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Cortical thickness of planum temporale and pars opercularis in native language tone processing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297754
Source
Brain Lang. 2018 01; 176:42-47
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Andrea Schremm
Mikael Novén
Merle Horne
Pelle Söderström
Danielle van Westen
Mikael Roll
Author Affiliation
Department of Linguistics and Phonetics, Lund University, Box 201, 22100 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: andrea.schremm@ling.lu.se.
Source
Brain Lang. 2018 01; 176:42-47
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Auditory Perception - physiology
Brain Mapping - methods
Broca Area - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Cerebral Cortex - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Female
Humans
Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Organ Size
Reaction Time - physiology
Sweden
Temporal Lobe - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study investigated the relationship between linguistic tone processing and cortical thickness of bilateral planum temporale (PT) and pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (IFGpo). Swedish tones on word stems function as cues to upcoming endings. Correlating structural brain imaging data with participants' response time patterns for suffixes, we found that thicker cortex in the left PT was associated with greater reliance on tones to anticipate upcoming inflections on real words. On inflected pseudoword stems, however, the cortical thickness of left IFGpo was associated with tone-suffix processing. Thus cortical thickness of the left PT might play a role in processing tones as part of stored representations for familiar speech segments, most likely when inflected forms are accessed as whole words. In the absence of stored representations, listeners might need to rely on morphosyntactic rules specifying tone-suffix associations, potentially facilitated by greater cortical thickness of left IFGpo.
PubMed ID
29223785 View in PubMed
Less detail

Thyroid FNA diagnostics in a real-life setting: Experiences of the implementation of the Bethesda system in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297752
Source
Cytopathology. 2018 04; 29(2):189-195
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
04-2018
Author
I Paajanen
S Metso
P Jaatinen
I Kholová
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Cytopathology. 2018 04; 29(2):189-195
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma, Follicular - diagnosis - pathology
Adult
Aged
Biopsy, Fine-Needle - methods - standards
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Thyroid Gland - pathology
Thyroid Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
Abstract
The Bethesda system is widely accepted for thyroid FNA diagnostics, but has scarcely been analysed in relation to clinical background data. Our aim was to analyse the thyroid FNA diagnostic process in view of clinical data, and to assess the validity of the Bethesda system during the first year of implementation.
There were 415 thyroid FNAs taken from 363 patients during October 2011-September 2012 in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Finland. The median age of the patients was 59 years, and the female-to-male ratio 4:1. Clinical data were collected from patient registries, and thyroid FNA and histopathological data from the pathology registry.
The Bethesda categories were represented as follows: 94 non-diagnostic cases (26%); 177 benign (49%); 32 atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (9%); 31 follicular neoplasm (9%); 20 suspicious for malignancy (5%); and nine malignant cases (2%). Only 23 (24%) of the non-diagnostic samples and 18 (56%) of the atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance led to repeat FNA. Thyroid cancer was histopathologically diagnosed in 28 cases (8%). When the categories requiring surgical treatment were considered true positive findings, the sensitivity of the Bethesda system was 90%, and specificity was 70%. Interobserver accuracy was 86%.
Already during the first year of implementation, the Bethesda system proved reliable in evaluating the risk of thyroid malignancy. Nevertheless, the clinical judgement of the indication of ultrasound/FNA and management according to the FNA findings need improvement. The relatively high proportion of non-diagnostic FNAs could be diminished by obtaining the samples by radiologists experienced in ultrasound-guided FNA techniques.
PubMed ID
29251367 View in PubMed
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Quantitative risk assessment of salmon louse-induced mortality of seaward-migrating post-smolt Atlantic salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297753
Source
Epidemics. 2018 06; 23:19-33
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
06-2018
Author
Anja Bråthen Kristoffersen
Lars Qviller
Kari Olli Helgesen
Knut Wiik Vollset
Hildegunn Viljugrein
Peder Andreas Jansen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Veterinary Institute, PB. 750 Sentrum, N-0106 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Epidemics. 2018 06; 23:19-33
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Copepoda
Disease Models, Animal
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Fish Diseases - mortality - parasitology
Norway
Risk assessment
Salmo salar - parasitology
Abstract
The Norwegian government recently implemented a new management system to regulate salmon farming in Norway, aiming to promote environmentally sustainable growth in the aquaculture industry. The Norwegian coast has been divided into 13 production zones and the volume of salmonid production in the zones will be regulated based on salmon lice effects on wild salmonids. Here we present a model for assessing salmon louse-induced mortality of seaward-migrating post-smolts of Atlantic salmon. The model quantifies expected salmon lice infestations and louse-induced mortality of migrating post-smolt salmon from 401 salmon rivers draining into Norwegian coastal waters. It is assumed that migrating post-smolts follow the shortest path from river outlets to the high seas, at constant progression rates. During this migration, fish are infested by salmon lice of farm origin according to an empirical infestation model. Furthermore, louse-induced mortality is estimated from the estimated louse infestations. Rivers draining into production zones on the West Coast of Norway were at the highest risk of adverse lice effects. In comparison, rivers draining into northerly production zones, along with the southernmost production zone, were at lower risk. After adjusting for standing stock biomass, estimates of louse-egg output varied by factors of up to 8 between production zones. Correlation between biomass adjusted output of louse infestation and densities of farmed salmon in the production zones suggests that a large-scale density-dependent host-parasite effect is a major driver of louse infestation rates and parasite-induced mortality. The estimates are sensitive to many of the processes in the chain of events in the model. Nevertheless, we argue that the model is suited to assess spatial and temporal risks associated with farm-origin salmon lice.
PubMed ID
29233546 View in PubMed
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Risk of cardiac rhythm disturbances and aortic regurgitation in different spondyloarthritis subtypes in comparison with general population: a register-based study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297751
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2018 04; 77(4):541-548
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Karin Bengtsson
Helena Forsblad-d'Elia
Elisabeth Lie
Eva Klingberg
Mats Dehlin
Sofia Exarchou
Ulf Lindström
Johan Askling
Lennart T H Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2018 04; 77(4):541-548
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Insufficiency - epidemiology - etiology
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Arthritis, Psoriatic - complications
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - therapy
Atrioventricular Block - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pacemaker, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Spondylarthritis - complications
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the incidence of atrioventricular (AV) block II-III, atrial fibrillation (AF), pacemaker implantation (PM) and aortic regurgitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (uSpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) compared with the general population (GP) and with each other.
A prospective nationwide study with cohorts of patients with AS (n=6448), PsA (n=16?063) and uSpA (n=5190) and a GP (n=2?66?435) cohort, identified in 2001-2009 in the Swedish National Patient and Population registers. Follow-up began on 1 January 2006 and ended at event, death, emigration or 31 December 2012. Age-standardised and sex-standardised incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated.
The highest incidence rates were noted for AF (5.5-7.4 events per 1000 person-years), followed by PM (1.0-2.0 events per 1000 person-years). HRs for AV block, AF, PM and aortic regurgitation were significantly increased in AS (HRs 2.3, 1.3, 2.1 and 1.9), uSpA (HRs 2.9, 1.3, 1.9 and 2.0) and PsA (HRs 1.5, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.8) compared with the GP cohort. The highest HRs were seen for AV block in male uSpA (HR 4.2) and AS (HR 2.5) compared with GP. Compared with PsA, significantly increased HRs were noted for PM (HR 1.5) in AS and for AV block (HR 1.8) in uSpA.
Patients with SpA are at increased risk of aortic regurgitation, cardiac rhythm disturbances and, as a probable consequence, also PM. Particularly for AF, the most common arrhythmia, increased caution is warranted, whereas AV block should be looked for especially in men with AS or uSpA.
PubMed ID
29259045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gender differences in the well-being of patients diagnosed with Chlamydia trachomatis: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297749
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2018 09; 94(6):401-405
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Nirina Andersson
Helena Carré
Urban Janlert
Jens Boman
Elisabet Nylander
Author Affiliation
Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2018 09; 94(6):401-405
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Sex Factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Social Stigma
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We aimed to investigate how an infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) influenced patients' well-being and whether there were differences due to gender, age or relationship status, in an effort to strengthen preventive measures and provide better healthcare for patients with CT.
Patients diagnosed with CT in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden, were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their feelings, thoughts and actions after CT diagnosis. The patients were also asked to fill in the validated questionnaires Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Between February 2015 and January 2017, 128 patients (74 women and 54 men) were included in the study.
After being diagnosed with CT, men were generally less worried than women (P
PubMed ID
29306870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing Faces of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Treatment Effects by Cluster Designation in the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297750
Source
Sleep. 2018 03 01; 41(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
03-01-2018
Author
Grace W Pien
Lichuan Ye
Brendan T Keenan
Greg Maislin
Erla Björnsdóttir
Erna Sif Arnardottir
Bryndis Benediktsdottir
Thorarinn Gislason
Allan I Pack
Author Affiliation
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
Source
Sleep. 2018 03 01; 41(3):
Date
03-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - methods - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys - trends
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Wakefulness - physiology
Abstract
Distinct clinical phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been identified: Disturbed Sleep, Minimally Symptomatic, and Sleepy. Determining whether these phenotypes respond differently to standard treatment helps us to create a foundation for personalized therapies. We compared responses to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy in these clinical OSA phenotypes.
The study sample included 706 patients from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort with moderate-to-severe OSA who were prescribed PAP. Linear and logistic mixed models were used to compare 2-year changes in demographics, comorbid diseases, and sleep-related health issues within and across OSA clinical phenotypes. Relationships between changes in symptoms and PAP adherence were also examined.
Overall, effect sizes were moderate to large when comparing sleepiness, insomnia-related, and apneic symptom changes in the Sleepy group with changes in other two groups, especially those in the Minimally Symptomatic group. Within the Disturbed Sleep group, PAP users and nonusers demonstrated similar changes in insomnia-related symptoms. The Minimally Symptomatic group remained relatively asymptomatic, but reported significant decreases in daytime sleepiness and physical fatigue; PAP users generally had larger improvements. The Sleepy group had reductions in nearly all measured symptoms, including large reductions in drowsy driving; almost all of these improvements were greater among PAP users than nonusers.
OSA treatment response patterns differed by initial clinical phenotype and PAP adherence. Individuals with insomnia-related symptoms may require additional targeted therapy for these complaints. These findings underscore the need for a personalized approach to management that recognizes patients with a range of OSA presentations.
Notes
CommentIn: Sleep. 2018 Mar 1;41(3): PMID 29538762
PubMed ID
29301021 View in PubMed
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Recognizable clinical subtypes of obstructive sleep apnea across international sleep centers: a cluster analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297748
Source
Sleep. 2018 03 01; 41(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-01-2018
Author
Brendan T Keenan
Jinyoung Kim
Bhajan Singh
Lia Bittencourt
Ning-Hung Chen
Peter A Cistulli
Ulysses J Magalang
Nigel McArdle
Jesse W Mindel
Bryndis Benediktsdottir
Erna Sif Arnardottir
Lisa Kristin Prochnow
Thomas Penzel
Bernd Sanner
Richard J Schwab
Chol Shin
Kate Sutherland
Sergio Tufik
Greg Maislin
Thorarinn Gislason
Allan I Pack
Author Affiliation
Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.
Source
Sleep. 2018 03 01; 41(3):
Date
03-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Iceland - epidemiology
Internationality
Male
Middle Aged
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
A recent study of patients with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in Iceland identified three clinical clusters based on symptoms and comorbidities. We sought to verify this finding in a new cohort in Iceland and examine the generalizability of OSA clusters in an international ethnically diverse cohort.
Using data on 972 patients with moderate-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] = 15 events per hour) recruited from the Sleep Apnea Global Interdisciplinary Consortium (SAGIC), we performed a latent class analysis of 18 self-reported symptom variables, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.
The original OSA clusters of disturbed sleep, minimally symptomatic, and excessively sleepy replicated among 215 SAGIC patients from Iceland. These clusters also generalized to 757 patients from five other countries. The three clusters had similar average AHI values in both Iceland and the international samples, suggesting clusters are not driven by OSA severity; differences in age, gender, and body mass index were also generally small. Within the international sample, the three original clusters were expanded to five optimal clusters: three were similar to those in Iceland (labeled disturbed sleep, minimal symptoms, and upper airway symptoms with sleepiness) and two were new, less symptomatic clusters (labeled upper airway symptoms dominant and sleepiness dominant). The five clusters showed differences in demographics and AHI, although all were middle-aged (44.6-54.5 years), obese (30.6-35.9 kg/m2), and had severe OSA (42.0-51.4 events per hour) on average.
Results confirm and extend previously identified clinical clusters in OSA. These clusters provide an opportunity for a more personalized approach to the management of OSA.
Notes
CommentIn: Sleep. 2018 Mar 1;41(3): PMID 29538762
PubMed ID
29315434 View in PubMed
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Chronic Lung Disease and Mortality after Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297747
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2018 10; 32(5):2241-2245
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2018
Author
Dmitry Ponomarev
Oksana Kamenskaya
Asya Klinkova
Irina Loginova
Pavel Vedernikov
Igor Kornilov
Vladimir Shmyrev
Vladimir Lomivorotov
Aleksander Chernavskiy
Aleksander Karaskov
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Meshalkin National Medical Research Centre, Novosibirsk, Russia. Electronic address: d_ponomarev@meshalkin.ru.
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2018 10; 32(5):2241-2245
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - mortality
Comorbidity - trends
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the 1-year survival in cardiac surgical patients with lung disease, including previously undiagnosed cases.
Prospective cohort study.
Tertiary hospital.
Patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.
None.
Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were performed in 454 patients before surgery. Abnormal respiratory patterns were defined as follows: obstructive (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity
Notes
CommentIn: J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2018 Oct;32(5):2246-2247 PMID 29530398
CommentIn: J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2018 Oct;32(5):e1-e2 PMID 29673762
PubMed ID
29336961 View in PubMed
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Detection of Dementia Cases in Two Swedish Health Registers: A Validation Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297746
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 61(4):1301-1310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies
Date
2018
Author
Debora Rizzuto
Adina L Feldman
Ida K Karlsson
Anna K Dahl Aslan
Margaret Gatz
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 61(4):1301-1310
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Twin Studies as Topic
Abstract
Population-based health registers are potential assets in epidemiological research; however, the quality of case ascertainment is crucial.
To compare the case ascertainment of dementia, from the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Cause of Death Register (CDR) with dementia diagnoses from six Swedish population based studies.
Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of dementia identification in NPR and CDR were estimated by individual record linkage with six Swedish population based studies (n?=?19,035). Time to detection in NPR was estimated using data on dementia incidence from longitudinal studies with more than two decades of follow-up.
Barely half of the dementia cases were ever detected by NPR or CDR. Using data from longitudinal studies we estimated that a record with a dementia diagnosis appears in the NPR on average 5.5 years after first diagnosis. Although the ability of the registers to detect dementia cases was moderate, the ability to detect non-dementia cases was almost perfect (99%). When registers indicate that there is a dementia diagnosis, there are very few instances in which the clinicians determined the person was not demented. Indeed, PPVs were close to 90%. However, misclassification between dementia subtype diagnoses is quite common, especially in NPR.
Although the overall sensitivity is low, the specificity and the positive predictive value are very high. This suggests that hospital and death registers can be used to identify dementia cases in the community, but at the cost of missing a large proportion of the cases.
PubMed ID
29376854 View in PubMed
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The Progression of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease During a Five-Year Follow-Up: Kuopio ALSOVA Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297745
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 61(4):1367-1376
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilona Hallikainen
Kristiina Hongisto
Tarja Välimäki
Tuomo Hänninen
Janne Martikainen
Anne M Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 61(4):1367-1376
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Caregivers
Delusions - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Finland
Hallucinations - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Motor Activity
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
An improved understanding of the role of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has recently emerged. NPS lead to hospitalization and caregiver stress, but are more variable during the course of the disease than other symptoms. Knowledge about the role of specific NPS in disease progression and prognosis is especially limited.
To examine the relationship between specific NPS and AD severity during a 5-year follow-up period, and to determine which baseline NPS predict AD progression.
236 persons with very mild (CDR 0.5) or mild (CDR 1) AD at baseline and their caregivers were followed up for five years as part of the ALSOVA study. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to assess NPS, and AD severity progression was measured with the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes. Data was analyzed with Generalized Estimated Equations and Linear Mixed Models.
The baseline NPS that best predicted AD progression were delusions, agitation, and aberrant motor behavior, while AD severity during follow-up was associated with hallucinations, delusions, agitation, apathy, aberrant motor behavior, and sleep and appetite disturbances.
Persons with mild AD presenting delusions, agitation, and aberrant motor behavior at the time of diagnosis could have a more rapidly progressing disease, and some NPS are associated with AD severity. These results highlight the importance of evaluating NPS at the time of AD diagnosis, and the need to offer additional support to persons presenting delusions, agitation and aberrant motor behavior, and their caregivers.
PubMed ID
29376861 View in PubMed
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Maternal and Paternal Height and the Risk of Preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297743
Source
Hypertension. 2018 04; 71(4):666-670
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Yunsung Lee
Per Magnus
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Genetic Research and Bioinformatics (Y.L.) and Centre for Fertility and Health (P.M.), Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. yunsung.lee@fhi.no.
Source
Hypertension. 2018 04; 71(4):666-670
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Biometric Identification - methods
Body Height
Body Weight
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Fathers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The etiology of preeclampsia is unknown. Tall women have been found to have lower incidence of preeclampsia. This points to a possible biological causal effect but may be because of socioeconomic confounding. We used paternal height as an unexposed control to examine confounding. The MoBa (Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study) was used to extract data on parental heights, maternal prepregnancy weight, other background factors, and pregnancy outcomes for 99?968 singleton births. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for preeclampsia according to parental height. The adjusted odds ratio for preeclampsia was 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66-0.82) for women >172 cm as compared with women 186 cm was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.93-1.15) compared with men
PubMed ID
29463626 View in PubMed
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Preferences for treatment among adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: a national study using a discrete choice experiment model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297744
Source
Diabet Med. 2018 05; 35(5):621-629
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
G Forsander
S Stallknecht
U Samuelsson
C Marcus
M Bøgelund
Author Affiliation
Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska Achademy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2018 05; 35(5):621-629
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Choice Behavior
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - metabolism
Ear - abnormalities
Ear Diseases
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Patient Preference
Self Care
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
To test the possibility of using a discrete choice experiment model, on a national level in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, in order to obtain a better understanding of drivers of and barriers to diabetes self-care.
A survey instrument was constructed and tested on a small group of the target population: adolescents aged 15 to
PubMed ID
29381816 View in PubMed
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Self-perceived risk of STIs in a population-based study of Scandinavian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297741
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2018 11; 94(7):522-527
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
Sonia Guleria
Mette Tuxen Faber
Bo T Hansen
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Kai-Li Liaw
Christian Munk
Mari Nygård
Susanne Krüger Kjær
Author Affiliation
Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2018 11; 94(7):522-527
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Coitus
Condoms - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex - psychology
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - psychology - virology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the associations between current behaviours/characteristics and self-perceived risk for STIs, among randomly selected women aged 18-45?years from Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
A population-based, cross-sectional, questionnaire study (paper based, web based and telephone based) was conducted during 2011-2012. We compared medium-high STI risk perception with no/low risk perception. The associations were explored for women who had ever had sexual intercourse and for women with a new partner in the last 6?months using multivariable logistic regression.
The overall prevalence of medium-high STI risk perception was 7.4%. It was highest among women aged 18-24?years (16.2%) and among the Danish women (8.8%). Number of new sexual partners in the last 6?months (=3vs 0 partners, OR 14.94, 95%?CI 13.20 to 16.94) was strongly associated with medium-high STI risk perception. Among women with a new partner in the last 6?months, lack of condom use increased medium-high STI risk perception (OR 1.73, 95%?CI 1.52 to 1.96). Genital warts in the last year, binge drinking and being single were associated with increased risk perception and remained statistically significant after additional adjustments were made for number of new partners and condom use with new partners in the last 6?months.
Subjective perception of risk for STI was associated with women's current risk-taking behaviours, indicating women generally are able to assess their risks for STIs. However, a considerable proportion of women with multiple new partners in the last 6?months and no condom use still considered themselves at no/low risk for STI.
PubMed ID
29523719 View in PubMed
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Organizational justice and health: Studying mental preoccupation with work and social support as mediators for lagged and reversed relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297742
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2018 Oct; 23(4):553-567
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Constanze Eib
Claudia Bernhard-Oettel
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Constanze Leineweber
Author Affiliation
Norwich Business School, University of East Anglia, and Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2018 Oct; 23(4):553-567
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Awareness
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Health
Self Report
Social Justice
Social Support
Sweden
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Organizational justice perceptions are considered a predictor of health and well-being. To date, empirical evidence about whether organizational justice perceptions predict health or health predicts organizational justice perceptions is mixed. Furthermore, the processes underlying these relationships are largely unknown. In this article, we study whether bidirectional relationships can be explained by 2 different mediation mechanisms. First, based on the allostatic load model, we suggest that the relationships between organizational justice perceptions and different health indicators are mediated through mental preoccupation with work. Second, based on the affective perception and affective reaction assumption, we investigate if the relationships between different health indicators and organizational justice perceptions are mediated by social support at work. Using a large-scale Swedish panel study (N = 3,236), we test the bidirectional mediating relationships between procedural justice perceptions and self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence with a cross-lagged design with 3 waves of data. Significant lagged effects from procedural justice to health were found for models predicting depressive symptoms and sickness absence. Mental preoccupation with work was not found to mediate the longitudinal relationship between procedural justice perceptions and indicators of health. Significant lagged effects from health indicators to procedural justice were found for models involving self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence. Social support mediated the longitudinal relationships between all 3 health indicators and procedural justice. Results are discussed in light of previous studies and implications for theory and practice are outlined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
29504778 View in PubMed
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Human papillomavirus type specific risk of progression and remission during long-term follow-up of equivocal and low-grade HPV-positive cervical smears.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297739
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 08 15; 143(4):851-860
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Olav Karsten Vintermyr
Marie Songstad Andersland
Tone Bjørge
Robert Skar
Ole Erik Iversen
Mari Nygård
Hans Kristian Haugland
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 08 15; 143(4):851-860
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alphapapillomavirus - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - pathology - virology
Disease Progression
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Papanicolaou test
Papillomavirus Infections - diagnosis - pathology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Remission Induction
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology - virology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
The prevalence of clinically relevant HPV types and their specific risk for progression and regression in women with atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were studied in a routine screening population. A 4-year cohort of women (n?=?820) with ASCUS/LSIL and a positive HPV test in triage were followed for 6-9 years. The progression risks for CIN2+/CIN3+ were determined for single (71.2%) and multiple HPV infections (28.8%). The CIN2+ progression risk for all HPV 16, all HPV 35, single HPV 16 and single HPV 35 infections were 65.3% (95% CI: 59.6-71.0), 64.4% (95% CI: 50.4-78.4), 63.8% (95% CI: 56.2-71.4) and 73.7% (95% CI: 53.9-93.5), respectively. Based on CIN2+ progression risks four main groups were defined; the HPV 16 group, the HPV 31/33/35 group, the HPV 18/45/51/52 group and the HPV 39/56/58/59/66/68 group with progression risks of 65.3% (95% CI: 59.6-71.0), 62.1% (95% CI: 54.8-69.4), 52.6 (95% CI: 45.9-59.3) and 39.5 (95% CI: 33.0-46.0), respectively. In multivariate analyses, women in the age group 40-49 years had an increased risk of CIN2+ progression. As for CIN3+, HPV 16 had a higher progression risk than other HPV risk groups (p?
PubMed ID
29569718 View in PubMed
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Diabetes in midlife and risk of cancer in late life: A nationwide Swedish twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297740
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 08 15; 143(4):793-800
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Cuiping Bao
Nancy L Pedersen
Rongrong Yang
Anna Marseglia
Weige Xu
Yaogang Wang
Xiuying Qi
Weili Xu
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 08 15; 143(4):793-800
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Intestinal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between diabetes and cancer risk remains controversial. Hence, we examined whether midlife diabetes is related to the risk of cancer in late-life, and whether genetic and early-life environmental factors play a role in this association. This study included 25,154 twin individuals born in 1958 or earlier from the Swedish Twin Registry. Information on cancer diagnosis in late life (aged?=?65) during 1998-2014, was derived from the National Patient and Cancer Registries. Diabetes was ascertained based on self- or informant-reported history, patient registry and antidiabetic medication use. Midlife diabetes was defined when diabetes was diagnosed before 65 years. Data were analyzed following two strategies: (i) unmatched case-control analysis for all participants using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, and (ii) co-twin control analysis for cancer-discordant twin pairs using conditional logistic regression. Overall, 1,766 (7.0%) had midlife diabetes and 5,293 (21.0%) had cancer in late-life. In multiadjusted GEE models, the odds ratios (95% CIs) of diabetes were 10.55 (2.95-37.67) for pharynx cancer, 5.78 (1.72-19.40) for small intestine cancer, 2.37 (1.14-4.91) for liver cancer and 0.48 (0.35-0.67) for prostate cancer. In people with diabetes, diabetes duration was dose-dependently associated with cancer risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis of 176 prostate cancer-discordant twin pairs, the association between midlife diabetes and prostate cancer in later life became stronger. Midlife diabetes increases the risk of pharynx, small intestine and liver cancers, but reduces prostate cancer risk in late life. Genetic and early-life environmental factors may partially contribute to the diabetes-prostate cancer association.
PubMed ID
29566433 View in PubMed
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Shame predicts revictimization in victims of childhood violence: A prospective study of a general Norwegian population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297737
Source
Psychol Trauma. 2019 Jan; 11(1):43-50
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Helene Flood Aakvaag
Siri Thoresen
Ida Frugård Strøm
Mia Myhre
Ole Kristian Hjemdal
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies.
Source
Psychol Trauma. 2019 Jan; 11(1):43-50
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - psychology
Shame
Violence - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Victims of childhood violence often experience new victimization in adult life. However, risk factors for such revictimization are poorly understood. In this longitudinal study, we investigated whether violence-related shame and guilt were associated with revictimization.
Young adults (age = 17-35) exposed to childhood violence (n = 505) were selected from a (Country) population study of 6,589 persons (Wave 1), and reinterviewed by telephone 12-18 months later (Wave 2). Wave 1 measures included shame, guilt, social support, posttraumatic stress, and binge drinking frequency, as well as childhood violence. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between Wave 1 risk factors and Wave 2 revictimization (physical or sexual violence, or controlling partner behavior).
In total, 31.5% (n = 159) had been revictimized during the period between Wave 1 and 2. Of these, 12.9% (n = 65) had experienced sexual assault, 22% (n = 111) had experienced physical assault and 7.1% (n = 36) had experienced controlling behavior from partner. Both shame and guilt were associated with revictimization, and withstood adjustment for other potentially important risk factors. In mutually adjusted models, guilt was no longer significant, leaving shame and binge drinking frequency as the only factors uniquely associated with revictimization.
Violence-prevention aimed at victims of childhood violence should be a goal for practitioners and policymakers. This could be achieved by targeting shame, both on both on the individual level (clinical settings) and the societal level (changing the stigma of violence). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
29745689 View in PubMed
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Editorial Comment to Prognostic factors of prostate cancer mortality in a Finnish randomized screening trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297738
Source
Int J Urol. 2018 03; 25(3):277
Publication Type
Editorial
Comment
Date
03-2018
Author
Arnout R Alberts
Monique J Roobol
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Int J Urol. 2018 03; 25(3):277
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Comment
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer
Finland
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Prognosis
Prostatic Neoplasms
Notes
CommentOn: Int J Urol. 2018 Mar;25(3):270-276 PMID 29224236
PubMed ID
29569775 View in PubMed
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Oral diabetes medications other than dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors are not associated with bullous pemphigoid: A Finnish nationwide case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297734
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Dec; 79(6):1034-1038.e5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Outi Varpuluoma
Anna-Kaisa Försti
Jari Jokelainen
Miia Turpeinen
Markku Timonen
Kaisa Tasanen
Laura Huilaja
Author Affiliation
PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Dermatology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Dec; 79(6):1034-1038.e5
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - epidemiology
Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors - adverse effects
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - classification
Male
Pemphigoid, Bullous - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP4is) used to treat diabetes have been reported to be associated with an increased risk of bullous pemphigoid (BP). There are no previous reports analyzing the risk of BP in patients who are using other diabetes medications.
To evaluate the association between diabetes medications other than DPP4i and development of BP.
We investigated the prevalence of diabetes among patients with BP and the association between the use of diabetes drugs (excluding DPP4i, metformin, and insulin) and BP by analyzing national Finnish registry data for 3397 patients with BP and 12,941 patients with basal cell carcinoma as controls.
Our results show that 19.6% of patients with BP have type 2 diabetes. Use of none of the investigated medications was associated with an increased risk of BP.
Because this was a registry-based study, it was not possible to verify the accuracy of the diagnoses. The risk of BP in users of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists could not be analyzed.
Our study shows that the investigated diabetes drugs are not associated with an increased risk of BP in a Finnish patient database, indicating they can be safely used in this population. Generalization of these results to other populations will require further study.
Notes
CommentIn: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Dec;79(6):e111-e112 PMID 30420009
CommentIn: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Dec;79(6):e113-e114 PMID 30420010
CommentIn: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Dec;79(6):1026-1027 PMID 30287326
PubMed ID
29803903 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biotic responses buffer warming-induced soil organic carbon loss in Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297735
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 10; 24(10):4946-4959
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-2018
Author
Junyi Liang
Jiangyang Xia
Zheng Shi
Lifen Jiang
Shuang Ma
Xingjie Lu
Marguerite Mauritz
Susan M Natali
Elaine Pegoraro
Christopher Ryan Penton
César Plaza
Verity G Salmon
Gerardo Celis
James R Cole
Konstantinos T Konstantinidis
James M Tiedje
Jizhong Zhou
Edward A G Schuur
Yiqi Luo
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 10; 24(10):4946-4959
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - analysis - metabolism
Climate change
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry - microbiology
Photosynthesis
Plants - metabolism
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Tundra
Abstract
Climate warming can result in both abiotic (e.g., permafrost thaw) and biotic (e.g., microbial functional genes) changes in Arctic tundra. Recent research has incorporated dynamic permafrost thaw in Earth system models (ESMs) and indicates that Arctic tundra could be a significant future carbon (C) source due to the enhanced decomposition of thawed deep soil C. However, warming-induced biotic changes may influence biologically related parameters and the consequent projections in ESMs. How model parameters associated with biotic responses will change under warming and to what extent these changes affect projected C budgets have not been carefully examined. In this study, we synthesized six data sets over 5 years from a soil warming experiment at the Eight Mile Lake, Alaska, into the Terrestrial ECOsystem (TECO) model with a probabilistic inversion approach. The TECO model used multiple soil layers to track dynamics of thawed soil under different treatments. Our results show that warming increased light use efficiency of vegetation photosynthesis but decreased baseline (i.e., environment-corrected) turnover rates of SOC in both the fast and slow pools in comparison with those under control. Moreover, the parameter changes generally amplified over time, suggesting processes of gradual physiological acclimation and functional gene shifts of both plants and microbes. The TECO model predicted that field warming from 2009 to 2013 resulted in cumulative C losses of 224 or 87 g/m2 , respectively, without or with changes in those parameters. Thus, warming-induced parameter changes reduced predicted soil C loss by 61%. Our study suggests that it is critical to incorporate biotic changes in ESMs to improve the model performance in predicting C dynamics in permafrost regions.
PubMed ID
29802797 View in PubMed
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