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Is There a Scale-up Penalty? Testing Behavioral Change in the Scaling up of Parent Management Training in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289847
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2017 Mar; 44(2):203-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Truls Tommeraas
Terje Ogden
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Child Behavior Development, P.O. Box 7053, Majorstuen, 0306, Oslo, Norway. trulstom@atferdssenteret.no.
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2017 Mar; 44(2):203-216
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavior Therapy - education - methods
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - therapy
Child, Preschool
Evidence-Based Practice - methods
Female
Humans
Infant
Information Dissemination - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study, the scaling up of Parent Management Training, Oregon Model (PMTO) in Norway was examined by investigating how large-scale dissemination affected the composition of the target group and the service providers by comparing child behavioral outcomes in the effectiveness and dissemination phases of implementation. Despite the larger heterogeneity of the service providers and the intake characteristics of the target group, which are contrary to the expectations that were derived from the literature, no attenuation of program effects was detected when scaling up PMTO. In Norway, a long-term-funded centralized center, combined with an active implementation strategy, seems to have affected the quality of PMTO delivered system-wide in services for children with behavior problems.
Notes
Cites: Am Psychol. 2010 Feb-Mar;65(2):73-84 PMID 20141263
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Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2013 Mar;51(3):113-21 PMID 23318242
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Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2013 Dec;81(6):1010-20 PMID 23895086
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2001 Jan;20(1 Suppl):63-70 PMID 11146262
PubMed ID
26715496 View in PubMed
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Survival and its predictors from age 75 to 85 in men and women belonging to cohorts with marked survival differences to age 75: a comparative study in three Nordic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289848
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jun; 28(3):541-50
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
E Heikkinen
M Kauppinen
M Schroll
B Steen
P Era
Author Affiliation
University of Jyvaskyla, Gerontology Research Center, Jyvaskyla, Finland. eino.heikkinen@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jun; 28(3):541-50
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness
Prospective Studies
Survival
Sweden
Abstract
While predictors of survival in older people have been examined in depth in a large number of studies, a literature search revealed no cross-national comparative prospective cohort studies on this issue. This study investigated survival and its predictors from age 75 to 85 among three local Nordic populations using survival data on national cohorts as background information.
The data were derived from national registers and from samples of 75-year old living in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. The subjects were invited to take part in interviews and examinations focusing on different domains of health, functional capacity, and physical and social activities.
The proportion of survivors to age 75 was markedly smaller among the Finnish men and women than Danish or Swedish subjects. In the local population no marked differences in survival from age 75 to 85 were observed between the groups of men, while women survived longer than men and longer in Göteborg than in Glostrup or Jyväskylä. Univariate models revealed 12 predictors of survival. In the multivariate models, the significant predictors among men related to physical fitness, whereas among women they pertained to social activities and morbidity.
Despite great differences in the proportions of survivors to age 75, and excepting the survival advantage of women, only minor differences were present in the subjects' further survival to age 85. In the univariate analyses, many of the factors predictive of survival from age 75 to 85 were the same in the examined populations, whereas in the multivariate analyses differences between the sexes emerged.
PubMed ID
26254793 View in PubMed
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Factors facilitating patient satisfaction among women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue: A relational perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289849
Source
Health (London). 2016 05; 20(3):308-26
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2016
Author
Olaug S Lian
Anne Helen Hansen
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Norway olaug.lian@uit.no.
Source
Health (London). 2016 05; 20(3):308-26
Date
05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Continuity of Patient Care
Fatigue - psychology - therapy
Female
General practitioners
Humans
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Referral and Consultation
Women's health
Abstract
Bodily conditions that are difficult to identify, explain and treat with the aid of medical knowledge and technology appear to be particularly challenging to medical encounters. Patients are often dissatisfied with the help they receive, and they often experience that their medical needs are not met. To explore factors facilitating patient satisfaction among patients with a medically unexplained condition, we ask: what is the importance of individual versus relational factors in facilitating patient satisfaction in clinical encounters between general practitioners (GPs) and women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue? We approach this question through a statistical analysis of survey data collected from a net sample of 431 women recruited through a patient organisation for people suffering from myalgic encephalomyelitis in 2013. Participants were asked about their experiences with general practitioners in the Norwegian national health system in two different phases: shortly after illness onset, and current regular general practitioner last 12?months. The questions evolved around themes concerning shared understanding and decision making, being taken seriously, being paid due respect and being treated as an equal partner. Through descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses, we explored how their experiences were related to individual and relational factors, respectively. Free-text comments from the questionnaires were used while interpreting the results. The analysis illuminates that relational aspects in medical encounters between GPs and ME patients, especially continuity, congruence in doctor-patient views and being seen by a specialist, are important catalysts of patient satisfaction. The probability of being satisfied with the initial investigation was more than six times higher in women who were referred to specialists, compared to those who were not. We conclude that continuity of care and experiences of being in a partnership that operates on a common ground - a shared understanding of the patient's illness - foster patient satisfaction among women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue.
PubMed ID
25979224 View in PubMed
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Assessing Adolescent Anxiety in General Psychiatric Care: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Swedish Self-Report and Parent Versions of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289850
Source
Assessment. 2016 Dec; 23(6):744-757
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Susanne Olofsdotter
Karin Sonnby
Sofia Vadlin
Tomas Furmark
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden susanne.olofsdotter@ltv.se.
Source
Assessment. 2016 Dec; 23(6):744-757
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - methods
Anxiety - diagnosis
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Male
Parents - psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sweden
Abstract
This study examined the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the Swedish translations of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, self- and parent report versions, in a sample of 104 adolescents presenting at two general psychiatric outpatient units. Results showed high informant agreement and good internal reliability and concurrent and discriminant validity for both versions and demonstrated that this scale can distinguish between adolescents with and without an anxiety disorder in a non-anxiety-specific clinical setting. The relative clinical utility of different cutoff scores was compared by looking at the extent to which dichotomized questionnaire results altered the pretest probability of the presence of a diagnosis as defined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. Optimized for screening and diagnostic purposes in Sweden, cutoff scores obtained in the current study outperformed a previously identified cutoff score derived from an Australian community sample. The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale is a useful clinical instrument for the assessment of anxiety in adolescents.
PubMed ID
25934162 View in PubMed
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Engaging Elements of Cancer-Related Digital Stories in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289851
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
09-2016
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura Revels
Nancy E Schoenberg
Anne Lanier
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Community Health Aide Program, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. mcueva@anthc.org.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Communication
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The tradition of storytelling is an integral part of Alaska Native cultures that continues to be a way of passing on knowledge. Using a story-based approach to share cancer education is grounded in Alaska Native traditions and people's experiences and has the potential to positively impact cancer knowledge, understandings, and wellness choices. Community health workers (CHWs) in Alaska created a personal digital story as part of a 5-day, in-person cancer education course. To identify engaging elements of digital stories among Alaska Native people, one focus group was held in each of three different Alaska communities with a total of 29 adult participants. After viewing CHWs' digital stories created during CHW cancer education courses, focus group participants commented verbally and in writing about cultural relevance, engaging elements, information learned, and intent to change health behavior. Digital stories were described by Alaska focus group participants as being culturally respectful, informational, inspiring, and motivational. Viewers shared that they liked digital stories because they were short (only 2-3 min); nondirective and not preachy; emotional, told as a personal story and not just facts and figures; and relevant, using photos that showed Alaskan places and people.
Notes
Cites: Menopause Int. 2010 Jun;16(2):51-5 PMID 20729493
Cites: J Cancer Surviv. 2008 Mar;2(1):33-44 PMID 18648985
Cites: Educ Prim Care. 2009 Nov;20(6):441-4 PMID 20132639
Cites: Med Teach. 2008;30(8):774-7 PMID 18946821
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23984267
Cites: Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):61-9, 83 PMID 11710084
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2004;25:439-55 PMID 15015929
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2003 Nov-Dec;27 Suppl 3:S227-32 PMID 14672383
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):6-11 PMID 11776018
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):617-23 PMID 23099660
PubMed ID
25865400 View in PubMed
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[Nutrition value of national milk products with the addition of wild berries and wild food plants of Yakutia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289852
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2015
Author
U M Lebedeva
A F Abramov
K M Stepanov
V T Vasilyeva
A A Efimova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cultured Milk Products - analysis
Eating
Female
Food analysis
Fruit
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Siberia
Abstract
Results of an assessment of the actual food of the population in various medicoeconomic zones of the republic (industrial, agricultural, Arctic) by method of the frequency analysis of food consumption are presented in the article. The analysis of control of compliance of quality and safety of foodstuff in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), according to requirements of the legislation of the Russian Federation, acts of the Customs union has been made. Decreased consumption of such foodstuff as milk, fish and meat products including products from local food staples and national dishes has been established. The data obtained are medic-biological justification for search of ways of optimization of population nutrition, creation of specialized products with a functional purpose and for the prevention of the states and diseases connected with nutrition violation. They also define innovative development of the republic in questions of biotechnologies of the production of specialized foods for various groups of the population. Results of chemical composition research of the most used wild-growing food plants of Yakutia are given. The questions connected with the nutrition and biological value of the dairy products of a functional purpose with use of wild-growing food herbs and berries of Yakutia are discussed.
PubMed ID
29378108 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cinnamon rolls are not associated with admission for toxic or alcoholic hepatitis in a Danish liver referral centre].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289853
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Dec 08; 176(50):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-08-2014
Author
Henning Gr Ønbæk
Mette Borre
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk Hepatogastroenterologisk Afdeling V, Aarhus Universitetshospital, N ørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C. henngroe@rm.dk.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Dec 08; 176(50):
Date
Dec-08-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Bread - adverse effects
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury - etiology
Cinnamomum zeylanicum - adverse effects
Coumarins - adverse effects
Denmark
Female
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - etiology
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Abstract
Cinnamon contains cumarin, which may be toxic to the liver. EU-regulations standardardize the amount of cinnamon in pastry including cinnamon rolls. The aim of the study was to investigate if cinnamon intake from pastry was associated with toxic or alcoholic hepatitis.
We registered 58 patients with toxic hepatitis, 38 (66%) women and 20 (34%) men with a median age of 51 (range: 32-80) and 53 (range: 18-78) years, respectively. A total of 22 patients had primarily cholestasis and 36 had hepatitis biochemically. The duration of toxic liver disease from admission to normalization of liver enzymes was similar in the two groups (3.5 ± 3.5 vs 3.6 ± 3.5 months). Toxic hepatitis was most often caused by drugs e.g. NSAID (n = 15; 26%), antibiotics (n = 9; 16%), alternative medicine (n = 7; 12%) and Antabuse (n = 5; 9%). We registered eight patients admitted with severe alcoholic hepatitis, five men and three women, median age of 60 (range: 34-67) years. Alcoholic hepatitis was associated with high alcohol intake. None of the patients with toxic or alcoholic hepatitis reported of excessive intake of cinnamon rolls and there was no evidence of cinnamon added to alcohol of alternative medicine products.
Intake of cinnamon from cinnamon rolls is not associated with admission for toxic or alcoholic hepatitis. However, for the diagnosis of toxic liver diseases including alcohol it is very important to have patient information regarding any new drugs, alternative medicine and alcohol intake. Further, other causes of liver diseases should be excluded.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25498179 View in PubMed
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Co-Occurrence of ODD and CD in Preschool Children With Symptoms of ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289854
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Jul; 21(9):741-752
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Bothild Bendiksen
Elisabeth Svensson
Heidi Aase
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Svein Friis
Anne M Myhre
Pål Zeiner
Author Affiliation
1 Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Jul; 21(9):741-752
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
Patterns of co-occurrence between ADHD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and Conduct Disorder (CD) were examined in a sample of non-referred preschool children. ADHD subtypes and sex differences were also explored.
Children aged 3.5 years ( n = 1,048) with high scores on ADHD characteristics were recruited from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and clinically assessed, including a semi-structured psychiatric interview.
In children with ADHD, concurrent ODD was present more often than CD (31% vs. 10%), but having ADHD gave higher increase in the odds of CD than of ODD (ODD: odds ratio [OR] = 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [4.2, 10.8]; CD: OR = 17.6, 95% CI = [5.9, 52.9]). We found a greater proportion of children having the combined ADHD subtype as well as more severe inattentiveness among children with co-occurring CD compared with ODD. Sex differences were minor.
There are important differences in co-occurring patterns of ODD and CD in preschool children with ADHD.
PubMed ID
24994876 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abuse in rural Alaska: 1980-1981 study, Kotzebue, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289855
Source
State Office of Alcoholism
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1981
Author
Albrecht, C. Earl
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska
Source
State Office of Alcoholism
Date
June 1981
Language
English
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Drinking of alcoholic beverages
Kotzebue
Alaska Natives alcohol use
Alcoholism and crime
Notes
UAA RARE HV5298.K67 A48 1981
Less detail
Source
Division of Nursing and Maternal and Child Health
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1951
Author
Alaska Department of Health
Source
Division of Nursing and Maternal and Child Health
Date
1951
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Fairbanks
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Midwives
Maternity nursing
Notes
RG 961.A55 A52
Based on principles of mother and baby care outlines in the U.S. Children's Bureau 'Manual for teaching midwives' by Anita M. Jones
RG 961.A55 A52 1955
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Tribal health plan: Copper River Native Association Health Department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289857
Source
Copper River Native Association, Health Dept. 80 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1979
Author
Don Bantz & Associates.
Source
Copper River Native Association, Health Dept. 80 pages.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Copper River Region
Public Health
Indians of North America
Health and hygiene
Rural Health Services
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4C67 1979
Less detail

Copper River Native Association (CRNA) integrated behavioral health services plan

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289858
Source
Copper River Native Association ; University of Alaska Anchorage. 42 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1999
Source
Copper River Native Association ; University of Alaska Anchorage. 42 pages.
Date
1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Copper River Region
Public Health
Indians of North America
Health and Hygiene
Rural Health Services
Mental health services
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4C672 1999
Less detail

Copper River health needs assessment strategic plan: final report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289859
Source
Anchorage : University of Alaska, Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies. 1 v. (various pagings)
Publication Type
Report
Date
2004
Source
Anchorage : University of Alaska, Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies. 1 v. (various pagings)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Copper River Region
Regional Medical Programs
Public Health
Rural Health Services
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4C677 2004
Prepared for the Copper River Health Needs Assessment Research Committee under a contract with Copper River Native Association with support from the Denali Commission.
CRHNA study strategic plan.
Less detail

A development plan for comprehensive health care in the Yukon-Kuskokwim area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289860
Source
Alaska : Arthur D. Little Inc. ; Lester Gorsline Associates. 2 v.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1972
Source
Alaska : Arthur D. Little Inc. ; Lester Gorsline Associates. 2 v.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Yukon-Kuskokwim Region
Medical care
Public Health
Health planning
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4D49 1972 vol.1
On cover: YT nautlunringtlerkiat.
v.1. Development plan for comprehensive health care -- v. 2. Health status.
Less detail

Serious health problems in Alaska: a survey report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289861
Source
Juneau : Alaska Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Planning. 35 leaves.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1985
Author
Dilley, Marti.
Source
Juneau : Alaska Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Planning. 35 leaves.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Alaska
Health Surveys
Public Health
Public Opinion
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RA447.A4D53 1985
UAF - ALASKA RA407.A4D55 1985
Less detail

Directory of health, social services and related resources in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289862
Source
Anchorage : Easter Seal Society for Alaska Crippled Children and Adults. v.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Anchorage : Easter Seal Society for Alaska Crippled Children and Adults. v.
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Public Health
Public welfare
Directories
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4D57 1975
Less detail

From health plan to health program: an examination of the 1122 review process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289863
Source
55 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1977
Author
Dorman, William Kyle.
Source
55 pages.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Health planning
Federal aid to health facilities
Glenmore Nursing Care Center (Anchorage, Alaska)
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4D67 1977
Less detail

Rhachotropis (Eusiroidea, Amphipoda) from the North East Atlantic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289864
Source
Zookeys. 2018; (731):75-101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Anne-Nina Lörz
Anne Helene S Tandberg
Endre Willassen
Amy Driskell
Author Affiliation
University of Hamburg, CeNak, Centre of Natural History, Zoological Museum, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.
Source
Zookeys. 2018; (731):75-101
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The genus Rhachotropis has the widest geographic and bathymetric distribution of all amphipod genera worldwide. Molecular and morphological investigations of specimens sampled around Iceland and off the Norwegian coast allow the first insights into the relationships of North East Atlantic Rhachotropis. The 31 cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences generated for this study were assigned 13 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) in the Barcode of Life database (BOLD), of which 12 are new to the database. Molecular analyses of COI and 16S sequences could not confirm a theory that depth has a greater influence on the phylogeny of Rhachotropis than geographic distance. Although the North East Atlantic is a well-studied area, our molecular investigations revealed the genus Rhachotropis may contain cryptic species, which indicates a higher biodiversity than currently known. For example, the specimens which key to Rhachotropis helleri is a complex of three COI clades, two of which cannot be identified with morphological traits. One specimen of each of the clades in the cladogram was documented by high definition photographs. A special focus was on the visual morphology of the eyes, as this character shows interspecific differences within the genus Rhachotropis in response to fixation in ethanol. Detailed morphological investigation showed that some clades thought to be indistinguishable can be separated by minute but consistent morphological characters. Datamining Genbank to examine all registered COI-sequences of R. aculeata, the only previously known Rhachotropis BIN in the North Atlantic and sub-Arctic, showed R. aculeata to be subdivided by an Arctic and a North Atlantic population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29472763 View in PubMed
Less detail

Draft Genome Sequence of an Extracellular Protease-Producing Bacterium, Stenotrophomonas bentonitica VV6, Isolated from Arctic Seawater.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289865
Source
Genome Announc. 2018 Feb 22; 6(8):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-22-2018
Author
Ming-Xia Chen
He-Yang Li
Xiao-Sheng Ye
Xiao-Yu He
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioengineering and Biotechnology, Huaqiao University, Fujian, Xiamen, China chenmx1257@163.com heyang_li@tio.org.cn.
Source
Genome Announc. 2018 Feb 22; 6(8):
Date
Feb-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The draft genome sequence of the extracellular protease-producing bacterium Stenotrophomonas bentonitica VV6, isolated from Arctic seawater, was established. The genome size was approximately 4.365?Mb, with a G+C content of 66.54%, and it contains 3,871 predicted protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and 60 tRNAs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29472346 View in PubMed
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Draft Genome Sequence of Methylocella silvestris TVC, a Facultative Methanotroph Isolated from Permafrost.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289866
Source
Genome Announc. 2018 Feb 22; 6(8):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-22-2018
Author
Jing Wang
Kan Geng
Muhammad Farhan Ul Haque
Andrew Crombie
Lorna E Street
Philip A Wookey
Ke Ma
J Colin Murrell
Jennifer Pratscher
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
Source
Genome Announc. 2018 Feb 22; 6(8):
Date
Feb-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Permafrost environments play a crucial role in global carbon and methane cycling. We report here the draft genome sequence of Methylocella silvestris TVC, a new facultative methanotroph strain, isolated from the Siksik Creek catchment in the continuous permafrost zone of Inuvik (Northwest Territories, Canada).
Notes
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PubMed ID
29472327 View in PubMed
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