as sentinels to detect accumulation of PBDEs and PFASs in the food web.
Serum concentrations of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were elevated, despite low concentrations of PFASs in dust samples. Concentrations of PBDEs in dust and serum were similar to those from the contiguous United States. Statistical associations between dust and serum concentrations are apparent for a small number of PBDEs, suggesting a possible route of exposure. Predominant compounds were similar between human sera and stickleback; however, blackfish accumulated PFASs not found in either stickleback or human sera.
Household dust contributes to PBDE exposure, but not PFAS exposure. Elevated concentrations of long chain PFASs in serum are likely due to exposure from traditional foods. The presence of both PFASs and PBDEs in sentinel fish species suggests atmospheric deposition and bioaccumulation, as well as local environmental contamination.
PubMed ID
28818814 View in PubMed
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Plerocercoids of the cestode Diphyllobothrium ditremum in brown trout Salmo trutta: substantial increase in infection after establishment of European minnow Phoxinus phoxinus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289917
Source
J Fish Biol. 2017 Sep; 91(3):912-927
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
R Borgstrøm
J Trømborg
T O Haugen
B O Rosseland
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås, Norway.
Source
J Fish Biol. 2017 Sep; 91(3):912-927
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cestoda - growth & development
Cestode Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Cyprinidae - parasitology - physiology
Diphyllobothrium
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Host-Parasite Interactions
Introduced species
Lakes
Norway
Seasons
Trout - parasitology - physiology
Abstract
This study focuses on plerocercoids of the cestode Diphyllobothrium ditremum in brown trout Salmo trutta from the subalpine lake Øvre Heimdalsvatn in south-central Norway. Salmo trutta was the only fish species in this lake until European minnow Phoxinus phoxinus was registered in 1969. The P. phoxinus population increased substantially in the following years. In contrast with the 1969-1972 period, when plerocercoids of D. ditremum were practically absent in S. trutta, there was a high prevalence and intensity of infection in the 2013 S. trutta samples. Because the life cycle of D. ditremum involves two larval stages, in copepods and salmonids and mature worms in piscivorous birds, such as mergansers and loons, a change in feeding ecology of S. trutta or changes in population densities of copepods, fish or birds might have influenced the infection pattern. No relationships between D. ditremum infection and muscle-tissue d15 N signature or Hg concentration were found, indicating that infection is not a result of piscivory or cannibalism. Furthermore, consumption of copepods by S. trutta during summer and autumn was low. On the other hand, the number of piscivorous birds has increased, probably due to the presence of P. phoxinus as a new and numerous prey. An increased number of final D. ditremum hosts may have produced a higher output of cestode eggs, resulting in more infected copepods that in turn are consumed by S. trutta. Indirectly, P. phoxinus may therefore have caused the observed increased infection in S. trutta and thereby imposed further negative effects on S. trutta in high mountain areas.
PubMed ID
28758219 View in PubMed
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Detection and genetic characterization of a wide range of infectious agents in Ixodes pavlovskyi ticks in Western Siberia, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289929
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2017 May 25; 10(1):258
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-25-2017
Author
Vera Rar
Natalia Livanova
Sergey Tkachev
Galina Kaverina
Artem Tikunov
Yuliya Sabitova
Yana Igolkina
Victor Panov
Stanislav Livanov
Nataliya Fomenko
Igor Babkin
Nina Tikunova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation.
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2017 May 25; 10(1):258
Date
May-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthropod Vectors - microbiology - physiology - virology
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - microbiology - transmission
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology - physiology - virology
Siberia
Tick-Borne Diseases - microbiology - transmission - virology
Virus Diseases - transmission - virology
Viruses - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The Ixodes pavlovskyi tick species, a member of the I. persulcatus/I. ricinus group, was discovered in the middle of the 20th century in the Russian Far East. Limited data have been reported on the detection of infectious agents in this tick species. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic variability of a wide range of infectious agents in I. pavlovskyi ticks collected in their traditional and recently invaded habitats, the Altai Mountains and Novosibirsk Province, respectively, which are both located within the Western Siberian part of the I. pavlovskyi distribution area.
This study reports the novel discovery of Borrelia bavariensis, Rickettsia helvetica, R. heilongjiangensis, R. raoultii, "Candidatus Rickettsia tarasevichiae", Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia muris, "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" and Babesia microti in I. pavlovskyi ticks. In addition, we confirmed the previous identification of B. afzelii, B. garinii and B. miyamotoi, as well as tick-borne encephalitis and Kemerovo viruses in this tick species. The prevalence and some genetic characteristics of all of the tested agents were compared with those found in I. persulcatus ticks that were collected at the same time in the same locations, where these tick species occur in sympatry. It was shown that the prevalence and genotypes of many of the identified pathogens did not significantly differ between I. pavlovskyi and I. persulcatus ticks. However, I. pavlovskyi ticks were significantly more often infected by B. garinii and less often by B. bavariensis, B. afzelii, "Ca. R. tarasevichiae", and E. muris than I. persulcatus ticks in both studied regions. Moreover, new genetic variants of B. burgdorferi (sensu lato) and Rickettsia spp. as well as tick-borne encephalitis and Kemerovo viruses were found in both I. pavlovskyi and I. persulcatus ticks.
Almost all pathogens that were previously detected in I. persulcatus ticks were identified in I. pavlovskyi ticks; however, the distribution of species belonging to the B. burgdorferi (sensu lato) complex, the genus Rickettsia, and the family Anaplasmataceae was different between the two tick species. Several new genetic variants of viral and bacterial agents were identified in I. pavlovskyi and I. persulcatus ticks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28545549 View in PubMed
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The first case of morphological differentiation of Altai Osman Oreoleuciscus potanini (Cyprinidae, Actinopterigii) in a river.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289933
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Mar; 473(1):57-60
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Yu Yu Dgebuadze
A N Mironovskii
B Mendsaikhan
Yu V Slyn'ko
Author Affiliation
Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119071, Russia. yudgeb@gmail.com.
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Mar; 473(1):57-60
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cyprinidae - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Ecosystem
Lakes
Rivers
Russia
Skull - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Abstract
The variability of osteological characters has been investigated in cyprinid fish of the genus Oreoleuciscus (Potanin Altai osman) from the river Zavkhan; this fish species is endemic for water bodies of Central Asia. Multivariate analysis of 13 quantitative parameters of the size of the cerebral and visceral skull and the pectoral girdle and the construction of ontogenetic channels allowed the detection of morphologically distinct forms in the fluvial habitats. The result obtained provides additional proof of the possibility of sympatric diversification of fish in river ecosystems. One of the two fluvial forms discovered has been shown to be identical (with regard to the osteological characters) to a previously described herbivorous form of O. potanini from the standing water bodies of the Great Lakes Hollow (Western Mongolia).
PubMed ID
28508205 View in PubMed
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Effect of Preparation Based on Trametes Pubescens Xylotroph Fungi on Lipid Peroxidation in the Blood of Experimental Animals under Conditions of Dark Stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289938
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2017 Apr; 162(6):762-764
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
L I Kolesnikova
S I Kolesnikov
E D Romanova
V A Chkhenkeli
M A Darenskaya
L A Grebenkina
L I Korytov
O V Bugun
N V Koroleva
I N Gutnik
F F Antonenko
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Family Health and Human Reproduction, Irkutsk, Russia.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2017 Apr; 162(6):762-764
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Suckling
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Complex Mixtures - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Darkness
Glutathione - blood
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Oxidative Stress
Stress, Physiological - drug effects
Superoxide Dismutase - blood
Swine
Trametes - chemistry
Vitamin A - blood
alpha-Tocopherol - blood
Abstract
Using the model of dark stress caused by animal maintenance at dimmed light we showed that Trametin (product obtained during liquid-phase culturing of Trametes pubescens xylotroph fungi) effectively prevented oxidative stress under conditions of light deprivation. The preparation increased the level of unsaturation of lipids, reduced the concentration of primary and end-products of LPO, and increases both the integral parameter of the antioxidant defense system (total antioxidant activity) and its components (activity of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione).
PubMed ID
28429215 View in PubMed
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Novel Orthopoxvirus Infection in an Alaska Resident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289944
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15; 64(12):1737-1741
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2017
Author
Yuri P Springer
Christopher H Hsu
Zachary R Werle
Link E Olson
Michael P Cooper
Louisa J Castrodale
Nisha Fowler
Andrea M McCollum
Cynthia S Goldsmith
Ginny L Emerson
Kimberly Wilkins
Jeffrey B Doty
Jillybeth Burgado
JinXin Gao
Nishi Patel
Matthew R Mauldin
Mary G Reynolds
Panayampalli S Satheshkumar
Whitni Davidson
Yu Li
Joseph B McLaughlin
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Anchorage.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15; 64(12):1737-1741
Date
Jun-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Fomites - virology
Humans
Mammals - virology
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Orthopoxvirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Phylogeny
Poxviridae Infections - diagnosis - virology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Skin - pathology - virology
Abstract
Human infection by orthopoxviruses is being reported with increasing frequency, attributed in part to the cessation of smallpox vaccination and concomitant waning of population-level immunity. In July 2015, a female resident of interior Alaska presented to an urgent care clinic with a dermal lesion consistent with poxvirus infection. Laboratory testing of a virus isolated from the lesion confirmed infection by an Orthopoxvirus.
The virus isolate was characterized by using electron microscopy and nucleic acid sequencing. An epidemiologic investigation that included patient interviews, contact tracing, and serum testing, as well as environmental and small-mammal sampling, was conducted to identify the infection source and possible additional cases.
Neither signs of active infection nor evidence of recent prior infection were observed in any of the 4 patient contacts identified. The patient's infection source was not definitively identified. Potential routes of exposure included imported fomites from Azerbaijan via the patient's cohabiting partner or wild small mammals in or around the patient's residence. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the virus represents a distinct and previously undescribed genetic lineage of Orthopoxvirus, which is most closely related to the Old World orthopoxviruses.
Investigation findings point to infection of the patient after exposure in or near Fairbanks. This conclusion raises questions about the geographic origins (Old World vs North American) of the genus Orthopoxvirus. Clinicians should remain vigilant for signs of poxvirus infection and alert public health officials when cases are suspected.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28329402 View in PubMed
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Effect of animal-assisted interventions on depression, agitation and quality of life in nursing home residents suffering from cognitive impairment or dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289975
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 12; 31(12):1312-1321
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2016
Author
Christine Olsen
Ingeborg Pedersen
Astrid Bergland
Marie-José Enders-Slegers
Grete Patil
Camilla Ihlebaek
Author Affiliation
Section for Public Health Science, Department of Landscape Architecture and Spatial Planning, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway. christine.olsen@nmbu.no.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 12; 31(12):1312-1321
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cognition Disorders - psychology
Dementia - psychology
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Dogs
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Pets - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychomotor Agitation - therapy
Quality of Life - psychology
Abstract
The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home residents is known to be very high, with depression and agitation being the most common symptoms. The possible effects of a 12-week intervention with animal-assisted activities (AAA) in nursing homes were studied. The primary outcomes related to depression, agitation and quality of life (QoL).
A prospective, cluster randomized multicentre trial with a follow-up measurement 3?months after end of intervention was used. Inclusion criteria were men and women aged 65?years or older, with a diagnosis of dementia or having a cognitive deficit. Ten nursing homes were randomized to either AAA with a dog or a control group with treatment as usual. In total, 58 participants were recruited: 28 in the intervention group and 30 in the control group. The intervention consisted of a 30-min session with AAA twice weekly for 12?weeks in groups of three to six participants, led by a qualified dog handler. Norwegian versions of the Cornell Scale for Depression, the Brief Agitation Rating Scale and the Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia scale were used.
A significant effect on depression and QoL was found for participants with severe dementia at follow-up. For QoL, a significant effect of AAA was also found immediately after the intervention. No effects on agitation were found.
Animal-assisted activities may have a positive effect on symptoms of depression and QoL in older people with dementia, especially those in a late stage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Notes
CommentIn: Evid Based Nurs. 2017 Apr;20(2):60 PMID 28219932
PubMed ID
26807956 View in PubMed
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An Ecological and Human Biomonitoring Investigation of Mercury Contamination at the Aamjiwnaang First Nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289980
Source
Ecohealth. 2016 12; 13(4):784-795
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2016
Author
Diana Cryderman
Lisa Letourneau
Fiona Miller
Niladri Basu
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
Source
Ecohealth. 2016 12; 13(4):784-795
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollution
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
The Aamjiwnaang First Nations community is located in Canada's 'Chemical Valley' situated in southwest Ontario near Sarnia. Mercury pollution in the region has been known since the 1940s but little is known about levels in the environment and area residents. The current study, using ecological and human exposure assessment methods, was conducted at the community's request to help fill these gaps. First, Canada's National Pollutant Release Inventory and the U.S. Toxics Release Inventory were queried to investigate mercury releases from area facilities. In 2010, 700 pounds of mercury were emitted into the air, 25 pounds were released into water bodies, and 93 thousand pounds were disposed of on-site via underground injections or into landfills, and together these show continued releases into the region. Second, mercury levels were measured in stream sediment and nearby soil from sites at Aamjiwnaang (n = 4) and off Reserve (n = 19) in Canada and the U.S. during three seasons that spanned 2010-2011. Total mercury in sediment across all sites and sampling seasons ranged from 5.0 to 398.7 µg/kg, and in soils ranged from 1.2 to 696.2 µg/kg. Sediment and soil mercury levels at Aamjiwnaang were higher than the reference community, and Aamjiwnaang's Talfourd Creek site had the highest mercury levels. Third, a biomonitoring study was performed with 43 mother-child pairs. Hair (mean ± SD of all participants: 0.18 ± 0.16 µg/g) and blood (1.6 ± 2.0 µg/L) mercury levels did not differ between participants studied on- and off-Reserve, likely because of limited seafood intake (
Notes
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PubMed ID
27645755 View in PubMed
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2013 records – page 1 of 101.