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You sneeze, you lose:: The impact of pollen exposure on cognitive performance during high-stakes high school exams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289992
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Sep; 49:1-13
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Simon Søbstad Bensnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 1, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: simon.bensnes@ntnu.no.
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Sep; 49:1-13
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Allergens
Cognition
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Pollen
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - psychology
Abstract
Pollen is known to cause allergic reactions and affect cognitive performance in around 20% of the population. Although pollen season peaks when students take high-stakes exams, the effect of pollen allergies on school performance has received nearly no attention from economists. Using a student fixed effects model and administrative Norwegian data, this paper finds that increasing the ambient pollen levels by one standard deviation at the mean leads to a 2.5% standard deviation decrease in test scores, with potentially larger effects for allergic students. There also appear to be longer-run effects. The findings imply that random increases in pollen counts reduce test scores for allergic students relative to their peers, who consequently will be at a disadvantage when competing for jobs or higher education. This paper contributes to the literature by illuminating the interplay between individual health and human capital accumulation, which in turn can impact long-run economic growth.
PubMed ID
27315202 View in PubMed
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Hypertension, the Swedish Patient Register, and Selection Bias-Reply.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289993
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 06 01; 176(6):863
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
06-01-2016
Author
Casey Crump
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 06 01; 176(6):863
Date
06-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Humans
Hypertension
Registries
Selection Bias
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Feb;176(2):210-6 PMID 26784837
CommentOn: JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Jun 1;176(6):862-3 PMID 27273487
PubMed ID
27273489 View in PubMed
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Medicaid Coverage and Access to Care for American Indians and Alaska Natives Under the Affordable Care Act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289994
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 06 01; 176(6):860-1
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
06-01-2016
Author
Samantha Artiga
Barbara Lyons
Author Affiliation
The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC.
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 06 01; 176(6):860-1
Date
06-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicaid
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
United States
Notes
CommentOn: JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Jun 1;176(6):858-60 PMID 27182901
PubMed ID
27182790 View in PubMed
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The Dark Side of Internet Use: Two Longitudinal Studies of Excessive Internet Use, Depressive Symptoms, School Burnout and Engagement Among Finnish Early and Late Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289995
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2017 02; 46(2):343-357
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2017
Author
Katariina Salmela-Aro
Katja Upadyaya
Kai Hakkarainen
Kirsti Lonka
Kimmo Alho
Author Affiliation
Cicero Learning, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. katariina.salmela-aro@helsinki.fi.
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2017 02; 46(2):343-357
Date
02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Depression - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Internet
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental health
Psychology, Adolescent
Schools
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent research shows an increased concern with well-being at school and potential problems associated with students' use of socio-digital technologies, i.e., the mobile devices, computers, social media, and the Internet. Simultaneously with supporting creative social activities, socio-digital participation may also lead to compulsive and addictive behavioral patterns affecting both general and school-related mental health problems. Using two longitudinal data waves gathered among 1702 (53 % female) early (age 12-14) and 1636 (64 % female) late (age 16-18) Finnish adolescents, we examined cross-lagged paths between excessive internet use, school engagement and burnout, and depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling revealed reciprocal cross-lagged paths between excessive internet use and school burnout among both adolescent groups: school burnout predicted later excessive internet use and excessive internet use predicted later school burnout. Reciprocal paths between school burnout and depressive symptoms were also found. Girls typically suffered more than boys from depressive symptoms and, in late adolescence, school burnout. Boys, in turn, more typically suffered from excessive internet use. These results show that, among adolescents, excessive internet use can be a cause of school burnout that can later spill over to depressive symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27138172 View in PubMed
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A general method for decomposing the causes of socioeconomic inequality in health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289996
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Jul; 48:89-106
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Gawain Heckley
Ulf-G Gerdtham
Gustav Kjellsson
Author Affiliation
Health Economics & Management, Institute of Economic Research, Lund University, Box 117, 22100, Sweden; Health Economics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Medicon Village, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: Gawain.heckley@med.lu.se.
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Jul; 48:89-106
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Income
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
We introduce a general decomposition method applicable to all forms of bivariate rank dependent indices of socioeconomic inequality in health, including the concentration index. The technique is based on recentered influence function regression and requires only the application of OLS to a transformed variable with similar interpretation. Our method requires few identifying assumptions to yield valid estimates in most common empirical applications, unlike current methods favoured in the literature. Using the Swedish Twin Registry and a within twin pair fixed effects identification strategy, our new method finds no evidence of a causal effect of education on income-related health inequality.
PubMed ID
27137844 View in PubMed
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Mercury and methylmercury in aquatic sediment across western North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289997
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15; 568:727-738
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-15-2016
Author
Jacob A Fleck
Mark Marvin-DiPasquale
Collin A Eagles-Smith
Joshua T Ackerman
Michelle A Lutz
Michael Tate
Charles N Alpers
Britt D Hall
David P Krabbenhoft
Chris S Eckley
Author Affiliation
United States Geological Survey, California Water Science Center, 6000 J St., Placer Hall, Sacramento, CA 95819, USA. Electronic address: jafleck@usgs.gov.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15; 568:727-738
Date
Oct-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Mercury - analysis
Methylmercury compounds - analysis
Northwest Territories
Northwestern United States
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Large-scale assessments are valuable in identifying primary factors controlling total mercury (THg) and monomethyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations, and distribution in aquatic ecosystems. Bed sediment THg and MeHg concentrations were compiled for >16,000 samples collected from aquatic habitats throughout the West between 1965 and 2013. The influence of aquatic feature type (canals, estuaries, lakes, and streams), and environmental setting (agriculture, forest, open-water, range, wetland, and urban) on THg and MeHg concentrations was examined. THg concentrations were highest in lake (29.3±6.5µgkg(-1)) and canal (28.6±6.9µgkg(-1)) sites, and lowest in stream (20.7±4.6µgkg(-1)) and estuarine (23.6±5.6µgkg(-1)) sites, which was partially a result of differences in grain size related to hydrologic gradients. By environmental setting, open-water (36.8±2.2µgkg(-1)) and forested (32.0±2.7µgkg(-1)) sites generally had the highest THg concentrations, followed by wetland sites (28.9±1.7µgkg(-1)), rangeland (25.5±1.5µgkg(-1)), agriculture (23.4±2.0µgkg(-1)), and urban (22.7±2.1µgkg(-1)) sites. MeHg concentrations also were highest in lakes (0.55±0.05µgkg(-1)) and canals (0.54±0.11µgkg(-1)), but, in contrast to THg, MeHg concentrations were lowest in open-water sites (0.22±0.03µgkg(-1)). The median percent MeHg (relative to THg) for the western region was 0.7%, indicating an overall low methylation efficiency; however, a significant subset of data (n>100) had percentages that represent elevated methylation efficiency (>6%). MeHg concentrations were weakly correlated with THg (r(2)=0.25) across western North America. Overall, these results highlight the large spatial variability in sediment THg and MeHg concentrations throughout western North America and underscore the important roles that landscape and land-use characteristics have on the MeHg cycle.
PubMed ID
27130329 View in PubMed
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Understanding eldercare users' views on quality of care and strategies for dealing with problems in Swedish home help services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289998
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2017 Mar; 25(2):621-629
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Kristina Westerberg
Jan Hjelte
Sara Josefsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2017 Mar; 25(2):621-629
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Focus Groups
Geriatric Nursing
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Peer Group
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of eldercare users' strategies for dealing with problems in the quality of care and care satisfaction in relation to home help services. Based on earlier research and evaluations, it was assumed that users would express satisfaction and gratitude, and also be unwilling to complain. The specific research questions were: (i) What, if any, quality of care problems do the users mention? (ii) How do the users explain the reasons for these problems? and (iii) What strategies do the users employ to deal with these problems? A total of 35 interviews were conducted in November 2013 with 15 men and 20 women (66-92 years). The data were analysed using thematic and qualitative content analysis. The results showed that almost all users expressed overall satisfaction with their care. However, all but one also mentioned problems. The users stated very clearly and explicitly the reasons for these problems, and in most cases, they referred to the work conditions, work organisation and lack of other resources in the eldercare organisation. Two strategies were commonly used to deal with these problems: trivialisation and adaptation. A third strategy was expressed dissatisfaction, where the problem led to actions or plans to take action. One interpretation of the findings is that what is actually measured in official quality assessments and follow-ups may be care users' understanding of the work conditions and work organisation of eldercare. The understanding attitude may prevent care users from complaining because it lowers their expectations.
PubMed ID
27109545 View in PubMed
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Negotiating the care-giving role: family members' experience during critical exacerbation of COPD in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289999
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2017 Mar; 25(2):612-620
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Gunvor Aasbø
Jorun Rugkåsa
Kari N Solbraekke
Anne Werner
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2017 Mar; 25(2):612-620
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Female
Geriatric Nursing - standards
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - physiopathology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
Healthcare policies often state that complex conditions are to be treated outside hospital in various forms of public-private partnership. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive illness that includes episodes of serious acute exacerbations characterised by extreme breathlessness. There is limited knowledge about COPD exacerbations from the perspective of family caregivers and implications of the changing boundary between hospital care and care at home. In this paper, we explore how caregivers negotiate their role as caregivers with patients and healthcare professionals during acute exacerbations. We conducted 10 qualitative interviews with family caregivers of COPD patients in 2011, all were spouses over the age of 60. The participants were recruited through the patient pool of ambulatory pulmonary services of two hospitals in Oslo, Norway. Data were interpreted using thematic analysis. The caregivers described a lack of understanding and support from health professionals in some situations. They shouldered considerable responsibility, but were not always acknowledged as competent carers by professionals. Caregivers had to balance their involvement. They noted that they could lose the professionals' co-operation if their involvement was perceived as interfering or preventing the professionals from exercising their expertise. However, by not sharing their personalised knowledge about the patients, they risked that the professionals would not understand the severity of the exacerbation, which could undermine their own ability to maintain a sense of safety and control. The negotiations caregivers participated in and the uncertainty they experienced shed new light on the complexity of their role, and the discrepancy between practice and ideals in healthcare policy regarding collaboration of care. It is crucial to develop further knowledge about structural, interactional and communicational facilitators and barriers for reaching shared understandings and facilitating mutual trust in these demanding situations.
PubMed ID
27103468 View in PubMed
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Disclosure of Type 1 diabetes at work among Finnish workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290000
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):115-119
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017
Author
P Hakkarainen
L Moilanen
V Hänninen
K Räsänen
F Munir
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):115-119
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Combined Modality Therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology - therapy
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychosocial Support Systems
Self Disclosure
Self-Management
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine which self-management factors and psychosocial work factors were associated with disclosing diabetes to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel among workers with Type 1 diabetes.
A total of 767 working-aged respondents with Type 1 diabetes completed a Finnish cross-sectional survey named 'People with Type 1 Diabetes in Worklife'. Factor analysis was carried out, followed by logistic regressions to estimate the associations between self-management factors, psychosocial work factors and the likelihood of disclosure separately to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel. The models were adjusted for sociodemographic, diabetes-related and work-related variables.
A total of 52% of the respondents had disclosed their diabetes to their colleagues, 45% to occupational health personnel and 28% to their line manager. Receiving social support and having good psychosocial work ability were significantly associated with disclosure to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel. Relations at work were associated with disclosure to colleagues and the line manager. Furthermore, opportunity to self-manage diabetes at work was associated with disclosure to colleagues.
Line managers and colleagues have a remarkable role to play in providing workplace support to workers with Type 1 diabetes. Disclosure of Type 1 diabetes should be encouraged as line managers can provide workers with the right support, implement work adaptations and facilitate job retention. As only half of respondents disclosed their Type 1 diabetes at work, further research is required into the reasons for and consequences of not disclosing a diagnosis.
PubMed ID
27086666 View in PubMed
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Sense of mastery as mediator buffering psychological distress among people with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290001
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Jul; 30(5):839-44
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Karin Elisabeth Bennetter
Jocelyne Clench-Aas
Ruth Kjærsti Raanaas
Author Affiliation
Department of Landscape Architecture and Spatial Planning, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Jul; 30(5):839-44
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Combined Modality Therapy - adverse effects - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - psychology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Self Concept
Self Report
Self-Management - psychology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the association between diabetes with or without other comorbid somatic diseases and depression and anxiety, and to explore the mediating role of sense of mastery and social support.
Data were obtained from a cross-sectional health survey conducted in Norway (n=6827). People with diabetes alone or with simultaneous comorbid somatic diseases were compared to a group with no known somatic diseases.
Among people with diabetes alone, 16.3% reported having depression and anxiety. Having diabetes was associated with 3 times greater odds for anxiety compared to the control group, and 2 times greater odds for depression. Among individuals with diabetes and comorbid somatic diseases, 17.4% reported depression and 11.6% reported symptoms of anxiety. The odds for both were approximately 2 times greater than in the control group. Sense of mastery, but not social support, protected against depression in both groups and against anxiety in the diabetes with comorbidity group.
Comorbidity between diabetes and other somatic diseases seems to be related to depression to a larger degree, whereas having diabetes alone relates more to anxiety. This can possibly be explained by the overall burden in the comorbidity group and the related absence of sense of mastery.
PubMed ID
27085604 View in PubMed
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Sources of heterogeneity in developmental outcomes of children with past and current experiences of institutionalization in Russia: A four-group comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290002
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2017; 87(3):242-255
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Natalia Rakhlin
Sascha Hein
Niamh Doyle
Lesley Hart
Roman Koposov
Donna Macomber
Vladislav Ruchkin
Anastasia Strelina
Mei Tan
Elena L Grigorenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Wayne State University.
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2017; 87(3):242-255
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adoption - psychology
Age Factors
Child
Child Development
Child, Institutionalized - psychology
Child, Orphaned - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cognition
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Institutionalization
Language Development
Learning
Male
Risk factors
Russia
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The present study sought to compare 4 groups of age- and gender-matched children-(a) those reared in institutions for children without parental care in Russia; (b) those raised by their biological parents in Russia; (c) those adopted to the United States from Russian institutions; and (d) those born in the United States and raised by their biological parents-on indicators of cognition, language, and early learning. In addition, we aimed to compare the effects of the length of time spent in an institution, the age of initial placement in an institution, the age at adoption, and pre-institutional risk factors (i.e., prenatal substance exposure and prematurity and low birth weight) on the above-mentioned outcomes in the 2 groups of children with institutionalization experiences. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating negative consequences of institutionalization and substantial ameliorating effects of adoption. They also underscore the complexity of the effects of institutionalization and adoption, showing that they are intertwined with the effects of pre-institutional risk factors. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
27078048 View in PubMed
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Improving efficiency or impairing access? Health care consolidation and quality of care: Evidence from emergency hospital closures in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290003
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Jul; 48:44-60
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Daniel Avdic
Author Affiliation
CINCH, IFAU and University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany. Electronic address: daniel.avdic@uni-due.de.
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Jul; 48:44-60
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care
Geography
Health Facility Closure
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Quality of Health Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent health care consolidation trends raise the important policy question whether improved emergency medical services and enhanced productivity can offset adverse quality effects from decreased access. This paper empirically analyzes how geographical distance from an emergency hospital affects the probability of surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), accounting for health-based spatial sorting and data limitations on out-of-hospital mortality. Exploiting policy-induced variation in hospital distance derived from emergency hospital closures and detailed Swedish mortality data over two decades, results show a drastically decreasing probability of surviving an AMI as residential distance from a hospital increases one year after a closure occurred. The effect disappears in subsequent years, however, suggesting that involved agents quickly adapted to the new environment.
PubMed ID
27060525 View in PubMed
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Teenage girls with type 1 diabetes have poorer metabolic control than boys and face more complications in early adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290004
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Jul; 30(5):917-22
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Ulf Samuelsson
Johan Anderzén
Soffia Gudbjörnsdottir
Isabelle Steineck
Karin Åkesson
Lena Hanberger
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Jul; 30(5):917-22
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - drug therapy
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare metabolic control between males and females with type 1 diabetes during adolescence and as young adults, and relate it to microvascular complications.
Data concerning 4000 adolescents with type 1 diabetes registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, and above the age of 18years in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry was used.
When dividing HbA1c values in three groups; 9.3% (78mmol/mol), there was a higher proportion of females in the highest group during adolescence. In the group with the highest HbA1c values during adolescence and as adults, 51.7% were females, expected value 46.2%; in the group with low HbA1c values in both registries, 34.2% were females, p
PubMed ID
27052153 View in PubMed
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Increased mortality in a Danish cohort of young people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus followed for 24 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290005
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 03; 34(3):380-386
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
K Sandahl
L B Nielsen
J Svensson
J Johannesen
F Pociot
H B Mortensen
P Hougaard
R Broe
M L Rasmussen
J Grauslund
T Peto
B S Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 03; 34(3):380-386
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications - mortality - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Mortality
Prospective Studies
Registries
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the mortality rate in a Danish cohort of children and adolescents diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes mellitus compared with the general population.
In 1987 and 1989 we included 884 children and 1020 adolescents aged 20 years and under, corresponding to 75% of all Danish children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, in two nationwide studies in Denmark. Those who had participated in both investigations (n = 720) were followed until 1 January 2014, using the Danish Civil Registration System on death certificates and emigration. We derived the expected number of deaths in the cohort, using population data values from Statistics Denmark to calculate the standardized mortality ratio. Survival analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model.
During the 24 years of follow-up, 49 (6.8%) patients died, resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 4.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5, 6.2) compared with the age-standardized general population. A 1% increase in baseline HbA1c (1989), available in 718 of 720 patients, was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 1.6; P
PubMed ID
27027777 View in PubMed
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Causes of death in childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes: long-term follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290006
Source
Diabet Med. 2017 01; 34(1):56-63
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017

How can web-based training facilitate a more carer friendly practice in community-based health and social care services in Norway? Staff experiences and implementation challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290007
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2017 Mar; 25(2):559-568
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Helene Hanssen
Anne Norheim
Elizabeth Hanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2017 Mar; 25(2):559-568
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Caregivers
Community Health Services
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Inservice training
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Leadership
Male
Norway
Social Work
Abstract
It is a central feature of current Norwegian health and social care policy to see informal carers as active partners. However, research has revealed that carers often experience a lack of recognition by professionals. In 2010, the Norwegian Directorate of Health initiated a web-based competence-building programme (CBP) for health and social care practitioners aimed at facilitating collaboration with carers. The programme comprised case presentations, e-lectures, exercises and topics for discussion, and was introduced in 2012. It was flexible and free of charge. This article is based on a study (2012-2013) that followed the piloting of this CBP in four settings. The study aimed to explore factors that influenced the implementation of the programme and whether or not using it affected health and social care practitioners' attitudes and perceived capacity for collaboration with carers. The study employed a mixed-methods design. A questionnaire was distributed to all staff before and 5 months after the CBP was introduced, followed by focus group interviews with a sample of staff members and individual interviews with the leadership in the involved settings and those who introduced the programme. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, which subsequently formed the basis for the focus group interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by means of content analysis. The programme's introduction was similar across all research settings. Nevertheless, whether or not it was adopted depended to a large extent on leadership commitment and engagement. In settings where the programme's use was monitored, supported by management and formed part of on-the-job training, there seemed to be a positive impact on staff attitudes concerning collaboration with carers. Participant staff reported that their awareness of, motivation for and confidence in collaboration with carers were all strengthened. In contrast, the programme was of minimal benefit in settings with low leadership engagement.
PubMed ID
26970403 View in PubMed
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Hand pains in women and men in early rheumatoid arthritis, a one year follow-up after diagnosis. The Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290008
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 02; 39(3):291-300
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2017
Author
Ingrid Thyberg
Örjan Dahlström
Mathilda Björk
Birgitta Stenström
Jo Adams
Author Affiliation
a Department of Rheumatology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 02; 39(3):291-300
Date
02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Arthralgia - drug therapy - physiopathology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - physiopathology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Strength
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Sweden
Abstract
Purpose This research analysed general pain intensity, hand pain at rest and hand pain during activity in women and men in early rheumatoid arhtritis (RA). Method Out of the 454 patients that were recruited into the Swedish early RA project "TIRA" the 373 patients (67% women) that remained at 12 months follow-up are reported here. Disease activity 28 joint score (DAS-28), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire?=?HAQ) and pain (VAS) were recorded at inclusion and after 3 (M3), 6 (M6) and 12 (M12) months. General pain, hand pain during rest, hand pain during test of grip force as assessed by Grippit™, prescribed disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMARDs) and hand dominance were recorded. Results DAS-28 and HAQ scores were high at inclusion and improved thereafter in both women and men. There were no significant differences between sexes at inclusion but women had higher DAS-28 and HAQ at all follow-ups. Women were more often prescribed DMARDs than were men. In both women and men all pain types were significantly lower at follow-up compared to at inclusion and women reported higher pain than men at follow-ups. The pain types differed significantly from each other at inclusion into TIRA, general pain was highest and hand pain during rest was lowest. There were no significant differences in hand pain related to hand dominance or between right and left hands. Conclusions Disease activity, disability and pain were high at inclusion and reduced over the first year. Despite more DMARDs prescribed in women than in men, women were more affected than were men. General pain was highest and not surprisingly hand pain during active grip testing was higher than hand pain during rest that was lowest in both sexes. Although our cohort was well controlled, it was evident that hand pain remains a problem. This has implications for rehabilitation and suggests potential ongoing activity limitations that should continue to receive attention from a multi-professional team. Implications for Rehabilitation General pain and hand pain remain a problem in RA despite today's early intervention and effective disease control with new era biologics. The extent of hand pain evidenced in our work gives a more detailed and comprehensive account of pain status. Higher hand pain during active grip testing than that during rest indicates a potential relationship to ongoing activity limitation. Hand pain assessment can help guiding multi-professional interventions directed to reduce hand pain and thereby probably reduce activity limitations.
PubMed ID
26965161 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi in Ixodes persulcatus in Irkutsk City and its neighboring territories, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290009
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2016 Mar; 7(2):394-7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Maxim A Khasnatinov
Galina A Danchinova
Ai Takano
Hiroki Kawabata
Norio Ohashi
Toshiyuki Masuzawa
Author Affiliation
Federal State Public Science Institution, Scientific Centre of Family Health and Human Reproduction Problems, Irkutsk, Russia.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2016 Mar; 7(2):394-7
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Borrelia - genetics - isolation & purification
Flagellin - genetics
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Adult Ixodes persulcatus were collected in highly populated districts in Irkutsk city, Russia, and in popular recreational and professional areas in its neighboring territories. Borrelia miyamotoi infection in I. persulcatus was examined using multiplex Taqman-PCR targeting 16S rDNA, and nested PCR and sequencing analyses targeting flaB and 16S rDNA. B. miyamotoi and Lyme disease Borrelia species were detected in 13 (infection rate, 2.9%) and 77 (17.3%) out of 445 I. persulcatus ticks, respectively, collected from 4 sites around the Baikal Lake. The 16S rDNA and flaB sequences of these amplicons were closely related to those of B. miyamotoi detected and/or isolated from I. persulcatus in Japan and Far Eastern Russia, and clustered separately from those of Europe and North America. These results indicate that additional surveillance for B. miyamotoi infection is needed in order to determine how it affects human health in Irkutsk City and its neighboring territories.
PubMed ID
26750571 View in PubMed
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Sanitary-Epidemiological Status of Siberian Population (Medico-Demographical and Epidemiological Characteristics).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290010
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2016; 71(6):472-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Author
S I Kolesnikov
E D Savilov
M F Savchenkov
Ya A Leshchenko
I V Malov
E V Anganova
V A Astaf'ev
S N Shugaeva
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2016; 71(6):472-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Demography
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Public Health - methods - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Review on the problem of sanitary-epidemiological welfare of the population in the Siberian Federal District (SFD) was conducted based on literature data and authors own research in the period of 2002-2014. Authors provided broad information on the health and demographic and epidemiological characteristics of SFD population. SFD in comparison with other regions of the Russian Federation overcomes one of the most adverse situations including mortality rates from external causes. SFD population’s infectious and somatic morbidity rates were analyzed. Analysis demonstrated that the situation relating to priority epidemiologically and socially important infections (HIV-infection, parenteral viral hepatitis, tuberculosis etc.) on the territory of the SFD remains tense. Authors provided information on the increase in the level of the actual for Siberian regions natural-foci tick-borne infections. Detailed analysis for the environment anthropogenic pollution impact for the epidemic, infectious and vaccine induced processes. Authors suggest that anthropogenic (biological) environmental pollution is one of the most important factors influencing the epidemiological welfare of the Siberian population. A new strategic direction in epidemiological research associated with the problem of comorbid diseases is planned.
PubMed ID
29298018 View in PubMed
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Pediatric Health Quality Assessment in Different Regions of Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290011
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2016; 71(3):214-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
E N Baybarina
A A Baranov
L S Namazova-Baranova
S G Piskunova
E A Besedina
A N Sadovshikova
O R Yuldashev
S A Mukhortova
I A Artemova
V V Chernikov
A V Kharkin
E G Chistyakova
E L Vologdina
T N Kaputskaya
R F Kiripova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2016; 71(3):214-23
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Pediatric - standards
Humans
Needs Assessment
Pediatrics - organization & administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Russia
Abstract
The quality of pediatric healthcare is a cornerstone for good maternal and infant health.
To evaluate the quality of healthcare in secondary and tertiary regional pediatric hospitals in the Russian Federation.
Healthcare quality assessment was performed in 21 pediatric hospitals (tertiary, n=5; secondary, n=16) of four regions. The WHO recommendations were used.
In all regions, similar traits of inpatient pediatric healthcare determining a poor quality were observed. These included low preparedness for emergent care at admission departments; a high rate of unjustified hospitalization due to lack of clear indications for inpatient care; a widespread polypharmacy and unnecessary painful procedures and treatment; inadequate unjustified antimicrobial and parenteral therapy.
The revealed identity of problems in different regions of the country allows to consider a common strategy to overcome them, which, obviously, should primarily involve education of medical personnel, restructuring of hospital beds to increase day care beds, increasing the clinical expert work in hospitals.
PubMed ID
29297628 View in PubMed
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