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Periodontal condition in relation to the adherence to nutrient recommendations in daily smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303042
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2018 06; 45(6):636-649
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Leena M Jauhiainen
Anna L Suominen
Satu Männistö
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka V Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2018 06; 45(6):636-649
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet, Healthy
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - diet therapy
Smokers
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine whether a healthy diet based on nutrient recommendations is associated with periodontal condition in smokers.
Daily smokers from the cross-sectional Health 2000 Survey (BRIF 8901) in Finland were analysed in two age groups (30-49 and 50-79 years, n = 704 and 267) and according to the level of oral hygiene. Periodontal condition was measured as the number of sextants with gingival bleeding and teeth with =4 mm deepened periodontal pockets. Information on nutrition was collected by a validated food frequency questionnaire and measured using the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) and the Recommended Finnish Diet Score (RFDS).
In the total study population, no association between the scores and periodontal condition was observed. Among 30- to 49-year-old participants with good oral hygiene, diet scores associated inversely with the number of teeth with deepened periodontal pockets (p = .078 (BSDS) and p = .027 (RFDS)).
In a representative sample of Finnish adults who smoke, a healthy diet was not associated with periodontal condition. Among a younger age group with good oral hygiene, a healthy diet associated with better periodontal condition. Age and oral hygiene appeared to modify the association between diet and periodontal condition.
PubMed ID
29418017 View in PubMed
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Effect of beta-blocker therapy on early mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302995
Source
Br J Surg. 2019 03; 106(4):477-483
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
03-2019
Author
R Ahl
P Matthiessen
X Fang
Y Cao
G Sjolin
R Lindgren
O Ljungqvist
S Mohseni
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Surg. 2019 03; 106(4):477-483
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colectomy - methods - mortality
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality - prevention & control
Preoperative Care
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Rate
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Emergency colorectal cancer surgery is associated with significant mortality. Induced adrenergic hyperactivity is thought to be an important contributor. Downregulating the effects of circulating catecholamines may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes. This study assessed whether regular preoperative beta-blockade reduced mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery.
This cohort study used the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to recruit all adult patients requiring emergency colonic cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Patients were subdivided into those receiving regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery and those who were not (control). Demographics and clinical outcomes were compared. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated using Poisson regression analysis.
A total of 3187 patients were included, of whom 685 (21·5 per cent) used regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery. The overall 30-day mortality rate was significantly reduced in the beta-blocker group compared with controls: 3·1 (95 per cent c.i. 1·9 to 4·7) versus 8·6 (7·6 to 9·8) per cent respectively (P?
PubMed ID
30259967 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular responses to cold and submaximal exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303007
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2018 10 01; 315(4):R768-R776
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Rasmus I P Valtonen
Antti Kiviniemi
Heidi E Hintsala
Niilo R I Ryti
Tuomas Kenttä
Heikki V Huikuri
Juha Perkiömäki
Craig Crandall
Wouter van Marken Lichtenbelt
Markku Alén
Hannu Rintamäki
Matti Mäntysaari
Arto Hautala
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Tiina M Ikäheimo
Author Affiliation
Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research, University of Oulu , Finland.
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2018 10 01; 315(4):R768-R776
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Rehabilitation - adverse effects - methods
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Cross-Over Studies
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Exercise Tolerance
Finland
Health status
Hemodynamics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Regular year-round exercise is recommended for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the combined effects of cold and moderate sustained exercise, both known to increase cardiac workload, on cardiovascular responses are not known. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac workload is increased, and evidence of ischemia would be observed during exercise in the cold in patients with CAD. Sixteen men (59.3?±?7.0 yr, means?±?SD) with stable CAD each underwent 4, 30 min exposures in a randomized order: seated rest and moderate-intensity exercise [walking, 60%-70% of max heart rate (HR)] performed at +22°C and -15°C. Systolic brachial blood pressure (SBP), HR, electrocardiogram (ECG), and skin temperatures were recorded throughout the intervention. Rate pressure product (RPP) and ECG parameters were obtained. The combined effects of cold and submaximal exercise were additive for SBP and RPP and synergistic for HR when compared with rest in a neutral environment. RPP (mmHg·beats/min) was 17% higher during exercise in the cold (18,080?± 3540) compared with neutral (15,490?±?2,940) conditions ( P = 0.001). Only a few ST depressions were detected during exercise but without an effect of ambient temperature. The corrected QT interval increased while exercising in the cold compared with neutral temperature ( P = 0.023). Recovery of postexercise blood pressure was similar regardless of temperature. Whole body exposure to cold during submaximal exercise results in higher cardiac workload compared with a neutral environment. Despite the higher RPP, no signs of myocardial ischemia or abnormal ECG responses were observed. The results of this study are useful for planning year-round exercise-based rehabilitation programs for stable CAD patients.
PubMed ID
29975565 View in PubMed
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More cost-effective management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in primary care after direct triaging to physiotherapists for initial assessment compared to initial general practitioner assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302966
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 May 01; 20(1):186
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-01-2019
Author
Lena Bornhöft
Jörgen Thorn
Mikael Svensson
Lena Nordeman
Robert Eggertsen
Maria E H Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lena.bornhoft@vgregion.se.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 May 01; 20(1):186
Date
May-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Critical Pathways - economics - organization & administration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
General Practitioners - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Nurses - economics - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapists - economics - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Triage - economics - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
A model for triaging patients in primary care to provide immediate contact with the most appropriate profession to treat the condition in question has been developed and implemented in parts of Sweden. Direct triaging of patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) to physiotherapists at primary healthcare centres has been proposed as an alternative to initial assessment by general practitioners (GPs) and has been shown to have many positive effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness from the societal perspective of this new care-pathway through primary care regarding triaging patients with MSD to initial assessment by physiotherapists compared to standard practice with initial GP assessment.
Nurse-assessed patients with MSD (N =?55) were randomised to initial assessment and treatment with either physiotherapists or GPs and were followed for 1?year regarding health-related quality of life, utilization of healthcare resources and absence from work for MSD. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were calculated based on EQ5D measured at 5 time-points. Costs for healthcare resources and production loss were compiled. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERS) were calculated. Multiple imputation was used to compensate for missing values and bootstrapping to handle uncertainty. A cost-effectiveness plane and a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve were construed to describe the results.
The group who were allocated to initial assessment by physiotherapists had slightly larger gains in QALYs at lower total costs. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of 20,000 €, the likelihood that the intervention was cost-effective from a societal perspective including production loss due to MSD was 85% increasing to 93% at higher thresholds. When only healthcare costs were considered, triaging to physiotherapists was still less costly in relation to health improvements than standard praxis.
From the societal perspective, this small study indicated that triaging directly to physiotherapists in primary care has a high likelihood of being cost-effective. However, further larger randomised trials will be necessary to corroborate these findings.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02218749 . Registered August 18, 2014.
PubMed ID
31043169 View in PubMed
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Long-term Survival and Cardiovascular Morbidity after Elective Open Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with and without Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Propensity-Adjusted Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302967
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2019 Aug; 59:110-118
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Moncef Zarrouk
Stefan Franzén
Stefan Acosta
Peter Nilsson
Mervete Miftaraj
Björn Eliasson
Ann-Marie Svensson
Anders Gottsäter
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Diseases, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2019 Aug; 59:110-118
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - mortality - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Elective Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Epidemiological data indicate decreased risk for development and growth of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), but DM also goes with increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the effects of DM on mortality and CV morbidity after elective open AAA repair.
This is a nationwide observational cohort study of patients registered in the Swedish Vascular Registry and the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Comparison of mortality and CV morbidity after elective open AAA repair in 397 patients with and 1709 without DM with propensity score-adjusted analysis, during median 4.51 years of follow-up for patients with DM and 4.59 years for those without.
In adjusted analysis, diabetic patients showed higher rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (relative risk [RR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-2.36; P = 0.03) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs, RR 1.28, CI 1.04-1.58; P = 0.02) during follow-up, whereas there were no differences in total (RR 0.98, CI 0.75-1.29; P = 0.91) or CV (RR 0.30, CI 0.07-1.26; P = 0.10) mortality or stroke (RR 1.06, CI 0.67-1.67; P = 0.80). Among diabetic patients, higher HbA1c was related to a higher risk for AMI during follow-up (RR 1.04, CI 1.01-1.08; P = 0.02).
Patients with DM had higher rates of AMI and MACE after elective open AAA repair than those without DM, whereas neither total nor CV mortality differed between groups. Putative beneficial effects of DM on the aortic wall might not be relevant after open surgery including thrombus removal and aneurysmorrhaphy.
PubMed ID
31029685 View in PubMed
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Race/ethnicity and racial group composition moderate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention for substance use disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302896
Source
Addict Behav. 2018 06; 81:96-103
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
06-2018
Author
Brenna L Greenfield
Corey Roos
Kylee J Hagler
Elena Stein
Sarah Bowen
Katie A Witkiewitz
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus, Duluth, MN, United States. Electronic address: green970@d.umn.edu.
Source
Addict Behav. 2018 06; 81:96-103
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
African Americans
Alaska Natives
Asian Americans
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - methods
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Mindfulness - methods
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Secondary Prevention
Substance-Related Disorders - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Mindfulness-based relapse prevention has shown promise as a treatment for substance use disorder but its efficacy according to racial/ethnic minority status and group composition is unknown.
This is a secondary analysis of existing data (Bowen et al., 2014) testing individual race/ethnicity and racial/ethnic group composition as moderators of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP). Participants (N?=?191; 29% female; 47% racial/ethnic minority; mean age?=?39) with substance use disorder were randomized to MBRP or relapse prevention (RP). Outcomes were heavy drinking days (HDD) and drug use days (DUD) 12?months after treatment completion. Negative binominal regression models were conducted.
Analyses accounted for drug of choice. Individual race/ethnicity was a significant moderator of substance use outcomes. White participants had lower HDD in MBRP than RP (IRR?=?0, 95% CI: 0,0), whereas for minority participants, there was no treatment difference in HDD. Conversely, minorities had lower DUD in MBRP than RP (IRR?=?0.03, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.10), whereas for whites there was no treatment difference in DUD. Group racial/ethnic composition was a significant moderator. Participants in groups with more than half whites had lower HDD in MBRP than RP (IRR?=?0.01, 95% CI: 0, 0.09), whereas for participants in groups with more than half minorities there was no treatment difference in HDD. Exploratory analyses suggested MBRP resulted in better outcomes than RP when individual race/ethnic status was reflected in the group race/ethnicity (i.e., whites in groups with more than half whites or minorities in groups with more than half minorities).
Among whites, MBRP appears to be more effective than RP in preventing heavy drinking relapse. However, among racial/ethnic minorities, MBRP appears to more effective than RP in preventing drug use relapse. This suggests that the interaction between individual race/ethnicity and group composition may influence primary outcomes.
PubMed ID
29454179 View in PubMed
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Two-year follow-up of a postpartum weight loss intervention: Results from a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302909
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2018 04; 14(2):e12539
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Ena Huseinovic
Fredrik Bertz
Hilde Kristin Brekke
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2018 04; 14(2):e12539
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Overweight - diet therapy
Postpartum Period - physiology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Reduction Programs - methods
Abstract
We recently reported that a 12-week diet intervention among postpartum women produced a weight loss of 12% after 1 year, compared to 5% in controls. Here, we present 2-year results after 1 year of unsupervised follow-up. In total, 110 women with a self-reported body mass index of =27 kg/m2 at 6-15-week postpartum were randomized to diet group (D-group) or control group (C-group). D-group received a 12-week diet intervention by a dietitian followed by monthly e-mails up to the 1-year follow-up. C-group received a brochure on healthy eating. No contact was provided from 1 to 2 years to either group. Eighty-nine women (81%) completed the 2-year follow-up. Median (1st; 3rd quartile) weight change from 0 to 2 years was -6.9 (-11.0; -2.2) kg in D-group and -4.3 (-8.7; -0.2) kg in C-group. There was no group by time interaction at 2 years (p = .082); however, when women with a new pregnancy between 1 and 2 years were excluded, the interaction became significant (-8.2 vs. -4.6 kg, p = .038). From 1 to 2 years, women in D- and C-group gained 2.5 ± 5.0 kg and 1.1 ± 4.4 kg, respectively (p = .186). Women who gained weight from 1 to 2 years reported a decrease in self-weighing frequency compared to women who maintained or lost weight (p = .008). Both groups achieved clinically relevant 2-year weight loss, but the significant between-group-difference observed at 1 year was not maintained at 2 years in the main analysis. However, when women with a new pregnancy between 1 and 2 years were excluded, a significant weight loss effect was observed also at 2 years.
PubMed ID
28984033 View in PubMed
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Tumour-stroma ratio and prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302889
Source
Br J Cancer. 2018 08; 119(4):435-439
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Niko Kemi
Maarit Eskuri
Anni Herva
Joni Leppänen
Heikki Huhta
Olli Helminen
Juha Saarnio
Tuomo J Karttunen
Joonas H Kauppila
Author Affiliation
Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, Medical Research Center, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. niko.kemi@oulu.fi.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2018 08; 119(4):435-439
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - pathology - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Stromal Cells - cytology
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Microenvironment
Abstract
Tumour microenvironment, including tumour-stroma ratio (TSR), might help identifying high-risk cancer patients. However, the significance of TSR in gastric cancer is unclear, especially in the intestinal and diffuse subtypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the tumour-stroma ratio in gastric adenocarcinoma, and its intestinal and diffuse histological subtypes, in relation to prognosis.
Five hundred and eighty-three gastric adenocarcinoma patients who underwent surgery in Oulu University hospital during years 1983-2016 were included in this retrospective cohort study. TSR was analysed from the slides that were originally used for diagnostic purposes. Patients were divided into stroma-poor (=50% stroma) and stroma-rich (>50% stroma) groups and TSR was analysed in relation to 5-year mortality and overall mortality.
Patients with stroma-rich tumours had worse 5-year prognosis (HR 1.80, 95% CI 1.41-2.28) compared to stroma-poor tumours. Stratified analysis showed that stroma-rich tumours had worse 5-year prognosis in both intestinal (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.24-2.27) and diffuse histological types (HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.35-3.23) compared to stroma-poor tumours, respectively.
High proportion of stroma is an independent prognostic factor in both intestinal and diffuse histological subtypes of gastric adenocarcinoma.
PubMed ID
30057407 View in PubMed
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The early chain of care in bacteraemia patients: Early suspicion, treatment and survival in prehospital emergency care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302786
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2018 12; 36(12):2211-2218
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
12-2018
Author
Henrik Andersson
Christer Axelsson
Anna Larsson
Anders Bremer
Martin Gellerstedt
Angela Bång
Johan Herlitz
Lars Ljungström
Author Affiliation
University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Researc Borås, Sweden; University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden. Electronic address: henrik.andersson@hb.se.
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2018 12; 36(12):2211-2218
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Early Diagnosis
Emergency medical services
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Sepsis - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bacteraemia is a first stage for patients risking conditions such as septic shock. The primary aim of this study is to describe factors in the early chain of care in bacteraemia, factors associated with increased chance of survival during the subsequent 28days after admission to hospital. Furthermore, the long-term outcome was assessed.
This study has a quantitative design based on data from Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital records.
In all, 961 patients were included in the study. Of these patients, 13.5% died during the first 28days. The EMS was more frequently used by non-survivors. Among patients who used the EMS, the suspicion of sepsis already on scene was more frequent in survivors. Similarly, EMS personnel noted the ESS code "fever, infection" more frequently for survivors upon arriving on scene. The delay time from call to the EMS and admission to hospital until start of antibiotics was similar in survivors and non-survivors. The five-year mortality rate was 50.8%. Five-year mortality was 62.6% among those who used the EMS and 29.5% among those who did not (p
PubMed ID
29653787 View in PubMed
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Structured physiotherapy including a work place intervention for patients with neck and/or back pain in primary care: an economic evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302772
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2019 Mar; 20(2):317-327
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Sanjib Saha
Birgitta Grahn
Ulf-G Gerdtham
Kjerstin Stigmar
Sara Holmberg
Johan Jarl
Author Affiliation
Health Economics Unit, Department of Clinical Science (Malmö), Lund University, Medicon Village, Scheelevägen 2, 22381, Lund, Sweden. sanjib.saha@med.lu.se.
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2019 Mar; 20(2):317-327
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - economics - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - economics - therapy
Patient Satisfaction - economics
Physical Therapy Modalities - economics
Primary Health Care
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Recovery of Function
Return to work
Sick Leave - economics
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Workplace
Abstract
A cluster-randomized controlled trial, WorkUp, was conducted for working-aged patients at risk of sick leave or on short-term sick leave due to acute/subacute neck and/or back pain in Sweden. The purpose of WorkUp was to facilitate participants to stay at work or in case of sick leave, return-to-work. The aim of this study was to study whether the WorkUp trial was cost-effective. Patients in the intervention and reference group received structured evidence-based physiotherapy, while patients in the intervention group also received a work place dialogue with the employer as an add-on. The participants, 352 in total, were recruited from 20 physiotherapeutic units in primary healthcare in southern Sweden. The economic evaluation was performed both from a healthcare and a societal perspective with a 12-month time frame with extensive univariate sensitivity analyses. Results were presented as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) with outcomes measured as quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) and proportion working for at least 4 weeks in a row without reported sick leave at 12-month follow-up. From the healthcare perspective, the ICER was €23,606 (2013 price year) per QALY gain. From the societal perspective the intervention was dominating, i.e.. less costly and more effective than reference care. Bootstrap analysis showed that the probability of the intervention to be cost-effective at €50,000 willingness-to-pay per QALY was 85% from the societal perspective. Structured evidence-based physiotherapeutic care together with workplace dialogue is a cost-effective alternative from both a societal and a healthcare perspective for acute/subacute neck and/or back pain patients.Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02609750.
PubMed ID
30171489 View in PubMed
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The highest mortality rates in childhood dilated cardiomyopathy occur during the first year after diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302663
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2018 Apr; 107(4):672-677
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Shalan Fadl
Håkan Wåhlander
Katja Fall
Yang Cao
Jan Sunnegårdh
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2018 Apr; 107(4):672-677
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the incidence, mortality and morbidity of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and noncompaction of the left ventricle (LVNC) in Swedish children.
We reviewed hospital records of all children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) up to the age of 18 in the healthcare region of western Sweden from 1991 to 2015.
In total, 69 cases (61% males) were identified. The combined incidence of DCM and LVNC was 0.77 (95% CI 0.59-0.96) per 100 000 person years. Children were divided into six groups, and their outcomes were analysed depending on their aetiology. Idiopathic DCM was reported in 43%, and familial dilated and left ventricular noncompaction aetiology was present in 32%. DCM due to various diseases occurred in 8%. DCM associated with neuromuscular diseases was present in 16%. The overall risk of death or receiving transplants in children with idiopathic and familial DCM was 30% over the study period, and 21% died in the first year after diagnosis.
The combined incidence of DCM and LVNC was similar to previous reports. Most children with idiopathic DCM presented during infancy, and mortality was highest during the first year after diagnosis.
PubMed ID
29224255 View in PubMed
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High-Sensitivity Troponins and Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302643
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 06 12; 71(23):2616-2624
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-12-2018
Author
Maria Odqvist
Per-Ola Andersson
Hans Tygesen
Kai M Eggers
Martin J Holzmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, South Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 06 12; 71(23):2616-2624
Date
06-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - blood - diagnostic imaging - mortality
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Troponin T - blood
Abstract
It remains unknown how the introduction of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) has affected the incidence, prognosis, and use of coronary angiographies and revascularizations in patients with myocardial infarction (MI).
The aim of this study was to investigate how the incidence of MI and prognosis after a first MI was affected by the introduction of hs-cTnT.
In a cohort study, the authors included all patients with a first MI from the Swedish National Patient Registry from 2009 to 2013. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of all-cause mortality, reinfarction, coronary angiographies, and revascularizations in patients with MI diagnosed using hs-cTnT compared with those diagnosed using conventional troponins (cTn).
During the study period, 47,133 MIs were diagnosed using cTn and 40,746 using hs-cTnT. The rate of MI increased by 5% (95% CI: 0% to 10%) after the introduction of hs-cTnT. During 3.9 ± 2.8 years of follow-up, there were 33,492 deaths, with no difference in the risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.97 to 1.02). There were, in total, 15,766 reinfarctions during 3.1 ± 2.3 years of follow-up, with the risk of reinfarction reduced by 11% in patients diagnosed using hs-cTnT (adjusted HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.86 to 0.91). The use of coronary angiographies (adjusted HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.14 to 1.18) and revascularizations (adjusted HR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.15) increased in the hs-cTnT group.
In a nationwide cohort study including 87,879 patients with a first MI, the introduction of hs-cTnT was associated with an increased incidence of MI, although with no impact on survival. We also found a reduced risk of reinfarction alongside increased use of coronary angiographies and revascularizations.
Notes
CommentIn: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Jun 12;71(23):2625-2627 PMID 29880122
CommentIn: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Oct 9;72(15):1877-1878 PMID 30286934
CommentIn: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Oct 9;72(15):1878 PMID 30286936
PubMed ID
29880121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Feasibility of a checklist in treating hypertension in primary care - base line results from a cluster-randomised controlled trial (check and support).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302619
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2018 12 19; 18(1):240
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-19-2018
Author
Aapo Tahkola
Päivi Korhonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Teemu Niiranen
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. aapo.tahkola@jkl.fi.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2018 12 19; 18(1):240
Date
12-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Checklist - standards
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Primary Health Care - methods - standards
Quality Improvement
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Most patients with antihypertensive medication do not achieve their blood pressure (BP) target. The most important factor behind this failure is poor medication adherence. However, non-adherence to therapy does not concern only patients. Clinicians also tend to lack adherence to hypertension guidelines, overestimate BP control and be satisfied with inadequate BP control. The aim of this non-blinded, cluster-randomised, controlled study was to investigate if using a checklist would improve the quality of care in the initiation of new antihypertensive medication and help reduce non-adherence.
The study was conducted in eight primary care study centres in Central Finland, randomised to function as either intervention (n?=?4) or control sites (n?=?4). We included patients aged 30-75?years who were prescribed antihypertensive medication for the first time. Initiation of medication in the intervention group was carried out with a 9-item checklist, filled in together by the treating physician and the patient. Hypertension treatment in the control group was managed by the treating physician without a study-specific protocol.
In total, 119 patients were included in the study, of which 118 were included in the analysis (n?=?59 in the control group, n?=?59 in the intervention group). When initiating antihypertensive medication, an adequate BP target was set for 19% of the patients in the control group and for 68% in the intervention group. Shortly after the appointment, only 14% of the patients in the control group were able to remember the adequate BP target, compared with 32% in the intervention group. The use of the checklist was also related to more regular agreement on the next follow-up appointment (64% in the control group versus 95% in the intervention group). No adverse events or side effects were related to the intervention.
Even highly motivated new hypertensive patients in Finnish primary care have significant gaps in their informational and behavioural skills. The use of a checklist for initiation of antihypertensive medication was related to significant improvement in these skills. Based on our findings, the use of a checklist might be a practical tool for addressing this problem.
NCT02377960 . Date of registration: February 26th, 2015.
PubMed ID
30567497 View in PubMed
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Androgen Deprivation Therapies and Changes in Comorbidity: A Comparison of Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonists and Antiandrogen Monotherapy as Primary Therapy in Men with High-risk Prostate Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302621
Source
Eur Urol. 2019 04; 75(4):676-683
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2019
Author
Kerri Beckmann
Hans Garmo
Jan Adolfsson
Cecilia Bosco
Eva Johansson
David Robinson
Lars Holmberg
Par Stattin
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Author Affiliation
Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, King's College London, London, UK. Electronic address: Kerri.beckmann@kcl.ac.uk.
Source
Eur Urol. 2019 04; 75(4):676-683
Date
04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Androgen Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone - agonists
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Some studies suggest that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are associated with higher risk of adverse events than antiandrogens (AAs) monotherapy. However, it has been unclear whether this is due to indication bias.
To investigate rates of change in comorbidity for men on GnRH agonists versus AA monotherapy in a population-based register study.
Men with advanced nonmetastatic prostate cancer (PCa) who received primary AA (n=2078) or GnRH agonists (n=4878) and age- and area-matched PCa-free men were selected from Prostate Cancer Database Sweden 3.0. Increases in comorbidity were measured using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), from 5yr before through to 5yr after starting androgen deprivation therapy (ADT).
Multivariable linear regression was used to determine differences in excess rate of CCI change before and after ADT initiation. Risk of any incremental change in CCI following ADT was assessed using multivariable Cox regression analyses.
Men on GnRH agonists experienced a greater difference in excess rate of CCI change after starting ADT than men on AA monotherapy (5.6% per yr, p
PubMed ID
30497883 View in PubMed
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Quality of life is not improved after mitral valve surgery combined with epicardial left atrial cryoablation as compared with mitral valve surgery alone: a substudy of the double blind randomized SWEDish Multicentre Atrial Fibrillation study (SWEDMAF).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302211
Source
Europace. 2018 11 01; 20(FI_3):f343-f350
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
11-01-2018
Author
Louise Bagge
Johan Probst
Steen M Jensen
Per Blomström
Stefan Thelin
Anders Holmgren
Carina Blomström-Lundqvist
Author Affiliation
Departments of Cardiology and Medical Science, Uppsala University, SE-751?85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Europace. 2018 11 01; 20(FI_3):f343-f350
Date
11-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Cryosurgery - adverse effects
Double-Blind Method
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve - physiopathology - surgery
Quality of Life
Recovery of Function
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Concomitant surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery (MVS) has almost become routine despite lack of convincing information about improved quality-of-life (QOL) and clinical benefit. Quality-of-life was therefore assessed after MVS with or without epicardial left atrial cryoablation.
Sixty-five patients with permanent AF randomized to MVS with or without left atrial cryoablation, in the double-blinded multicentre SWEDMAF trial, replied to the Short Form 36 QOL survey at 6 and 12?months follow-up. The QOL scores at 12?month follow-up did not differ significantly between patients undergoing MVS combined with cryoablation vs. those undergoing MVS alone regarding Physical Component Summary mean 42.8 (95% confidence interval 38.3-47.3) vs. mean 44.0 (40.1-47.7), P?=?0.700 or Mental Component Summary mean 53.1 (49.7-56.4) vs. mean 48.4 (44.6-52.2), P?=?0.075. All patients, irrespective of allocated procedure, reached the same QOL after surgery as an age-matched Swedish general population. The Physical Component Summary in patients with sinus rhythm did also not differ from those in AF at 12?months; mean 45.4 (42.0-48.7) vs. mean 40.5 (35.5-45.6), P?=?0.096) nor was there a difference in Mental Component Summary; mean 51.0 (48.0-54.1) vs. mean 49.6 (44.6-54.5), P?=?0.581).
Left atrial cryoablation added to MVS does not improve health-related QOL in patients with permanent AF, a finding that raises concerns regarding recommendations made for this combined procedure.
Notes
CommentIn: Europace. 2018 Nov 1;20(FI_3):f458 PMID 29240882
CommentIn: Europace. 2018 Nov 1;20(FI_3):f458-f459 PMID 29240895
PubMed ID
29016835 View in PubMed
Less detail

No Benefit of Ticagrelor Pretreatment Compared With Treatment During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302183
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2018 03; 11(3):e005528
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Sasha Koul
J Gustav Smith
Matthias Götberg
Elmir Omerovic
Joakim Alfredsson
Dimitrios Venetsanos
Jonas Persson
Jens Jensen
Bo Lagerqvist
Björn Redfors
Stefan James
David Erlinge
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Cardiology (S.K., J.G.S., M.G., D.E.) and Department of Clinical Sciences (S.K., J.G.S., M.G., D.E.), Skane University Hospital Lund, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden (E.O., B.R.); Department of Cardiology (J.A., D.V.) and Department of Medical and Health Sciences (J.A., D.V.), Linköping University, Sweden; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital (J.P.) and Department of Medicine, Capio Saint Göran Hospital (J.J.), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; and Uppsala Clinical Research Institute, Uppsala University, Sweden (B.L., S.J.). sashamkoul@gmail.com.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2018 03; 11(3):e005528
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Thrombosis - etiology
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - mortality
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Recurrence
Registries
Risk factors
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction - diagnostic imaging - mortality - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Ticagrelor - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The effects of ticagrelor pretreatment in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is debated. This study investigated the effects of ticagrelor pretreatment on clinical outcomes in this patient group.
Patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary PCI were included from October 2010 to October 2014 in Sweden. Screening was done using the SWEDEHEART register (Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies). A total of 7433 patients were included for analysis with 5438 patients receiving ticagrelor pretreatment and 1995 patients with ticagrelor given only in the catheterization laboratory. The primary end point of the study was 30-day event rates of a composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), and stent thrombosis. Secondary end points were mortality, MI, or stent thrombosis alone and major in-hospital bleeding. Crude event rates showed no difference in 30-day composite end point (6.2% versus 6.5%; P=0.69), mortality (4.5% versus 4.7%; P=0.86), MI (1.6% versus 1.7%; P=0.72), or stent thrombosis (0.5% versus 0.4%; P=0.80) with ticagrelor pretreatment. Three different statistical models were used to correct for baseline differences. No difference in the composite end point, mortality, MI, or stent thrombosis was seen between the 2 groups after statistical adjustment. No increase in in-hospital major bleeding rate was observed with ticagrelor pretreatment.
Ticagrelor pretreatment versus ticagrelor given in the catheterization laboratory in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary PCI did not improve the composite end point of all-cause mortality or MI or stent thrombosis or its individual components at 30 days.
Notes
CommentIn: Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2018 Mar;11(3):e006555 PMID 29870388
PubMed ID
29870381 View in PubMed
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Bioabsorbable polymer everolimus-eluting stents in patients with acute myocardial infarction: a report from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302185
Source
EuroIntervention. 2018 Aug 03; 14(5):e562-e569
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-03-2018
Author
Sergio Buccheri
Giovanna Sarno
Bo Lagerqvist
Göran Olivecrona
Kristina Hambraeus
Nils Witt
Daniel Lindholm
David Erlinge
Oskar Angerås
Stefan James
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology and Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
EuroIntervention. 2018 Aug 03; 14(5):e562-e569
Date
Aug-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorbable Implants
Coronary Angiography
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - surgery
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Polymers
Registries
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The clinical performance of the SYNERGY drug-eluting stent (DES) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) has not been investigated in detail. We sought to report on the outcomes after SYNERGY DES (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) implantation in patients with MI undergoing percutaneous revascularisation (PCI).
We included all consecutive patients with MI undergoing PCI with the SYNERGY DES and newer-generation DES (n-DES group) in Sweden. From March 2013 to September 2016, a total of 36,292 patients, of whom 39.7% presented with ST-elevation MI, were included. As compared to patients in the n-DES group (n=31,403), patients in the SYNERGY group (n=4,889) were older and presented more often with left main or three-vessel disease involvement, as well as with restenotic lesions (p
PubMed ID
29792402 View in PubMed
Less detail

A prospective 5-year follow-up after population-based systematic screening for atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302187
Source
Europace. 2018 11 01; 20(FI_3):f306-f311
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-01-2018
Author
Johan Engdahl
Anders Holmén
Mårten Rosenqvist
Ulf Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Mörbygårdsvägen 5, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Europace. 2018 11 01; 20(FI_3):f306-f311
Date
11-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Medication Adherence
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Thrombo-embolic stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) is significantly reduced with oral anticoagulant (OAC) treatment. Atrial fibrillation is often asymptomatic (silent) and therefore undiagnosed. The long-term course of silent AF as well as OAC treatment adherence after AF screening is not known. We aim at studying long-term adherence to OAC treatment, AF symptoms, and stroke incidence on population level after systematic AF screening.
All inhabitants in a Swedish municipality who were born in 1934 and 1935 (n?=?1335) were invited to participate in an AF screening trial between 2010 and 2012. Participants with a previously known or screening-detected AF were invited to a 5-year follow-up. Time trends of ischaemic stroke incidence were compared for population groups residing in the intervention municipality and in a surrounding control area where no AF screening trial was carried out. After the screening procedure, 103 of 121 participants (85%) with AF were treated with OAC. At the follow-up examination, 94 of 106 living patients (88%) were still on OAC treatment. Among the 23 long-term surviving patients who were diagnosed with paroxysmal AF during screening, 6 had developed permanent silent AF. The incidence of ischaemic stroke between ages 76-80?years declined significantly after the AF screening trial in the intervention area (P?=?0.003) but not in the control area.
Adherence to OAC treatment 5?years after AF screening was high. Silent AF has a natural course similar to symptomatic AF. The observed incidences of ischaemic stroke suggest a beneficial population-level effect of systematic AF screening.
Notes
CommentIn: Europace. 2018 Nov 1;20(FI_3):f278-f279 PMID 29860322
PubMed ID
29688312 View in PubMed
Less detail

Very long-term outcome of coronary covered stents: a report from the SCAAR registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302164
Source
EuroIntervention. 2019 Mar 20; 14(16):1660-1667
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Mar-20-2019
Author
Jan Harnek
Stefan K James
Bo Lagerqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease and Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
EuroIntervention. 2019 Mar 20; 14(16):1660-1667
Date
Mar-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Animals
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Restenosis
Horses
Humans
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Registries
Risk factors
Stents
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Covered stents are mostly used for coronary perforations with a high risk of early adverse events; however, their long-term outcome is unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the short- and long-term outcome of patients treated with covered stents compared to all other stented patients.
The Swedish national registries from 2005-2017 disclosed 265 patients who had received 366 covered stents. Their outcomes were compared to all other stented patients (197,948) who had received 320,784 stents. Compared to regular stents, covered stents showed significant differences (p
PubMed ID
30375337 View in PubMed
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436 records – page 1 of 22.