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Proton-pumping rhodopsins are abundantly expressed by microbial eukaryotes in a high-Arctic fjord.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300090
Source
Environ Microbiol. 2018 02; 20(2):890-902
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Anna Vader
Haywood D Laughinghouse
Colin Griffiths
Kjetill S Jakobsen
Tove M Gabrielsen
Author Affiliation
University Centre in Svalbard, Longyearbyen, Norway.
Source
Environ Microbiol. 2018 02; 20(2):890-902
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cryptophyta - genetics - metabolism
Dinoflagellida - genetics - metabolism
Estuaries
Haptophyta - genetics - metabolism
Ion Transport - genetics
Oceans and Seas
Photosynthesis - genetics
Phylogeny
Proton Pumps - genetics - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Rhodopsin - biosynthesis - genetics
Stramenopiles - genetics - metabolism
Svalbard
Transcriptome - genetics
Abstract
Proton-pumping rhodopsins provide an alternative pathway to photosynthesis by which solar energy can enter the marine food web. Rhodopsin genes are widely found in marine bacteria, also in the Arctic, and were recently reported from several eukaryotic lineages. So far, little is known about rhodopsin expression in Arctic eukaryotes. In this study, we used metatranscriptomics and 18S rDNA tag sequencing to examine the mid-summer function and composition of marine protists (size 0.45-10 µm) in the high-Arctic Billefjorden (Spitsbergen), especially focussing on the expression of microbial proton-pumping rhodopsins. Rhodopsin transcripts were highly abundant, at a level similar to that of genes involved in photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses placed the environmental rhodopsins within disparate eukaryotic lineages, including dinoflagellates, stramenopiles, haptophytes and cryptophytes. Sequence comparison indicated the presence of several functional types, including xanthorhodopsins and a eukaryotic clade of proteorhodopsin. Transcripts belonging to the proteorhodopsin clade were also abundant in published metatranscriptomes from other oceanic regions, suggesting a global distribution. The diversity and abundance of rhodopsins show that these light-driven proton pumps play an important role in Arctic microbial eukaryotes. Understanding this role is imperative to predicting the future of the Arctic marine ecosystem faced by a changing light climate due to diminishing sea-ice.
PubMed ID
29266690 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of PCDD/PCDFs, dioxin-like PCBs, and PBDEs in surface sediments from the Neva River and the Eastern Gulf of Finland (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300069
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7375-7389
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Larisa Metelkova
Zoya Zhakovskaya
Galina Kukhareva
Alexander Rybalko
Vladimir Nikiforov
Author Affiliation
Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences Saint-Petersburg Scientific-Research Centre for Ecological Safety, 18, Korpusnaya str, St. Petersburg, Russia, 197110. larissa.metelkova@list.ru.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7375-7389
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Benzofurans - analysis
Canada
Dibenzofurans, Polychlorinated - analysis
Dioxins - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
European Union
Finland
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Oceans and Seas
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxins - analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Russia
Seawater - chemistry
Abstract
A total of 26 samples of surface sediments collected in the Neva River (including the St. Petersburg city area) and in the Russian part of the Gulf of Finland were analyzed for 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), 12 dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs), and 10 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The concentrations of total PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in sediments ranged from
PubMed ID
29808409 View in PubMed
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[The Russian version of Coma Recovery Scale-revised - a standardized method for assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300070
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2018; 118(3. Vyp. 2):25-31
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
E G Mochalova
L A Legostaeva
A A Zimin
D G Yusupova
D V Sergeev
Yu V Ryabinkina
Y Bodien
N A Suponeva
M A Piradov
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Neurology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2018; 118(3. Vyp. 2):25-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Coma - classification - diagnosis
Consciousness
Consciousness Disorders - classification - diagnosis
Humans
Recovery of Function
Russia
Abstract
The authors officially present for the first time the Russian version of Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R). Today CRS-R is the only validated scale in Russian for assessment of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). The study showed high consistency for different researchers, high sensitivity in the evaluation of patients over time as well as high concurrent validity. This article contains the text of the scale and recommendations how to use CRS-R and interpret the data. Presented version of the CRS-R is recommended for use in DOC patients. Russian version of the CRS-R is a standardized, comprehensive and systematic approach to the examination and assessment of patients with chronic DOS. It ensures the standard approach to examination and assessment that warrants the accuracy and homogeneity of the obtained results.
??????? ?????????? ???????????? ???????????????? ?????? ?????????????? ????? ?????????????? ????? ???? (Coma Recovery Scale-Revised - CRS-R), ??????? ?? ??????????? ???? ???????? ???????????? ???????????????? ???????????? ?? ??????? ????? ??? ?????? ????????? ? ???????????? ??????????? ???????? (???). ??????????? ????????????? ?????????? ??????? ??????????????? ??? ?????? ??????????????, ??????? ???????????????? ??? ?????? ??????? ? ????????, ???????? ????????? ????????? ???????????? ????????, ? ????? ???????????? ???????????? ??????????. ????????? ????? ?????, ??????? ?? ????????????? ? ????????????? ?????????? ??????. ????????????? ?????? CRS-R ????????????? ? ?????????? ??? ?????? ? ?????????? c ???. ??? ???????????? ??????????????????? ??????????? ?????? ? ??????? ? ?????? ??????? ? ???, ??? ??????????? ???????? ? ???????????? ?????????? ???????????.
PubMed ID
29798977 View in PubMed
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Elucidation of contamination sources for poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) on Svalbard (Norwegian Arctic).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300071
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7356-7363
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Jøran Solnes Skaar
Erik Magnus Ræder
Jan Ludvig Lyche
Lutz Ahrens
Roland Kallenborn
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 2027, Kjeller, Norway.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7356-7363
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Firefighters
Fires
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Freezing
Fresh Water - chemistry
Geological Phenomena
Ice Cover
Lakes - chemistry
Mining
Norway
Rivers - chemistry
Seawater - chemistry
Snow - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Svalbard
Waste Disposal Facilities
Waste Water
Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
A combination of local (i.e. firefighting training facilities) and remote sources (i.e. long-range transport) is assumed to be responsible for the occurrence of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Svalbard (Norwegian Arctic). However, no systematic elucidation of local PFASs sources has been conducted yet. Therefore, a survey was performed aiming at identifying local PFAS pollution sources on the island of Spitsbergen (Svalbard, Norway). Soil, freshwater (lake, draining rivers), seawater, meltwater run-off, surface snow and coastal sediment samples were collected from Longyearbyen (Norwegian mining town), Ny-Ålesund (research facility) and the Lake Linnévatnet area (background site) during several campaigns (2014-2016) and analysed for 14 individual target PFASs. For background site (Linnévatnet area, sampling during April to June 2015), SPFAS levels ranged from 0.4 to 4 ng/L in surface lake water (n?=?20). PFAS in meltwater from the contributing glaciers showed similar concentrations (~?4 ng/L, n?=?2). The short-chain perfluorobutanoate (PFBA) was predominant in lake water (60-80% of the SPFASs), meltwater (20-30%) and run-off water (40%). Long-range transport is assumed to be the major PFAS source. In Longyearbyen, five water samples (i.e. 2 seawater, 3 run-off) were collected near the local firefighting training site (FFTS) in November 2014 and June 2015, respectively. The highest PFAS levels were found in FFTS meltwater run-off (118 ng/L). Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) was the most abundant compound in the FFTS meltwater run-off (53-58% PFASs). At the research station Ny-Ålesund, seawater (n?=?6), soil (n?=?9) and freshwater (n?=?10) were collected in June 2016. Low SPFAS concentrations were determined for seawater (5-6 ng/L), whereas high SPFAS concentrations were found in run-off water (113-119 ng/L) and soil (211-800 ng/g dry weight (dw)) collected close to the local FFTS. In addition, high SPFAS levels (127 ng/L) were also found in freshwater from lake Solvatnet close to former sewage treatment facility. Overall, at both FFTS-affected sites (soil, water), PFOS was the most abundant compound (60-69% of SPFASs). FFTS and landfill locations were identified as major PFAS sources for Svalbard settlements.
PubMed ID
29754295 View in PubMed
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Pinocchio testing in the forensic analysis of waiting lists: using public waiting list data from Finland and Spain for testing Newcomb-Benford's Law.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300072
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e022079
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-09-2018
Author
Jaime Pinilla
Beatriz G López-Valcárcel
Christian González-Martel
Salvador Peiro
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Métodos Cuantitativos en Economía y Gestión, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria - Campus de Tafira, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e022079
Date
05-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Finland
Humans
National Health Programs
Probability
Research Design
Spain
Statistics as Topic - methods
Universal Health Insurance
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Newcomb-Benford's Law (NBL) proposes a regular distribution for first digits, second digits and digit combinations applicable to many different naturally occurring sources of data. Testing deviations from NBL is used in many datasets as a screening tool for identifying data trustworthiness problems. This study aims to compare public available waiting lists (WL) data from Finland and Spain for testing NBL as an instrument to flag up potential manipulation in WLs.
Analysis of the frequency of Finnish and Spanish WLs first digits to determine if their distribution is similar to the pattern documented by NBL. Deviations from the expected first digit frequency were analysed using Pearson's ?2, mean absolute deviation and Kuiper tests.
Publicly available WL data from Finland and Spain, two countries with universal health insurance and National Health Systems but characterised by different levels of transparency and good governance standards.
Adjustment of the observed distribution of the numbers reported in Finnish and Spanish WL data to the expected distribution according to NBL.
WL data reported by the Finnish health system fits first digit NBL according to all statistical tests used (p=0.6519 in ?2 test). For Spanish data, this hypothesis was rejected in all tests (p
PubMed ID
29743333 View in PubMed
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Sickness absence as a predictor of disability retirement in different occupational classes: a register-based study of a working-age cohort in Finland in 2007-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300073
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e020491
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-09-2018
Author
Laura Salonen
Jenni Blomgren
Mikko Laaksonen
Mikko Niemelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Research, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e020491
Date
05-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of the study was to examine diagnosis-specific sickness absences of different lengths as predictors of disability retirement in different occupational classes.
Register-based prospective cohort study up to 8 years of follow-up.
A 70% random sample of the non-retired Finnish population aged 25-62 at the end of 2006 was included (n=1 727 644) and linked to data on sickness absences in 2005 and data on disability retirement in 2007-2014.
Cox proportional hazards regression was utilised to analyse the association of sickness absence with the risk of all-cause disability retirement during an 8-year follow-up.
The risk of disability retirement increased with increasing lengths of sickness absence in all occupational classes. A long sickness absence was a particularly strong predictor of disability retirement in upper non-manual employees as among those with over 180 sickness absence days the HR was 9.19 (95% CI 7.40 to 11.40), but in manual employees the HR was 3.51 (95% CI 3.23 to 3.81) in men. Among women, the corresponding HRs were 7.26 (95% CI 6.16 to 8.57) and 3.94 (95% CI 3.60 to 4.30), respectively. Adjusting for the diagnosis of sickness absence partly attenuated the association between the length of sickness absence and the risk of disability retirement in all employed groups.
A long sickness absence is a strong predictor of disability retirement in all occupational classes. Preventing the accumulation of sickness absence days and designing more efficient policies for different occupational classes may be crucial to reduce the number of transitions to early retirement due to disability.
PubMed ID
29743328 View in PubMed
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Trajectories of disposable income among people of working ages diagnosed with multiple sclerosis: a nationwide register-based cohort study in Sweden 7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis with a population-based reference group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300074
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e020392
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-09-2018
Author
Chantelle Murley
Olof Mogard
Michael Wiberg
Kristina Alexanderson
Korinna Karampampa
Emilie Friberg
Petter Tinghög
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e020392
Date
05-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - economics - epidemiology
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To describe how disposable income (DI) and three main components changed, and analyse whether DI development differed from working-aged people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to a reference group from 7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis in Sweden.
Population-based cohort study, 12-year follow-up (7?years before to 4?years after diagnosis).
Swedish working-age population with microdata linked from two nationwide registers.
Residents diagnosed with MS in 2009 aged 25-59 years (n=785), and references without MS (n=7847) randomly selected with stratified matching (sex, age, education and country of birth).
DI was defined as the annual after tax sum of incomes (earnings and benefits) to measure individual economic welfare. Three main components of DI were analysed as annual sums: earnings, sickness absence benefits and disability pension benefits.
We found no differences in mean annual DI between people with and without MS by independent t-tests (p values between 0.15 and 0.96). Differences were found for all studied components of DI from diagnosis year by independent t-tests, for example, in the final study year (2013): earnings (-64 867 Swedish Krona (SEK); 95%?CI-79 203 to -50 528); sickness absence benefits (13 330 SEK; 95%?CI 10?042 to 16 500); and disability pension benefits (21 360 SEK; 95%?CI 17?380 to 25 350). A generalised estimating equation evaluated DI trajectory development between people with and without MS to find both trajectories developed in parallel, both before (-4039 SEK; 95%?CI -10?536 to 2458) and after (-781 SEK; 95%?CI -6988 to 5360) diagnosis.
The key finding of parallel DI trajectory development between working-aged MS and references suggests minimal economic impact within the first 4 years of diagnosis. The Swedish welfare system was responsive to the observed reductions in earnings around MS diagnosis through balancing DI with morbidity-related benefits. Future decreases in economic welfare may be experienced as the disease progresses, although thorough investigation with future studies of modern cohorts are required.
PubMed ID
29743325 View in PubMed
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Assessing health, quality of life and urogenital function in a sample of the Swedish general population: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300075
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 05; 8(5):e021974
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-05-2018
Author
David Bock
Eva Angenete
Elisabeth Gonzales
Jane Heath
Eva Haglind
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 05; 8(5):e021974
Date
05-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coitus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Defecation
Depression
Female
Health status
Humans
Intestines
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Sexual Health
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Urination
Urogenital System
Abstract
Evaluate the urinary, bowel and sexual function as well as stress symptoms and depression in a sample of the Swedish population.
A random sample of Swedish men and women in age groups from 30 to 89 years, a total of 3000 individuals, were contacted and after receiving informed consent, a questionnaire was sent.
Measures of urinary, bowel, sexual function and quality of life.
The questionnaire was sent to 2094 individuals who gave informed consent. The questionnaire was answered by 1078 individuals. Quality of life, stress symptoms and depressed mood were relatively constant across age groups for both men and women. Urinary function differed significantly across gender and age groups, but bowel function was relatively unaffected by age. Overall bowel dysfunction was slightly more prevalent among women compared with men. For both men and women, the frequency of intercourse or other sexual activities decreased with age, whereas sexually associated distress increased by age in men, but decreased among women.
In a general population, the urinary function varied across age and sex. Overall bowel dysfunction was slightly more prevalent among women compared with men. Sexually associated distress increased by age for men, but decreased for women.
NCT02392923; Results.
PubMed ID
29730632 View in PubMed
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Light-moderate alcohol consumption and left ventricular function among healthy, middle-aged adults: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300076
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 03; 8(5):e020777
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-03-2018
Author
Katalin Gémes
Imre Janszky
Linn Beate Strand
Krisztina D László
Staffan Ahnve
Lars J Vatten
Håvard Dalen
Kenneth J Mukamal
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 03; 8(5):e020777
Date
05-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Heart Ventricles - diagnostic imaging
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
To investigate the association between alcohol consumption and left ventricular (LV) function in a population with low average alcohol intake.
A total of 1296 healthy participants, free from cardiovascular diseases, were randomly selected from the third wave of the Norwegian HUNT study (2006-2008) and underwent echocardiography. After validation of the inclusion criteria, 30 participants were excluded due to arrhythmias or myocardial or valvular pathology. Alcohol consumption, sociodemographic and major cardiovascular risk factors were assessed by questionnaires and clinical examination in the HUNT3. General linear models were used to analyse the cross-sectional associations between alcohol intake and LV indices.
LV functional and structural indices were measured with tissue Doppler and speckle tracking echocardiography.
We observed no associations between alcohol consumption and multivariable-adjusted LV functional indices. Excluding abstainers who reported regular alcohol consumption 10 years prior to the baseline did not change the results. Alcohol consumption was positively associated with LV mass indices (p
PubMed ID
29724742 View in PubMed
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Possible case of trichinellosis associated with beaver (Castor fiber) meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300077
Source
J Helminthol. 2019 May; 93(3):372-374
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
May-2019
Author
A M Bronstein
A N Lukashev
Author Affiliation
Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology,Tropical and Vector Borne Diseases,Sechenov University,Moscow,Russia.
Source
J Helminthol. 2019 May; 93(3):372-374
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Albendazole - administration & dosage
Animals
Anthelmintics - administration & dosage
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Meat
Moscow
Rodentia
Trichinellosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although there have been occasional reports of rare and low-level trichinellae infestation in beavers, no human cases of beaver-associated trichinellosis have been described. This report presents a possible case of human trichinellosis linked to beaver meat. Increasing consumption of beaver meat necessitates raising awareness of this potential source of trichinellosis.
PubMed ID
29720291 View in PubMed
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Carpal tunnel release: Lifetime prevalence, annual incidence, and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300078
Source
Muscle Nerve. 2018 10; 58(4):497-502
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2018
Author
Mohammad-Hossein Pourmemari
Markku Heliövaara
Eira Viikari-Juntura
Rahman Shiri
Author Affiliation
Tampere Faculty of Social Sciences, Health Sciences, 33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Muscle Nerve. 2018 10; 58(4):497-502
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome - epidemiology - surgery
Decompression, Surgical - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Joints
Health Care Costs
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We estimated the lifetime prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel release (CTR) and identified risk factors for CTR.
The study population consisted of individuals aged =30 years living in Finland during 2000-2001 (N?=?6,256) and was linked to the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from 2000 to 2011.
Lifetime prevalence of CTR was 3.1%, and incidence rate was 1.73 per 1,000 person-years. Female sex (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]?=?1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), age of 40-49 years (HR?=?2.5, CI 1.7-3.8 compared with other age groups), education (HR?=?0.6, CI 0.4-0.9 for high level vs. low/medium level), obesity (HR?=?1.7, CI 1.2-2.5 for body mass index =30 vs.?
Notes
CommentIn: Muscle Nerve. 2018 Oct;58(4):467-469 PMID 29679379
PubMed ID
29665085 View in PubMed
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Assessment of intake of copper and lead by sheep grazing on a shooting range for small arms: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300079
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7337-7346
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Ida Vaa Johnsen
Espen Mariussen
Øyvind Voie
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), 2007, Kjeller, Norway. ida-vaa.johnsen@ffi.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Mar; 26(8):7337-7346
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Copper - administration & dosage - analysis
Diet
Eating
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Feeding Behavior
Firearms
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Liver - metabolism
Military Personnel
Norway
Poaceae - chemistry
Sheep
Soil - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - administration & dosage - analysis
Titanium - analysis
Abstract
The Norwegian Armed Forces' shooting ranges contain contamination by metals such as lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) and are often used as grazing pastures for livestock. To determine whether the sheep were at risk from grazing at a shooting range in Nord-Trøndelag (the Leksdalen shooting field), a study was conducted wherein the aim was to determine the amount of soil the sheep were eating, the accumulation of Cu and Pb in the livers of lambs grazing on the shooting ranges, and the accumulation of Pb and Cu in the grass. The grazing behavior of the sheep was mapped using GPS tracking and wildlife cameras. Soil, grass, feces, and liver samples were collected. All the samples were analyzed for Pb, Cu, and molybdenum (Mo), and soil and feces were also analyzed for titanium (Ti). Mean concentrations in grass, soil, feces, and liver was 41-7189, 1.3-29, 4-5, and 0.3 mg/kg Pb, respectively, and 42-580, 4.2-11.9, 19-23, and 273 mg/kg Cu, respectively. The soil ingestion rate was calculated using Ti in feces and soil. From these results, the theoretical dose of Cu and Pb ingested by grazing sheep was calculated. The soil ingestion rate was found to be 0.1-0.4%, significantly lower than the soil ingestion rate of 5-30% usually used for sheep. Little or no accumulation of Cu and Pb in the grass was found. There was no difference between the metal concentrations in the washed and unwashed grass. According to the calculated dose, the sheep were at little or no risk of acute or chronic Pb and Cu poisoning from grazing on the Leksdalen shooting range. The analysis of liver samples showed that lambs grazing on the shooting range did not have higher levels of Cu or Pb than lambs grazing elsewhere. None of the lambs had concentrations of Cu or Pb in their livers indicating poisoning.
PubMed ID
29644603 View in PubMed
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The Risk of Offspring Psychiatric Disorders in the Setting of Maternal Obesity and Diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300059
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 09; 142(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Linghua Kong
Gunnar Norstedt
Martin Schalling
Mika Gissler
Catharina Lavebratt
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 09; 142(3):
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neurodevelopmental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Prenatal exposure to metabolic disturbances is associated with increased risk of offspring neurodevelopmental impairment and autism spectrum disorder, while little is known about the joint effect of maternal obesity and diabetes. With this study, we aim to assess the joint effect of maternal obesity and diabetes on the risk for offspring psychiatric and mild neurodevelopmental disorders.
Nationwide registries were used to link data of all live births in Finland between 2004 and 2014 (n = 649?043). Cox proportional hazards modeling adjusting for potential confounders was applied to estimate the effect of maternal obesity, pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM), and gestational diabetes mellitus, as well as their joint effects, on the outcomes of offspring psychiatric and mild neurodevelopmental diagnoses and offspring prescription of psychotropic drugs.
Among mothers without diabetes, severely obese mothers had 67% to 88% increased risk of having a child with mild neurodevelopmental disorders (hazard risk ratio [HR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.54-1.86), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or conduct disorder (HR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.58-2.23), and psychotic, mood, and stress-related disorders (HR = 1.67; 95% CI = 1.31-2.13) compared with mothers with a normal BMI. PGDM implied a further risk increase for all groups of psychiatric diagnoses with onset in childhood or adolescence in mothers with severe obesity. Marked effects were found particularly for autism spectrum disorder (HR = 6.49; 95% CI = 3.08-13.69), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder (HR = 6.03; 95% CI = 3.23-11.24), and mixed disorders of conduct and emotions (HR = 4.29; 95% CI = 2.14-8.60). Gestational diabetes mellitus did not increase the risk highly for these offspring disorders.
Maternal PGDM combined with severe maternal obesity markedly increases the risk of several children's psychiatric and mild neurodevelopmental disorders.
PubMed ID
30093539 View in PubMed
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Oil type and temperature dependent biodegradation dynamics - Combining chemical and microbial community data through multivariate analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300060
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2018 08 07; 18(1):83
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-07-2018
Author
Deni Ribicic
Kelly Marie McFarlin
Roman Netzer
Odd Gunnar Brakstad
Anika Winkler
Mimmi Throne-Holst
Trond Røvik Størseth
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Ocean, Environment and New Resources, Brattørkaia 17C, 7010, Trondheim, Norway. deni.ribicic@sintef.no.
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2018 08 07; 18(1):83
Date
08-07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Bacteria - classification - genetics - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Cold Temperature
DNA, Bacterial
Hydrocarbons - metabolism
Lipids
Microbiota
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Oils - analysis - metabolism
Petroleum - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Seawater - microbiology
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
This study investigates a comparative multivariate approach for studying the biodegradation of chemically dispersed oil. The rationale for this approach lies in the inherent complexity of the data and challenges associated with comparing multiple experiments with inconsistent sampling points, with respect to inferring correlations and visualizing multiple datasets with numerous variables. We aim to identify novel correlations among microbial community composition, the chemical change of individual petroleum hydrocarbons, oil type and temperature by creating modelled datasets from inconsistent sampling time points. Four different incubation experiments were conducted with freshly collected Norwegian seawater and either Grane and Troll oil dispersed with Corexit 9500. Incubations were conducted at two different temperatures (5 °C and 13 °C) over a period of 64 days.
PCA analysis of modelled chemical datasets and calculated half-lives revealed differences in the biodegradation of individual hydrocarbons among temperatures and oil types. At 5 °C, most n-alkanes biodegraded faster in heavy Grane oil compared to light Troll oil. PCA analysis of modelled microbial community datasets reveal differences between temperature and oil type, especially at low temperature. For both oils, Colwelliaceae and Oceanospirillaceae were more prominent in the colder incubation (5 °C) than the warmer (13 °C). Overall, Colwelliaceae, Oceanospirillaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Alteromonadaceae and Piscirickettsiaceae consistently dominated the microbial community at both temperatures and in both oil types. Other families known to include oil-degrading bacteria were also identified, such as Alcanivoracaceae, Methylophilaceae, Sphingomonadaceae and Erythrobacteraceae, but they were all present in dispersed oil incubations at a low abundance (
PubMed ID
30086723 View in PubMed
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The role of anti-citrullinated protein antibody reactivities in an inception cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving treat-to-target therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300061
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2018 07 13; 20(1):146
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-13-2018
Author
Maria Karolina Jonsson
Aase Haj Hensvold
Monika Hansson
Anna-Birgitte Aga
Joseph Sexton
Linda Mathsson-Alm
Martin Cornillet
Guy Serre
Siri Lillegraven
Bjørg-Tilde Svanes Fevang
Anca Irinel Catrina
Espen Andre Haavardsholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Haukeland University Hospital, Pb 1400, NO-5021, Bergen, Norway. jonssonmk@gmail.com.
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2018 07 13; 20(1):146
Date
07-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies - immunology
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - immunology - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) reactivities precede clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and it has been suggested that ACPA reactivities towards distinct target proteins may be associated with differences in RA phenotypes. We aimed to assess the prevalence of baseline ACPA reactivities in an inception cohort of patients with early RA, and to investigate their associations with disease activity, treatment response, ultrasound findings and radiographic damage.
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naïve patients with early RA, classified according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, were included in the ARCTIC trial and assessed in the present analysis. During follow up, patients were monitored frequently and treatment was adjusted according to a predetermined protocol, starting with methotrexate monotherapy with prednisolone bridging. Analysis of 16 different ACPA reactivities targeting citrullinated peptides from fibrinogen, alpha-1 enolase, vimentin, filaggrin and histone was performed using a multiplex chip-based assay. Samples from 0, 3, 12 and 24 months were analysed. Controls were blood donors with similar characteristics to the patients (age, gender, smoking status).
A total of 217 patients and 94 controls were included. Median [25, 75 percentile] number of ACPA reactivities in all patients was 9 [4, 12], and were most prevalent in anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide /rheumatoid factor-positive patients 10 [7, 12]. Disease activity measures and ultrasound scores at baseline were lower in ACPA reactivity-positive compared to ACPA reactivity-negative patients. ACPA reactivity levels decreased after 3 months of DMARD treatment, most pronounced for fibrinogenß 60-74 to 62% of baseline antibody level, with least change in filaggrin 307-324 to 81% of baseline antibody level, both p?
PubMed ID
30001740 View in PubMed
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Reference Ranges and Determinants of Thyroid Function During Early Pregnancy: The SELMA Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300062
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 09 01; 103(9):3548-3556
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Arash Derakhshan
Huan Shu
Maarten A C Broeren
Ralph A de Poortere
Sverre Wikström
Robin P Peeters
Barbara Demeneix
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Tim I M Korevaar
Author Affiliation
Academic Center for Thyroid Diseases, Erasmus MC, GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 09 01; 103(9):3548-3556
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies - blood
Autoantigens - immunology
Body mass index
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Iodide Peroxidase - immunology
Iron-Binding Proteins - immunology
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Serum Screening Tests - methods - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Sweden
Thyroid Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Thyroid Hormones - blood - immunology
Thyrotropin - blood
Thyroxine - blood
Triiodothyronine - blood
Abstract
Establishing reference ranges as well as identifying and quantifying the determinants of thyroid function during pregnancy is important for proper clinical interpretation and optimizing research efforts. However, such data are sparse, specifically for triiodothyronine measurements, and most studies do not take into account thyroid antibodies or human chorionic gonadotropin.
To determine reference ranges and to identify/quantify determinants of TSH, free T4 (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total T4 (TT4), and total triiodothyronine (TT3).
This study included 2314 participants of the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal, Mother and child, Asthma and allergy study, a population-based prospective pregnancy cohort of mother-child pairs. Reference ranges were calculated by 2.5th to 97.5th percentiles after excluding thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOAb)-positive and/or thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb)-positive women.
None.
TSH, FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 in prenatal serum.
After exclusion of TPOAb-positive women, reference ranges were as follows: TSH, 0.11 to 3.48 mU/L; FT4, 11.6 to 19.4 pmol/L; FT3, 3.72 to 5.92 pg/mL; TT4, 82.4 to 166.2 pmol/L; and TT3, 1.28 to 2.92 nmol/L. Additional exclusion of TgAb-positive women did not change the reference ranges substantially. Exposure to tobacco smoke, as assessed by questionnaires and serum cotinine, was associated with lower TSH and higher FT3 and TT3. Body mass index (BMI) and gestational age were the main determinants of TSH (only for BMI), FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3.
We show that the exclusion of TgAb-positive women on top of excluding TPOAb-positive women hardly affects clinical reference ranges. We identified various relevant clinical determinants of TSH, FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 that could reflect endocrine-disrupting effects and/or effects on thyroid hormone transport or deiodination.
PubMed ID
29982605 View in PubMed
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Short-term longitudinal changes in adult dental fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300063
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2018 08; 126(4):300-306
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Outi Hagqvist
Mimmi Tolvanen
Kari Rantavuori
Linnea Karlsson
Hasse Karlsson
Satu Lahti
Author Affiliation
FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2018 08; 126(4):300-306
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate (i) longitudinal fluctuations and considerable changes in adult fear at five data-collection points during a 2.5-yr period and (ii) the stability of symptoms of depression in dental fear-change groups. Pilot data from the FinnBrain Birth Cohort study, of 254 families expecting a baby, were used. Data-collection points (DCPs) were: 18-20 and 32-34 gestational weeks; and 3, 12, and 24 months after delivery. At baseline, 119 women and 85 men completed the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) questionnaire. At all DCPs, 57 (48%) women and 35 (41%) men completed MDAS. Depression was measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Changes in MDAS were analyzed using general linear modelling for repeated measures. Stability of dental fear was assessed using dichotomized MDAS scores. Dental fear among women decreased statistically significantly in late pregnancy and increased thereafter. Among men, dental fear tended to increase in late pregnancy and decreased afterwards. Depression scores varied in high and fluctuating fear groups but the differences diminished towards the last DCP. Dental fear among adults experiencing a major life event does not seem to be stable. Clinicians should take this into account. The mechanisms behind these changes need further research.
PubMed ID
29943867 View in PubMed
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Dispersal limitation and thermodynamic constraints govern spatial structure of permafrost microbial communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300064
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 08 01; 94(8):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-01-2018
Author
Eric M Bottos
David W Kennedy
Elvira B Romero
Sarah J Fansler
Joseph M Brown
Lisa M Bramer
Rosalie K Chu
Malak M Tfaily
Janet K Jansson
James C Stegen
Author Affiliation
Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA, 99352, USA.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 08 01; 94(8):
Date
08-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Environment
Freezing
Iron - metabolism
Microbiota - genetics
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - microbiology
Taiga
Thermodynamics
Abstract
Understanding drivers of permafrost microbial community composition is critical for understanding permafrost microbiology and predicting ecosystem responses to thaw. We hypothesize that permafrost communities are shaped by physical constraints imposed by prolonged freezing, and exhibit spatial distributions that reflect dispersal limitation and selective pressures associated with these physical constraints. To test this, we characterized patterns of environmental variation and microbial community composition in permafrost across an Alaskan boreal forest landscape. We used null modeling to estimate the importance of selective and neutral assembly processes on community composition, and identified environmental factors influencing ecological selection through regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). Proportionally, the strongest process influencing community composition was dispersal limitation (0.36), exceeding the influence of homogenous selection (0.21), variable selection (0.16) and homogenizing dispersal (0.05). Fe(II) content was the most important factor explaining variable selection, and was significantly associated with total selection by univariate regression (R2 = 0.14, P = 0.003). SEM supported a model in which Fe(II) content mediated influences of the Gibbs free energy of the organic matter pool and organic acid concentration on total selection. These findings suggest that the dominant processes shaping microbial communities in permafrost result from the stability of the permafrost environment, which imposes dispersal and thermodynamic constraints.
PubMed ID
29912311 View in PubMed
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Reflections on the provision of veterinary services to underserved regions: A case example using northern Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300065
Source
Can Vet J. 2018 05; 59(5):491-499
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Caroline Boissonneault
Tasha Epp
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health (Boissonneault), Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine (Epp), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 2Z4.
Source
Can Vet J. 2018 05; 59(5):491-499
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Welfare
Animals
Bites and Stings
Data Collection
Dogs
Humans
Manitoba
Ownership
Population Control
Public Health
Rural Population
Veterinary Medicine
Abstract
Rural, remote, and Indigenous communities often contend with free-roaming dog populations, increasing the risk of aggressive dog encounters, particularly dog bites and fatal dog attacks. This qualitative survey gathered a range of perspectives to ascertain the current veterinary services available in rural, remote, and Indigenous communities of northern Manitoba, as well as needs, barriers to, and considerations for future veterinary care provision. Survey results indicated terminology such as "overpopulation" and "rescue" need to be carefully considered as they may have negative connotations for communities. While veterinary services such as vaccination and deworming are important for public health, most programs were focused on sterilization. There was consensus that conversations must begin with individual communities to determine what services are needed and how to fulfil those needs. Perceived barriers include the remoteness of communities, finances, and culturally different views of veterinary medicine. Recommendations for future delivery of services include increased frequency and funding of current models, while others focused on different methods of delivery; all of which will require further discussions within the veterinary community and with other stakeholders.
Réflexions concernant la prestation de services vétérinaires dans les régions insuffisamment desservies : exemple de cas dans le nord du Manitoba, au Canada. Les collectivités autochtones rurales et éloignées doivent souvent gérer des populations de chiens errants, ce qui augmente le risque de rencontres avec des chiens agressifs, particulièrement des morsures de chien et d’attaques mortelles par des chiens. Cette enquête qualitative a réuni un éventail de points de vue afin de déterminer les services vétérinaires actuellement disponibles dans les collectivités autochtones rurales et éloignées dans le nord du Manitoba, ainsi que les besoins, les obstacles et les considérations pour la prestation future de soins vétérinaires. Les résultats de l’enquête ont indiqué que la terminologie de «surpopulation» ou de «secours» doit être soigneusement considérée car elle évoque des connotations négatives pour les collectivités. Même si les services vétérinaires comme la vaccination et la vermifugation sont importants pour la santé publique, la plupart des programmes se concentraient sur la stérilisation. Il y avait un consensus que les conversations doivent être entamées dans les collectivités individuelles afin de déterminer les services qui sont requis et comment répondre à ces besoins. Les obstacles perçus incluent l’éloignement des collectivités, les finances et des vues culturelles différentes de la médecine vétérinaire. Des recommandations pour la prestation future de services incluent une fréquence accrue et le financement des modèles actuels, tandis que d’autres portent sur des modes de prestation différents. Toutes ces recommandations exigeront des discussions approfondies au sein de la collectivité vétérinaire et avec les autres intervenants.(Traduit par Isabelle Vallières).
PubMed ID
29904201 View in PubMed
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Diversity and functionality of archaeal, bacterial and fungal communities in deep Archaean bedrock groundwater.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300066
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 08 01; 94(8):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2018
Author
Lotta Purkamo
Riikka Kietäväinen
Hanna Miettinen
Elina Sohlberg
Ilmo Kukkonen
Merja Itävaara
Malin Bomberg
Author Affiliation
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 02044 VTT, Finland.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 08 01; 94(8):
Date
08-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Archaea - classification - genetics
Bacteria - classification - genetics
Ecosystem
Finland
Fungi - classification - genetics
Groundwater - microbiology
Methane - metabolism
Microbiota
Mycobiome
Phylogeny
Soil Microbiology
Sulfates - metabolism
Abstract
The diversity and metabolic functions of deep subsurface ecosystems remain relatively unexplored. Microbial communities in previously studied deep subsurface sites of the Fennoscandian Shield are distinctive to each site. Thus, we hypothesized that the microbial communities of the deep Archaean bedrock fracture aquifer in Romuvaara, northern Finland, differ both in community composition and metabolic functionality from the other sites in the Fennoscandian Shield. We characterized the composition, functionality and substrate preferences of the microbial communities at different depths in a 600 m deep borehole. In contrast to other Fennoscandian deep biosphere communities studied to date, iron-oxidizing Gallionella dominated the bacterial communities, while methanogenic and ammonia-oxidizing archaea were the most prominent archaea, and a diverse fungal community was also detected. Potential for methane cycling and sulfate and nitrate reduction was confirmed by detection of the functional genes of these metabolic pathways. Organotrophs were less abundant, although carbohydrates were the most preferred of the tested substrates. The microbial communities shared features with those detected from other deep groundwaters with similar geochemistry, but the majority of taxa distinctive to Romuvaara are different from the taxa previously detected in saline deep groundwater in the Fennoscandian Shield, most likely because of the differences in water chemistry.
PubMed ID
29893836 View in PubMed
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