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Assessments of pain in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: a retrospective population-based registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284103
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Aug;59(8):858-863
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Lena Westbom
Amanda Rimstedt
Eva Nordmark
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Aug;59(8):858-863
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Palsy - classification - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Pain Measurement - methods
Prevalence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore pain screening in CPUP, a follow-up surveillance programme for people with cerebral palsy (CP), specifically to describe reported pain prevalence, localizations, patterns of distribution; to compare with studies using psychometrically sound assessment instruments; and to assess agreement between pain documented in CPUP and medical records.
Registry study of a population with CP, born 1993 to 2008, living in Skåne, Sweden in 2013. Descriptive data, cross-tabulations, and chi-square tests to characterize and compare the study groups. Kappa analysis to test the concordance between register and medical record reports on pain.
Pain was reported by 185 out of 497 children (37%; females 40%, males 35%). Level V in both Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) was associated with highest prevalence of pain (50% and 54%), and level I with lowest prevalence of pain (30% and 32%). Pain was most frequent in dyskinetic CP (46%) and least frequent in unilateral spastic CP (33%). Feet and knees were the dominant localizations. Fair-moderate agreement (kappa 0.37, prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa [PABAK] 0.44) was found between documented pain in CPUP and medical records, although more seldom recognized in medical records.
The distribution of pain between CP subtypes, functional levels, sex, and age in CPUP is concordant with previous population-based studies, indicating the validity of the CPUP pain screening. Despite this, further clinical evaluation with extended pain assessments and pain management were largely neglected in children reporting chronic pain.
PubMed ID
28509356 View in PubMed
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Haptoglobin Hp2 Variant Promotes Premature Cardiovascular Death in Stroke Survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284104
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jun;48(6):1463-1469
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Petra Ijäs
Susanna Melkas
Jani Saksi
Antti Jula
Matti Jauhiainen
Niku Oksala
Tarja Pohjasvaara
Markku Kaste
Pekka J Karhunen
Perttu Lindsberg
Timo Erkinjuntti
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jun;48(6):1463-1469
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - genetics - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Haptoglobins - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke - genetics - mortality
Survivors
Abstract
Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase plasma protein protecting tissues from oxidative damage. It exists in 2 variant alleles (hp1/hp2) giving rise to 3 protein isoforms with different biochemical properties and efficiency to limit oxidative stress. We previously found that hp2 variant is associated with stroke risk in the patients with carotid stenosis and the risk of ischemic cardiovascular events in a general population cohort. This study examined the hypothesis that Hp genotype is associated with general cardiovascular risk in patients with stroke.
Hp was genotyped in SAM study (Helsinki Stroke Aging Memory, n=378). A total of 1426 individuals ascertained from a nationally representative cross-sectional health survey served as population controls.
Hp genotype frequencies were 15.6% (hp1-1), 44.2% (hp1-2), and 40.2% (hp2-2) in patients with stroke. During a mean of 7.5-year follow-up after first-ever stroke, hp2 carriers had a substantially higher rate of cardiac deaths (24.5% versus 8.5%; P=0.006) and a trend toward more fatal strokes (23.5% versus 13.6%; P=0.122). The combined risk of ischemic cardiovascular deaths was 2.4-fold higher among hp2 carriers (95% confidence interval, 1.28-4.43) after adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors.
Hp2 allele is associated with premature ischemic cardiovascular deaths after first-ever ischemic stroke.
PubMed ID
28487337 View in PubMed
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To Treat or Not to Treat: Anticoagulants as Secondary Preventives to the Oldest Old With Atrial Fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284105
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jun;48(6):1617-1623
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Peter Appelros
Bahman Farahmand
Andreas Terént
Signild Åsberg
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jun;48(6):1617-1623
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - epidemiology
Brain Ischemia - drug therapy - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Intracranial Hemorrhages - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Secondary Prevention - standards - statistics & numerical data
Stroke - drug therapy - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Anticoagulant treatment is effective for preventing recurrent ischemic strokes in patients who have atrial fibrillation. This benefit is paid by a small increase of hemorrhages. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhages seem to increase with age, but there are few studies showing whether the benefits of treatment persist in old age.
For this observational study, 4 different registers were used, among them Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. Patients who have had a recent ischemic stroke, were 80 to 100 years of age, and had atrial fibrillation, were included from 2006 through 2013. The patients were stratified into 3 age groups: 80 to 84, 85 to 89, and =90 years of age. Information on stroke severity, risk factors, drugs, and comorbidities was gathered from the registers. The patients were followed with respect to ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, other hemorrhages, or death.
Of all 23?356 patients with atrial fibrillation, 6361 (27%) used anticoagulants after an ischemic stroke. Anticoagulant treatment was associated with less recurrent ischemic stroke in all age groups. Hemorrhages increased most in the =90-year age group, but this did not offset the overall beneficial effect of the anticoagulant. Apart from age, no other cardiovascular risk factor or comorbidity was identified that influenced the risk of anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage. Drugs other than anticoagulants did not influence the incidence of major hemorrhage.
Given the patient characteristics in this study, there is room for more patients to be treated with anticoagulants, without hemorrhages to prevail. In nonagenarians, hemorrhages increased somewhat more, but this did not affect the overall outcome in this age stratum.
PubMed ID
28487335 View in PubMed
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Irregular Shape Identifies Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients With Multiple Aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284106
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jul;48(7):1986-1989
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Joel Björkman
Juhana Frösen
Olli Tähtinen
Daan Backes
Terhi Huttunen
Jaakko Harju
Jukka Huttunen
Mitja I Kurki
Mikael von Und Zu Fraunberg
Timo Koivisto
Hannu Manninen
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Antti E Lindgren
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jul;48(7):1986-1989
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aneurysm, Ruptured - complications - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intracranial Aneurysm - complications - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Risk factors
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We investigated which aneurysm-related risk factors for rupture best discriminate ruptured versus unruptured saccular intracranial aneurysms (sIAs) in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with multiple sIAs.
We included 264 subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with a ruptured sIA and at least one additional unruptured sIA, from the Kuopio Intracranial Aneurysm database from 2003 to 2015. These patients had 268 ruptured and 445 unruptured sIAs. Angiograms of the 713 sIAs were reevaluated for multiple variables describing aneurysm shape. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were used to calculate odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals for the independent risk factors for aneurysm rupture.
In the multivariate analysis, only sIA size (P
PubMed ID
28468927 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic Status and the Risk of Stroke Recurrence: Persisting Gaps Observed in a Nationwide Swedish Study 2001 to 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284107
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jun;48(6):1518-1523
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Johanna Pennlert
Kjell Asplund
Eva-Lotta Glader
Bo Norrving
Marie Eriksson
Source
Stroke. 2017 Jun;48(6):1518-1523
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Social Class
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This nationwide observational study aimed to investigate how socioeconomic status is associated with risk of stroke recurrence and how possible associations change over time.
This study included 168?295 patients, previously independent in activities of daily living, with a first-ever stroke in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) 2001 to 2012. Riksstroke was linked with Statistics Sweden as to add individual information on education and income. Subdistribution hazard regression was used to analyze time from 28 days after first stroke to stroke recurrence, accounting for the competing risk of other causes of death.
Median time of follow-up was 3.0 years. During follow-up, 23?560 patients had a first recurrent stroke, and 53?867 died from other causes. The estimated cumulative incidence of stroke recurrence was 5.3% at 1 year, and 14.3% at 5 years. Corresponding incidence for other deaths were 10.3% and 30.2%. Higher education and income were associated with a reduced risk of stroke recurrence. After adjusting for confounding variables, university versus primary school education returned a hazard ratio of 0.902; 95% confidence interval, 0.864 to 0.942, and the highest versus the lowest income tertile a hazard ratio of 0.955; 95% confidence interval, 0.922 to 0.989. The risk of stroke recurrence decreased during the study period, but the inverse effect of socioeconomic status on risk of recurrence did not change significantly.
Despite a declining risk of stroke recurrence over time, the differences in recurrence risk between different socioeconomic groups remained at a similar level in Sweden during 2001 to 2012.
PubMed ID
28465458 View in PubMed
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Clinical decision support for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (CDS-AF): Rationale and design of a cluster randomized trial in the primary care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284108
Source
Am Heart J. 2017 May;187:45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Lars O Karlsson
Staffan Nilsson
Emmanouil Charitakis
Magnus Bång
Gustav Johansson
Lennart Nilsson
Magnus Janzon
Source
Am Heart J. 2017 May;187:45-52
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications
Cost Savings
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - economics
Electronic Health Records
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care
Research Design
Risk factors
Stroke - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with substantial morbidity, in particular stroke. Despite good evidence for the reduction of stroke risk with anticoagulant therapy, there remains a significant undertreatment. The main aim of the current study is to investigate whether a clinical decision support tool for stroke prevention (CDS) integrated in the electronic health record can improve adherence to guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with AF.
We will conduct a cluster randomized trial where 43 primary care clinics in the county of Östergötland, Sweden (population 444,347), will be randomized to be part of the CDS intervention or serve as controls. The CDS will alert responsible physicians of patients with AF and increased risk for thromboembolism according to the CHA2DS2VASc (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age = 74 years, Diabetes mellitus, previous Stroke/TIA/thromboembolism, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category (i.e. female sex)) algorithm without anticoagulant therapy. The primary end point will be adherence to guidelines after 1 year.
The present study will investigate whether a clinical decision support system integrated in an electronic health record can increase adherence to guidelines regarding anticoagulant therapy in patients with AF.
PubMed ID
28454807 View in PubMed
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Blood biomarkers of carbohydrate, lipid, and apolipoprotein metabolisms and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A more than 20-year follow-up of the Swedish AMORIS cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284109
Source
Ann Neurol. 2017 May;81(5):718-728
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Daniela Mariosa
Niklas Hammar
Håkan Malmström
Caroline Ingre
Ingmar Jungner
Weimin Ye
Fang Fang
Göran Walldius
Source
Ann Neurol. 2017 May;81(5):718-728
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - blood - epidemiology
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fructosamine - blood
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the associations of blood biomarkers of carbohydrate, lipid, and apolipoprotein metabolisms with the future risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
In the Apolipoprotein-related MOrtality RISk study, we enrolled 636,132 men and women during 1985-1996 in Stockholm, Sweden, with measurements of serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B (apoB), and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). Serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were either directly measured or calculated from total cholesterol, triglycerides, and apoA-I. The cohort was followed until the end of 2011. We used Cox models and mixed-effects models to, first, estimate the associations between these biomarkers and ALS incidence and, second, to assess the changes of these biomarkers during the 20 years before ALS diagnosis.
One-unit increase of LDL-C (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-1.27), apoB (HR = 1.68; 95% CI = 1.17-2.42), and apoB/apoA-I ratio (HR = 1.90; 95% CI = 1.29-2.78) was associated with a higher incidence of ALS. High glucose level (=6.11mmol/L) was associated with a lower incidence (HR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.42-0.93), whereas high LDL-C/HDL-C (=3.50; HR = 1.50; 95% CI = 1.15-1.96) and high apoB/apoA-I (=0.90 for men, =0.8 for women; HR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.04-1.90) ratios were associated with a higher incidence. During the 10 years before diagnosis, ALS patients had increasing levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, apoB, and apoA-I, whereas gradually decreasing levels of LDL-C/HDL-C and apoB/apoA-I ratios.
Alterations in the carbohydrate, lipid, and apolipoprotein metabolisms are associated with ALS risk and may serve as prodromal symptoms decades before ALS diagnosis. The imbalance between apoB and apoA-I as well as between LDL-C and HDL-C may be an etiological mechanism for ALS and needs to be further studied. Ann Neurol 2017;81:718-728.
PubMed ID
28437840 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of different dietary proteins and risk of type 2 diabetes in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284110
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(6):882-893
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Heli E K Virtanen
Timo T Koskinen
Sari Voutilainen
Jaakko Mursu
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Petra Kokko
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(6):882-893
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Dairy Products
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Proteins - pharmacology
Egg Proteins - pharmacology
Energy intake
Finland
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Plant Proteins - pharmacology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The roles of different dietary proteins in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain unclear. We investigated the associations of dietary proteins with the risk of incident T2D in Finnish men from the prospective Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. The study included 2332 men aged 42-60 years at the baseline examinations in 1984-1989. Protein intakes were calculated from 4-d dietary records. Incident T2D was determined by self-administered questionnaires, fasting blood glucose measurements, 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests, and with national registers. The multivariable-adjusted risk of T2D on the basis of protein intakes was compared by the Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR). During the mean follow-up of 19·3 years, 432 incident T2D cases were identified. Total, animal, meat or dairy product protein intakes were not associated with risk of T2D when the potential confounders were accounted for. Plant (multivariable-adjusted extreme-quartile HR 0·65; 95 % CI 0·42, 1·00; P trend 0·04) and egg (HR 0·67; 95 % CI 0·44, 1·00; P trend 0·03) protein intakes were associated with a decreased risk of T2D. Adjustments for BMI, plasma glucose and serum insulin slightly attenuated associations. Replacing 1 % energy from carbohydrates with energy from protein was associated with a 5 % (95 % CI 0, 11) increased risk of T2D, but adjustment for fibre intake attenuated the association. Replacing 1 % of energy from animal protein with energy from plant protein was associated with 18 % (95 % CI 0, 32) decreased risk of T2D. This association remained after adjusting for BMI. In conclusion, favouring plant and egg proteins appeared to be beneficial in preventing T2D.
PubMed ID
28397639 View in PubMed
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Prenatal exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and risk of fractures in late childhood: period and cohort results from 222 000 subjects in the D-tect observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284111
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(6):872-881
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Mina Nicole Händel
Peder Frederiksen
Clive Osmond
Cyrus Cooper
Bo Abrahamsen
Berit L Heitmann
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(6):872-881
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Food, Fortified
Fractures, Bone - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Margarine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diet therapy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk
Seasons
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications - diet therapy
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Prenatal low vitamin D may have consequences for bone health. By means of a nationwide mandatory vitamin D fortification programme, we examined the risk of fractures among 10-18-year-old children from proximate birth cohorts born around the date of the termination of the programme. For all subjects born in Denmark during 1983-1988, civil registration numbers were linked to the Danish National Patient Registry for incident and recurrent fractures occurring at ages 10-18 years. Multiplicative Poisson models were used to examine the association between birth cohort and fracture rates. The variation in fracture rates across birth cohorts was analysed by fitting an age-cohort model to the data. We addressed the potential modification of the effect of vitamin D availability by season of birth. The risk of fractures was increased among both girls and boys who were born before the vitamin D fortification terminated in 1985 (rate ratio (RR) exposed v. non-exposed girls: 1
15 (95 % CI 1
11, 1
20); RR exposed v. non-exposed boys: 1
11 (95 % CI 1
07, 1
14). However, these associations no longer persisted after including the period effects. There was no interaction between season of birth and vitamin D availability in relation to fracture risk. The study did not provide evidence that prenatal exposure to extra vitamin D from a mandatory fortification programme of 1
25 µg vitamin D/100 g margarine was sufficient to influence the risk of fractures in late childhood, regardless of season of birth. Replication studies are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28393739 View in PubMed
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The rate of invasive testing for trisomy 21 is reduced after implementation of NIPT.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284112
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Louise Bjerregaard
Anne Betsagoo Stenbakken
Camilla Skov Andersen
Line Kristensen
Cecilie Vibeke Jensen
Peter Skovbo
Anne Nødgaard Sørensen
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
DNA - blood
Denmark
Down Syndrome - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prenatal Diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) was introduced in the North Denmark Region in March 2013. NIPT is offered as an alternative to invasive tests if the combined first trimester risk of trisomy 21 (T21) is = 1:300. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of NIPT implementation among high-risk pregnancies in a region with existing first-trimester combined screening for T21. The primary objective was to examine the effect on the invasive testing rate.
This was a retrospective observational study including high-risk singleton pregnancies in the North Denmark Region. The women were included in two periods, i.e. before and after the implementation of NIPT, respectively. Group 1 (before NIPT): n = 253 and Group 2 (after NIPT): n = 302.
After NIPT implementation, the invasive testing rate fell from 70% to 48% (p
PubMed ID
28385172 View in PubMed
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Children and adolescents admitted to a university-level trauma centre in Denmark 2002-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284113
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Danny Stefan Ekström
Rasmus Hviid Larsen
Jens Martin Lauritsen
Christian Færgemann
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Injury Severity Score
Male
Registries
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiology of children or adolescents admitted to a Scandinavian trauma centre is largely unknown. The aim of this paper was to describe the epi-demiology and severity of potentially severely injured children and adolescents admitted to a university hospital trauma centre.
This was a descriptive study of all children and adolescents aged 0-17 admitted to the university level trauma centre at Odense University Hospital, Denmark in the 2002-2011 period. Data were extracted from the Southern Danish Trauma Register and from medical records.
A total of 950 children and adolescents were included. The median age was 13 (range: 0-17) years. Boys accounted for 60.6% of the cases. Accidents accounted for 97.2%, violence 1.4% and self-inflicted injuries 0.4%. More than three fourths of the injuries occurred either in traffic or at home. The occurrence was greatest in the summer (34.0%), during weekends (48.9%) and in the hours between 12.00 and 20.00 (59.2%). Overall, 58.5% of the in-juries were due to traffic. Of these injuries, 39.7% were in-juries suffered by passengers in motor vehicles, 27.5% drivers/passengers of a scooter/MC, 21.8% bicyclists and 10.3% pedestrians. The median Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Abbreviated Injury Scale was 4 (range: 1-75) and 2 (range: 1-6), respectively. Head/face injuries accounted for 36.5% and injuries to the extremities for 30.9% of all injuries. A total of 153 (16.1%) suffered from severe injuries (ISS > 15). Overall, 49 (5.2%) died due to their injuries.
Based on a local trauma register, we described the epidemiology and severity of potentially se-verely injured children and adolescents admitted to a university trauma centre.
none.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
28385171 View in PubMed
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Improved functional outcome after hip fracture is associated with duration of rehabilitation, but not with waiting time for rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284114
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Tonny Jaeger Pedersen
Louise Nicole Bie Bogh
Jens Martin Lauritsen
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
Hip Fractures - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recovery of Function
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Time-to-Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between "waiting time to onset of municipal rehabilitation", "length of municipal rehabilitation" and the attained level of function four months after the hip fracture.
Among a consecutive series of 156 patients, the 116 patients who were recommended a municipal rehabilitation sequence after discharge were included. The expos-ures were waiting time in days and duration in hours of the municipal rehabilitation. The outcome was lower-extremity functional level as measured with the Short Physical Per-form-ance Battery. Effects were assessed with non-parametric gamma coefficients.
The median waiting time to initiation of rehabilitation was ten days. A weak and insignificant correlation was observed between waiting time and outcome at four months, and a statistically significant correlation was recorded between duration of municipal rehabilitation and outcome, also at four months. No marked differences in these results were found when subgrouped by pre-fracture level of function as assessed with the Barthel-20 index.
Waiting times from hospital discharge to initiation of municipal rehabilitation seems not to correlate with functional level four months after the hip fracture. In contrast, the amount of municipal rehabilitation time does correlate with a better functional level four months after the hip fracture. Furthermore, large-sample studies are warranted to clarify this relationship.
none.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
28385169 View in PubMed
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Hearing screening in newborns in the Central Denmark Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284115
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Linda Busk Linnebjerg
Anita Ekman Hansen
Troels Reinholdt Møller
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Apr;64(4)
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis
Hearing Tests - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Neonatal Screening
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
In 2005, a nationwide programme on hearing screening in newborns was launched in Denmark. The purpose of the programme was to ensure early detection of hearing loss in newborns and to institute subsequent treatment. The aim of this study was to assess whether the Central Denmark Region observes the guidelines of the Danish Health and Medicines Authority (DHMA) for neonatal hearing. In addition, we wanted to identify factors that may influence screening density positively or negatively.
Data were collected retrospectively from patient record forms completed in the 2006-2014 period. For selected periods, patient record forms were examined man-ually.
We recorded an annual increase in average screening density; from 88.6% in 2006 to 94.8% in 2013. Furthermore, in 2006, 89.5% had completed the hearing screening programme within 30 days and in 2014 this figure had increased to 99%. The average time to diagnosis decreased from 3.5 months in 2006 to 0.7 months in 2013. A strike among healthcare professionals in 2008 and the launch of electronic patient record (EPJ) forms in 2012 had a negative impact on screening density. Due to EPJ errors, the hearing screening density occasionally appeared to be lower than the actual number of newborns screened. In contrast, advanced training of primary screening staff, the establishment of close relations with the primary screening units in hospitals and the implementation of "Maternity packages" improved screening density.
Based on our results, our conclusion is that the Central Denmark Region observes the DHMA guidelines on neonatal hearing screening in Denmark.
none.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
28385167 View in PubMed
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Maternal Body Mass Index in Early Pregnancy and Risk of Epilepsy in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284116
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):668-676
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Neda Razaz
Kristina Tedroff
Eduardo Villamor
Sven Cnattingius
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):668-676
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Male
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Overweight - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is growing concern about the long-term neurologic effects of prenatal exposure to maternal overweight and obesity. The causes of epilepsy are poorly understood and, in more than 60% of the patients, no definitive cause can be determined.
To investigate the association between early pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and the risk of childhood epilepsy and examine associations between obesity-related pregnancy and neonatal complications and risks of childhood epilepsy.
A population-based cohort study of 1?441?623 live single births at 22 or more completed gestational weeks in Sweden from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2011, was conducted. The diagnosis of epilepsy as well as obesity-related pregnancy and neonatal complications were based on information from the Sweden Medical Birth Register and National Patient Register. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs after adjusting for maternal age, country of origin, educational level, cohabitation with partner, height, smoking, maternal epilepsy, and year of delivery. Data analysis was conducted from June 1 to December 15, 2016.
Risk of childhood epilepsy.
Of the 1?421?551 children born between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2011, with covariate information available, 7592 (0.5%) were diagnosed with epilepsy through December 31, 2012. Of these 3530 (46.5%) were female. The overall incidence of epilepsy in children aged 28 days to 16 years was 6.79 per 10?000 child-years. Compared with offspring of normal-weight mothers (BMI 18.5 to
PubMed ID
28384785 View in PubMed
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Common genetic variants are associated with lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations across the year among children at northern latitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284117
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(6):829-838
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Rikke A Petersen
Lesli H Larsen
Camilla T Damsgaard
Louise B Sørensen
Mads F Hjorth
Rikke Andersen
Inge Tetens
Henrik Krarup
Christian Ritz
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Christian Mølgaard
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(6):829-838
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Child
Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase - genetics
Cytochrome P450 Family 2 - genetics
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Schools
Seasons
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - genetics
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics
Abstract
In a longitudinal study including 642 healthy 8-11-year-old Danish children, we investigated associations between vitamin D dependent SNP and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations across a school year (August-June). Serum 25(OH)D was measured three times for every child, which approximated measurements in three seasons (autumn, winter, spring). Dietary and supplement intake, physical activity, BMI and parathyroid hormone were likewise measured at each time point. In all, eleven SNP in four vitamin D-related genes: Cytochrome P450 subfamily IIR1 (CYP2R1); 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase-1(DHCR7/NADSYN1); group-specific complement (GC); and vitamin D receptor were genotyped. We found minor alleles of CYP2R1 rs10500804, and of GC rs4588 and rs7041 to be associated with lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations across the three seasons (all P
PubMed ID
28382877 View in PubMed
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Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer in a Prospective Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284118
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2017 03 01;109(3):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-01-2017
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Edward L Giovannucci
Alicja Wolk
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2017 03 01;109(3):1-3
Date
03-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coffee
Drinking
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Evidence indicates that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gallstone disease, which is strongly associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer. The association between coffee consumption and gallbladder cancer incidence was examined in a prospective cohort study of 72 680 Swedish adults (aged 45?-?83 years) who were free of cancer and reported their coffee consumption at baseline. Gallbladder cancers were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Statistical tests were two-sided. During 967 377 person-years of follow-up, 74 gallbladder cancer case patients were identified. Compared with consumption of one or less cups of coffee per day, the multivariable hazard ratios were 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41 to 1.41) for two cups per day, 0.50 (95% CI?=?0.24 to 1.06) for three cups per day, and 0.41 (95% CI?=?0.20 to 0.83) for four or more cups per day. In conclusion, coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of gallbladder cancer.
PubMed ID
28376203 View in PubMed
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Umbilical cord blood androgen levels in girls and boys assessed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284119
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2017 Jul;171:195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Anna-Carin Lundell
Henrik Ryberg
Liesbeth Vandenput
Anna Rudin
Claes Ohlsson
Åsa Tivesten
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2017 Jul;171:195-200
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Androgens - blood
Androstenedione - blood
Dehydroepiandrosterone - blood
Dihydrotestosterone - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Limit of Detection
Male
Pregnancy
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Characteristics
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Sweden
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
Androgen exposure of the fetus during gestation plays an important role in human physiology and pathophysiology, but assessment of androgens, in particular dihydrotestosterone (DHT), in human umbilical cord blood is technically challenging. The aim of this study was to assess umbilical cord androgen levels, including DHT, at birth by a highly sensitive assay, and study their association with sex of the infant, sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, and gestational age at delivery. Swedish infants (27 girls, 26 boys) were recruited at maternity care clinics in Southern Sweden. Umbilical cord blood levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione, testosterone and DHT at delivery were assessed by a gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Cord blood levels of DHT were 2.4-fold higher in boys (median 27.8pg/mL) than in girls (11.5pg/mL), while the sex difference was less pronounced for testosterone (1.3-fold higher in boys) and non-significant for DHEA and androstenedione. Gestational age at delivery associated inversely with DHT levels in boys and with DHEA levels in girls. There was a strong inverse correlation between SHBG and DHEA in both sexes, while there were no associations between SHBG and testosterone or DHT levels. In conclusion, using state of the art technology, we report that there is a pronounced sexual dimorphism in human umbilical cord blood DHT levels. The possibility to assess a complete androgen profile in human cord blood opens up for future increased understanding of the biological impact of the fetal androgen milieu.
PubMed ID
28373106 View in PubMed
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Structural Reorganization of the Thyroid Gland in Males of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) Depending on Ethnicity and Climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284120
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2017 Mar;162(5):690-692
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
D K Garmaeva
A I Egorova
E L Lushnikova
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2017 Mar;162(5):690-692
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Climate
Ethnic Groups
Humans
Male
Organ Size
Russia
Seasons
Thyroid Gland - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses showed season-dependent changes in the morphofunctional parameters of the structural components of the thyroid gland in males of indigenous (Yakuts, Evens, and Evenkis) and non-indigenous (Russian and Ukrainians) populations of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) in different seasons. External and internal diameters of follicles and area of the colloid in the thyroid gland was higher in non-indigenous than in non-indigenous individuals both in summer and in winter. The height of thyroid epithelium, areas of thyrocytes and their nuclei, and nucleocytoplasmic index of the thyroid gland were lower in men from non-indigenous population in summer, and higher in winter than in non-indigenous inhabitants. Transition of a part of follicular apparatus of the thyroid gland to enhanced activity during winter was less pronounced in indigenous males in comparison with non-indigenous subjects.
PubMed ID
28361413 View in PubMed
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Whole-Grain Intake, Reflected by Dietary Records and Biomarkers, Is Inversely Associated with Circulating Insulin and Other Cardiometabolic Markers in 8- to 11-Year-Old Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284121
Source
J Nutr. 2017 May;147(5):816-824
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Kim F Michaelsen
Mads V Lind
Arne Astrup
Rikard Landberg
Source
J Nutr. 2017 May;147(5):816-824
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adiposity
Age Factors
Avena - chemistry
Biomarkers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Child
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Edible Grain
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Obesity - blood
Resorcinols - blood
Risk
Secale - chemistry
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
Background: Whole-grain consumption seems to be cardioprotective in adults, but evidence in children is limited.Objective: We investigated whether intakes of total whole grain and dietary fiber as well as specific whole grains were associated with fat mass and cardiometabolic risk profile in children.Methods: We collected cross-sectional data on parental education, puberty, diet by 7-d records, and physical activity by accelerometry and measured anthropometry, fat mass index by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and blood pressure in 713 Danish children aged 8-11 y. Fasting blood samples were obtained and analyzed for alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triacylglycerols, insulin, and glucose. Linear mixed models included puberty, parental education, physical activity, and intakes of energy, fruit and vegetables, saturated fat, and n-3 (?-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids.Results: Median (IQR) whole-grain and dietary fiber intakes were 52 g/d (35-72 g/d) and 17 g/d (14-22 g/d), respectively. Fourteen percent of children were overweight or obese and most had low-risk cardiometabolic profiles. Dietary whole-grain and fiber intakes were not associated with fat mass index but were inversely associated with serum insulin [both P
PubMed ID
28356426 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vulvar carcinoma in Norway: A 50-year perspective on trends in incidence, treatment and survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284122
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Jun;145(3):543-548
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Christin Julia Meltzer-Gunnes
Milada Cvancarova Småstuen
Gunnar Balle Kristensen
Claes Göran Tropé
Agnes Kathrine Lie
Ingvild Vistad
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Jun;145(3):543-548
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore trends in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) incidence, age and stage at diagnosis, treatment and survival in Norway from 1961 to 2010.
From 1961 to 2010, 2233 cases of vulvar SCC were extracted from the Cancer Registry of Norway. Data on age at diagnosis, tumor morphology, stage of the disease and treatment were analyzed. Age-standardized incidence rates, adjusted to the Norwegian standard population, were computed. Relative survival was calculated as a ratio of the observed survival in the study population over the expected survival in the background population. Multivariate Cox model was fitted to estimate hazard ratios.
The overall incidence of vulvar SCC increased >2.5 fold (from 1.70 to 4.66 per 100,000 women/year; P
PubMed ID
28356187 View in PubMed
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23441 records – page 1 of 1173.