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25048 records – page 1 of 1253.

Source
Division of Nursing and Maternal and Child Health
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1951
Author
Alaska Department of Health
Source
Division of Nursing and Maternal and Child Health
Date
1951
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Midwives
Maternity nursing
Notes
ALASKA RG961.A55 A52
Based on principles of mother and baby care outlines in the U.S. Children's Bureau 'Manual for teaching midwives' by Anita M. Jones
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Alcohol abuse in rural Alaska: 1980-1981 study, Kotzebue, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289855
Source
State Office of Alcoholism
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1981
Author
Albrecht, C. Earl
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska
Source
State Office of Alcoholism
Date
June 1981
Language
English
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Drinking of alcoholic beverages
Kotzebue
Alaska Natives alcohol use
Alcoholism and crime
Notes
UAA RARE HV5298.K67 A48 1981
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Co-Occurrence of ODD and CD in Preschool Children With Symptoms of ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289854
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Jul; 21(9):741-752
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Bothild Bendiksen
Elisabeth Svensson
Heidi Aase
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Svein Friis
Anne M Myhre
Pål Zeiner
Author Affiliation
1 Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Jul; 21(9):741-752
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
Patterns of co-occurrence between ADHD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and Conduct Disorder (CD) were examined in a sample of non-referred preschool children. ADHD subtypes and sex differences were also explored.
Children aged 3.5 years ( n = 1,048) with high scores on ADHD characteristics were recruited from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and clinically assessed, including a semi-structured psychiatric interview.
In children with ADHD, concurrent ODD was present more often than CD (31% vs. 10%), but having ADHD gave higher increase in the odds of CD than of ODD (ODD: odds ratio [OR] = 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [4.2, 10.8]; CD: OR = 17.6, 95% CI = [5.9, 52.9]). We found a greater proportion of children having the combined ADHD subtype as well as more severe inattentiveness among children with co-occurring CD compared with ODD. Sex differences were minor.
There are important differences in co-occurring patterns of ODD and CD in preschool children with ADHD.
PubMed ID
24994876 View in PubMed
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[Cinnamon rolls are not associated with admission for toxic or alcoholic hepatitis in a Danish liver referral centre].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289853
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Dec 08; 176(50):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-08-2014
Author
Henning Gr Ønbæk
Mette Borre
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk Hepatogastroenterologisk Afdeling V, Aarhus Universitetshospital, N ørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C. henngroe@rm.dk.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Dec 08; 176(50):
Date
Dec-08-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Bread - adverse effects
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury - etiology
Cinnamomum zeylanicum - adverse effects
Coumarins - adverse effects
Denmark
Female
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - etiology
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Abstract
Cinnamon contains cumarin, which may be toxic to the liver. EU-regulations standardardize the amount of cinnamon in pastry including cinnamon rolls. The aim of the study was to investigate if cinnamon intake from pastry was associated with toxic or alcoholic hepatitis.
We registered 58 patients with toxic hepatitis, 38 (66%) women and 20 (34%) men with a median age of 51 (range: 32-80) and 53 (range: 18-78) years, respectively. A total of 22 patients had primarily cholestasis and 36 had hepatitis biochemically. The duration of toxic liver disease from admission to normalization of liver enzymes was similar in the two groups (3.5 ± 3.5 vs 3.6 ± 3.5 months). Toxic hepatitis was most often caused by drugs e.g. NSAID (n = 15; 26%), antibiotics (n = 9; 16%), alternative medicine (n = 7; 12%) and Antabuse (n = 5; 9%). We registered eight patients admitted with severe alcoholic hepatitis, five men and three women, median age of 60 (range: 34-67) years. Alcoholic hepatitis was associated with high alcohol intake. None of the patients with toxic or alcoholic hepatitis reported of excessive intake of cinnamon rolls and there was no evidence of cinnamon added to alcohol of alternative medicine products.
Intake of cinnamon from cinnamon rolls is not associated with admission for toxic or alcoholic hepatitis. However, for the diagnosis of toxic liver diseases including alcohol it is very important to have patient information regarding any new drugs, alternative medicine and alcohol intake. Further, other causes of liver diseases should be excluded.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25498179 View in PubMed
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[Nutrition value of national milk products with the addition of wild berries and wild food plants of Yakutia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289852
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2015
Author
U M Lebedeva
A F Abramov
K M Stepanov
V T Vasilyeva
A A Efimova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cultured Milk Products - analysis
Eating
Female
Food analysis
Fruit
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Siberia
Abstract
Results of an assessment of the actual food of the population in various medicoeconomic zones of the republic (industrial, agricultural, Arctic) by method of the frequency analysis of food consumption are presented in the article. The analysis of control of compliance of quality and safety of foodstuff in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), according to requirements of the legislation of the Russian Federation, acts of the Customs union has been made. Decreased consumption of such foodstuff as milk, fish and meat products including products from local food staples and national dishes has been established. The data obtained are medic-biological justification for search of ways of optimization of population nutrition, creation of specialized products with a functional purpose and for the prevention of the states and diseases connected with nutrition violation. They also define innovative development of the republic in questions of biotechnologies of the production of specialized foods for various groups of the population. Results of chemical composition research of the most used wild-growing food plants of Yakutia are given. The questions connected with the nutrition and biological value of the dairy products of a functional purpose with use of wild-growing food herbs and berries of Yakutia are discussed.
PubMed ID
29378108 View in PubMed
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Assessing Adolescent Anxiety in General Psychiatric Care: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Swedish Self-Report and Parent Versions of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289850
Source
Assessment. 2016 Dec; 23(6):744-757
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Susanne Olofsdotter
Karin Sonnby
Sofia Vadlin
Tomas Furmark
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden susanne.olofsdotter@ltv.se.
Source
Assessment. 2016 Dec; 23(6):744-757
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - methods
Anxiety - diagnosis
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Male
Parents - psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sweden
Abstract
This study examined the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the Swedish translations of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, self- and parent report versions, in a sample of 104 adolescents presenting at two general psychiatric outpatient units. Results showed high informant agreement and good internal reliability and concurrent and discriminant validity for both versions and demonstrated that this scale can distinguish between adolescents with and without an anxiety disorder in a non-anxiety-specific clinical setting. The relative clinical utility of different cutoff scores was compared by looking at the extent to which dichotomized questionnaire results altered the pretest probability of the presence of a diagnosis as defined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. Optimized for screening and diagnostic purposes in Sweden, cutoff scores obtained in the current study outperformed a previously identified cutoff score derived from an Australian community sample. The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale is a useful clinical instrument for the assessment of anxiety in adolescents.
PubMed ID
25934162 View in PubMed
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Engaging Elements of Cancer-Related Digital Stories in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289851
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
09-2016
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura Revels
Nancy E Schoenberg
Anne Lanier
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Community Health Aide Program, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. mcueva@anthc.org.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Communication
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The tradition of storytelling is an integral part of Alaska Native cultures that continues to be a way of passing on knowledge. Using a story-based approach to share cancer education is grounded in Alaska Native traditions and people's experiences and has the potential to positively impact cancer knowledge, understandings, and wellness choices. Community health workers (CHWs) in Alaska created a personal digital story as part of a 5-day, in-person cancer education course. To identify engaging elements of digital stories among Alaska Native people, one focus group was held in each of three different Alaska communities with a total of 29 adult participants. After viewing CHWs' digital stories created during CHW cancer education courses, focus group participants commented verbally and in writing about cultural relevance, engaging elements, information learned, and intent to change health behavior. Digital stories were described by Alaska focus group participants as being culturally respectful, informational, inspiring, and motivational. Viewers shared that they liked digital stories because they were short (only 2-3 min); nondirective and not preachy; emotional, told as a personal story and not just facts and figures; and relevant, using photos that showed Alaskan places and people.
Notes
Cites: Menopause Int. 2010 Jun;16(2):51-5 PMID 20729493
Cites: J Cancer Surviv. 2008 Mar;2(1):33-44 PMID 18648985
Cites: Educ Prim Care. 2009 Nov;20(6):441-4 PMID 20132639
Cites: Med Teach. 2008;30(8):774-7 PMID 18946821
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23984267
Cites: Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):61-9, 83 PMID 11710084
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2004;25:439-55 PMID 15015929
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2003 Nov-Dec;27 Suppl 3:S227-32 PMID 14672383
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):6-11 PMID 11776018
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):617-23 PMID 23099660
PubMed ID
25865400 View in PubMed
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Factors facilitating patient satisfaction among women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue: A relational perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289849
Source
Health (London). 2016 05; 20(3):308-26
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2016
Author
Olaug S Lian
Anne Helen Hansen
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Norway olaug.lian@uit.no.
Source
Health (London). 2016 05; 20(3):308-26
Date
05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Continuity of Patient Care
Fatigue - psychology - therapy
Female
General practitioners
Humans
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Referral and Consultation
Women's health
Abstract
Bodily conditions that are difficult to identify, explain and treat with the aid of medical knowledge and technology appear to be particularly challenging to medical encounters. Patients are often dissatisfied with the help they receive, and they often experience that their medical needs are not met. To explore factors facilitating patient satisfaction among patients with a medically unexplained condition, we ask: what is the importance of individual versus relational factors in facilitating patient satisfaction in clinical encounters between general practitioners (GPs) and women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue? We approach this question through a statistical analysis of survey data collected from a net sample of 431 women recruited through a patient organisation for people suffering from myalgic encephalomyelitis in 2013. Participants were asked about their experiences with general practitioners in the Norwegian national health system in two different phases: shortly after illness onset, and current regular general practitioner last 12?months. The questions evolved around themes concerning shared understanding and decision making, being taken seriously, being paid due respect and being treated as an equal partner. Through descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses, we explored how their experiences were related to individual and relational factors, respectively. Free-text comments from the questionnaires were used while interpreting the results. The analysis illuminates that relational aspects in medical encounters between GPs and ME patients, especially continuity, congruence in doctor-patient views and being seen by a specialist, are important catalysts of patient satisfaction. The probability of being satisfied with the initial investigation was more than six times higher in women who were referred to specialists, compared to those who were not. We conclude that continuity of care and experiences of being in a partnership that operates on a common ground - a shared understanding of the patient's illness - foster patient satisfaction among women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue.
PubMed ID
25979224 View in PubMed
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Is There a Scale-up Penalty? Testing Behavioral Change in the Scaling up of Parent Management Training in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289847
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2017 Mar; 44(2):203-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Truls Tommeraas
Terje Ogden
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Child Behavior Development, P.O. Box 7053, Majorstuen, 0306, Oslo, Norway. trulstom@atferdssenteret.no.
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2017 Mar; 44(2):203-216
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavior Therapy - education - methods
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - therapy
Child, Preschool
Evidence-Based Practice - methods
Female
Humans
Infant
Information Dissemination - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study, the scaling up of Parent Management Training, Oregon Model (PMTO) in Norway was examined by investigating how large-scale dissemination affected the composition of the target group and the service providers by comparing child behavioral outcomes in the effectiveness and dissemination phases of implementation. Despite the larger heterogeneity of the service providers and the intake characteristics of the target group, which are contrary to the expectations that were derived from the literature, no attenuation of program effects was detected when scaling up PMTO. In Norway, a long-term-funded centralized center, combined with an active implementation strategy, seems to have affected the quality of PMTO delivered system-wide in services for children with behavior problems.
Notes
Cites: Am Psychol. 2010 Feb-Mar;65(2):73-84 PMID 20141263
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 May;87(5):364-7 PMID 8517178
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2008 Aug;76(4):607-21 PMID 18665689
Cites: Prev Sci. 2011 Sep;12(3):235-46 PMID 21671090
Cites: J Sch Psychol. 2010 Feb;48(1):85-112 PMID 20006989
Cites: Prev Sci. 2004 Mar;5(1):47-53 PMID 15058912
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Dec;8(4):247-54 PMID 10654117
Cites: Perspect Psychol Sci. 2013 Nov;8(6):682-94 PMID 24443650
Cites: Prev Sci. 2003 Sep;4(3):137-53 PMID 12940466
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2013 Mar;51(3):113-21 PMID 23318242
Cites: Prev Sci. 2010 Jun;11(2):115-25 PMID 19936922
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2013 Dec;81(6):1010-20 PMID 23895086
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2001 Jan;20(1 Suppl):63-70 PMID 11146262
PubMed ID
26715496 View in PubMed
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Survival and its predictors from age 75 to 85 in men and women belonging to cohorts with marked survival differences to age 75: a comparative study in three Nordic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289848
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jun; 28(3):541-50
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
E Heikkinen
M Kauppinen
M Schroll
B Steen
P Era
Author Affiliation
University of Jyvaskyla, Gerontology Research Center, Jyvaskyla, Finland. eino.heikkinen@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jun; 28(3):541-50
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness
Prospective Studies
Survival
Sweden
Abstract
While predictors of survival in older people have been examined in depth in a large number of studies, a literature search revealed no cross-national comparative prospective cohort studies on this issue. This study investigated survival and its predictors from age 75 to 85 among three local Nordic populations using survival data on national cohorts as background information.
The data were derived from national registers and from samples of 75-year old living in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. The subjects were invited to take part in interviews and examinations focusing on different domains of health, functional capacity, and physical and social activities.
The proportion of survivors to age 75 was markedly smaller among the Finnish men and women than Danish or Swedish subjects. In the local population no marked differences in survival from age 75 to 85 were observed between the groups of men, while women survived longer than men and longer in Göteborg than in Glostrup or Jyväskylä. Univariate models revealed 12 predictors of survival. In the multivariate models, the significant predictors among men related to physical fitness, whereas among women they pertained to social activities and morbidity.
Despite great differences in the proportions of survivors to age 75, and excepting the survival advantage of women, only minor differences were present in the subjects' further survival to age 85. In the univariate analyses, many of the factors predictive of survival from age 75 to 85 were the same in the examined populations, whereas in the multivariate analyses differences between the sexes emerged.
PubMed ID
26254793 View in PubMed
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Some aspects of the structure and organization of child nutrition in a number of regions Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289845
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(6):95-102
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
T V Mazhaeva
O V Chugunova
D V Grashchenkov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(6):95-102
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Russia
Abstract
This research aims to assess catering arrangements and dietary patterns of children at preschool educational institution and at home. The article analyses catering arrange­ments for pre-school children (3-7-year-old) from Ekaterinburg, Nizhny Tagil, Kamensk-Uralsky, Vladikavkaz and Krasnoyarsk. Based on menu production records provided by preschool educational institution, and family nutrition questionnaires we have examined their compliance with the nutritional physiological standards. The summarized data on menu production records from preschool educational institutions showed whether they met food basket requirements (net weight), as well as nutritional value requirements (proteins, fats, carbohydrates, calories content). The assessment was carried out in Ekaterinburg, Nizhny Tagil and Krasnoyarsk using Public catering calculations software (version 5) and a proprietary database of childreris food formulae. Childrens food basket assess­ment in Ekaterinburg and Kamensk-Uralsky revealed underconsumptionof vegetables (17.9-38% decrease), milk (52.7-62% decrease), curd (40.2-45.3% decrease). We have also observed decreased consumption of fruits, including dried fruit, by 31.8%, as well as cereals and legumes by 43% in Kamensk-Uralsky. Macronutrient analysis has shown underconsumption of total carbohydrates (by 19%) and animal proteins. The assessment of children nutrition at home has been carried out using NUTRITEST-IP diagnostic sys­tem in Nizhny Tagil, Kamensk-Uralsky, Vladikavkaz and Krasnoyarsk. The results showed overconsumption of most foods except vegetables. Excessive intake of fats and sugars (3.6 and 3.5 fold higher, respectively) accounted for higher than normal energy consump­tion by children at home. The evaluation has also revealed a significant difference in the consumption of saturated fats, mono - and disaccharides, food fibers and vitamin C by the children from the locations included in the study. The excessive intake of simple carbohy­drates was typical for family diets and excessive fat intake was characteristic for child diet in preschool educational institution.
PubMed ID
29377657 View in PubMed
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Non-specific effects of BCG vaccination on morbidity among children in Greenland: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289846
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 12 01; 45(6):2122-2130
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2016
Author
S Haahr
S W Michelsen
M Andersson
K Bjorn-Mortensen
B Soborg
J Wohlfahrt
M Melbye
A Koch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 12 01; 45(6):2122-2130
Date
12-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
BCG Vaccine - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Registries
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The potential non-specific effects of BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccination, with reported reduction of infectious disease morbidity among vaccinated children, in addition to the protective effect against tuberculosis (TB), are highly debated. In Greenland, BCG vaccination was introduced in 1955, but temporarily discontinued from 1991 to 1996 due to nationwide policy changes. Using the transient vaccination stop, we aimed to investigate possible non-specific effects of BCG vaccination by measuring nation-wide hospitalization rates due to infectious diseases other than TB among vaccinated and unvaccinated children.
A retrospective cohort study including all children born in Greenland aged 3 months to 3 years from 1989 to 2004. A personal identification number assigned at birth allowed for follow-up through national registers. Information on hospitalization due to infectious diseases was obtained from the Greenlandic inpatient register using ICD-8 and ICD-10 codes. Participants with notified TB were censored. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Poisson regression.
Overall, 19 363 children, hereof 66% BCG-vaccinated, were followed for 44 065 person-years and had 2069 hospitalizations due to infectious diseases. IRRs of hospitalization in BCG-vaccinated as compared with BCG-unvaccinated children were 1.07 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.20] for infectious diseases overall, and specifically 1.10 (95% CI 0.98-1.24) for respiratory tract infections. Among BCG-vaccinated children aged 3 to 11 months, the IRR of hospitalization due to infectious diseases was 1.00 (95% CI 0.84-1.19) as compared with BCG-unvaccinated children.
Our results do not support the hypothesis that neonatal BCG vaccination reduces morbidity in children caused by infectious diseases other than TB.
Notes
CommentIn: Int J Epidemiol. 2016 Dec 1;45(6):2131-2133 PMID 27856606
PubMed ID
28338723 View in PubMed
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[The association of genetic polymorphisms with non-communicable disease among Arctic population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289843
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(5):5-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2016
Author
A K Baturin
E Yu Sorokina
A V Pogozheva
V A Tutelyan
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(5):5-12
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
The review analyzed genetic polymorphisms contribute to the development of non-communicable diseases among the inhabitants of the Arctic. It is known that the area belongs to the arctic areas of discomfort for living and employment rights. Ecological features of the Far North have contributed to the adaptation of the indigenous population to environmental conditions, which manifested itself in particular in the power features that provide a low prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Active development of the Arctic zone and the associated lifestyle changes in the population, including the nature of power, caused a change in the prevalence and trends of non-communicable diseases, which has its own characteristics in comparison with the ethnic groups living in more southern latitudes. These features, as follows from the results of a number of studies to be associated, including the presence of genetic polymorphisms characteristic of the population of the Arctic zone.
PubMed ID
29381296 View in PubMed
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[Nutrition value of wild-growing fruits from mountain Dagestan and its safety after fast freezing and cold storage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289844
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(4):76-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
B M Guseynova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(4):76-81
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Dagestan
Food analysis
Food Preservation
Food Safety
Freezing
Fruit - chemistry
Nutritive Value
Abstract
Results of research of mineral composition, content of vitamin C and P, titrable acids, pectinaceous and phenol substances in fresh, fast-frozen (t=-30 °C), and also stored within 3 and 9 months (t=-18 °C) fruits of wild-growing blackberry, cornel, medlar and sea-buckthorn are presented in article. Determination of mineral composition was carried out by flame atomic absorption photometry, vitamin C and pectinaceous substances -by titirimetric methods, phenolic substances and vitamin P - by colorimetric methods. Vitamin C content was minimal in fresh fruits of cornel (6.9±0.3 mg%), amounted to 21.7-32.0 mg% in the fruits of blackberries and medlar and reached 180.1±7.2 mg% in the fruit of sea-buckthorn. Vitamin P concentration ranged from 34.9 (sea-buckthorn) to 180.0 mg% (cornel). Berries of a cornel contained also the greatest number of titrable acids (33.2±1.3 g/dm3), phenolic compounds (243.0±4.8 mg%) and pectinaceous substances (2.91±0.08%). The most significant content of potassium (521±15.6 mg%), calcium (133.2±5.2 mg%), magnesium (62.4±2.5 mg%) and iron (2.81±0.05 mg%) was revealed in medlar fruits. Consumption of 100 g of the studied fruits provides daily requirements of a human body, depending on a species of wild plants: in calcium -for 2-13.3%, potassium - for 7.0-20.8%, magnesium - for 8.1-15.6%, iron - for 5.9-19.2% and in vitamin C - from 5.8-24.6 to 145.7% in the case of sea buckthorn. The applied processing method of conservation - fast freezing (t=-30 °?) of fruits and their long storage (t=-18 °?) is the effective way ensuring high safety of nutrients in them. In the studied berries after 9-months cold storage the safety of vitamin C varied ranging from 55.7 (blackberry) to 76.1% (cornel), and vitamin P - from 81.9 (sea-buckthorn) to 92.8% (cornel). Stability of titrable acids, except for medlar fruits, varied from 84.2% (blackberry) to 94.0% (sea-buckthorn). The safety of phenolic and pectinaceous compounds by the end of 9 months of storage, has averaged 90.6 and 95.6% respectively in comparison with their initial quantity in fresh fruits. The mineral composition was the stablest. After completion of experiment the safety of mineral substances in fruits of wild plants fluctuated from 94.6 to 98.5%. Distinctions in change of biochemical complexes of berries of blackberry, cornel, medlar and sea-buckthorn at fast freezing (t=-30 °?) and storage (t=-18 °?), apparently, are caused by specific features, content of free and bound water, thickness of cellular walls, durability of a thin skin of fruits, as well as by concentration of the components that inhibit the destructive processes occurring at the cellular and molecular level.
PubMed ID
29381286 View in PubMed
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Data Resource Profile: The Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey-Higher School of Economics (RLMS-HSE) Phase II: Monitoring the Economic and Health Situation in Russia, 1994-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289841
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 04; 45(2):395-401
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
04-2016
Author
Polina Kozyreva
Mikhail Kosolapov
Barry M Popkin
Author Affiliation
Center for Longitudinal Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics and Institute of Sociology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 04; 45(2):395-401
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Databases as Topic
Female
Health status
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval - methods
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multilevel Analysis
Russia
Social Class
Surveys and Questionnaires
Notes
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Cites: Stud Fam Plann. 1997 Mar;28(1):14-23 PMID 9097382
PubMed ID
26874929 View in PubMed
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[The association between diet and the probability of colorectal cancer among the population of Perm krai: epidemiological study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289842
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(5):60-7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
I V Feldblyum
M Kh Alyeva
N I Markovich
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(5):60-7
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Risk factors
Russia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among all malignant tumors both in the world and in Russia. The purpose of the research was to study the association between diet and the probability of CRC in Perm Krai. The epidemiological analytical case-control study was performed. The questionnaire survey included 191 histologically proved colorectal cancer cases and 200 healthy individuals with excluded CRC by the results of colonoscopy. The surveyed groups were spread evenly by sex, age, ethnicity, place of residence and smoking (p>0.05). The odds to determine the following factors were higher in case group: diet including fried foods (OR=2.45, 95% CI: 1.58-3.80, p
PubMed ID
29381303 View in PubMed
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Associations of alcohol use disorders with esophageal and gastric cancers: a population-based study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289840
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2017 03; 26(2):119-124
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
Jianguang Ji
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
aCenter for Primary Health Care Research, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Region Skåne, Sweden bSchool of Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2017 03; 26(2):119-124
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Esophageal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Stomach Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, but little is known about whether alcohol consumption is associated with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cancer, which we attempt to clarify in this study. Individuals with alcohol use disorders were identified from the nation-wide Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and Outpatient Register, the Crime Register, and the Prescription Drug Register, and they were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry to calculate standardized incidence ratios of esophageal and gastric cancers using those without alcohol use disorders (AUDs) as a reference. A total of 14?518 and 73?504 patients were diagnosed with esophageal and gastric cancers, separately, during the study period. The risk of esophageal cancer was significantly increased, with a standardized incidence ratio of 2.24 (95% confidence interval 2.08-2.41) among individuals with AUDs. Both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus were increased (2.89 for squamous cell carcinoma and 1.20 for adenocarcinoma). The incidence of gastric cancer was significantly decreased and the decrease was even more prominant for corpus cancer compared with cardia cancer (0.57 vs. 0.82). In this retrospective cohort study, we found that AUDs were associated with an increased risk of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, whereas individuals with AUDs had a lower risk of gastric cancer, especially for corpus cancer, which may be related to the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the underlying mechanisms need to be explored in future studies.
PubMed ID
26886238 View in PubMed
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Substance use pattern, self-control and social network are associated with crime in a substance-using population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289838
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2017 03; 36(2):245-252
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
03-2017
Author
Ingeborg Skjaervø
Svetlana Skurtveit
Thomas Clausen
Anne Bukten
Author Affiliation
SERAF, Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2017 03; 36(2):245-252
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Protective factors
Risk factors
Self-Control
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
Crime rates are high in substance-using populations; therefore, investigation of factors associated with crime in these populations is highly relevant. We describe crime prevalence and associations between crime, pattern of substance use and psychosocial factors, such as self-control and social network.
This is a cross-sectional study including substance users (n?=?549; mean age 34?years; 27% women) entering treatment at 21 treatment centres across Norway (December 2012 to April 2015). Data on demographics, substance use, psychosocial variables and crime in the 6?months prior to treatment were obtained through interviews. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated through logistic regression.
Sixty-four percent of participants had committed crime in the 6?months prior to treatment. Of these, 93% committed income-generating crime. Several factors were associated with increased likelihood of having committed crime: use of stimulants (aOR?=?1.82, 95% CI 1.04-3.17), use of a higher number of different substances (aOR?=?1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.31) and spending most of their time with family or friends using addictive substances (aOR?=?2.38, 95% CI 1.10-5.16 and aOR?=?2.22, 95% CI 1.32-3.73). Protective factors associated with decreased likelihood of committing crime were being older (aOR?=?0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.97) and having higher self-control (aOR?=?0.94, 95% CI 0.91-0.97).
Stimulant use, higher number of different substances used, lower self-control, primarily a substance-using social network and being younger were associated with crime in this substance-using population. Treatment clinics should consider these risk factors for crime, and suitable interventions should be implemented and evaluated. [Skjaervø I, Skurtveit S, Clausen T, Bukten A. Substance use pattern, self-control and social network are associated with crime in a substance-using population. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:245-252].
PubMed ID
27147068 View in PubMed
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Awareness of human papillomavirus after introduction of HPV vaccination: a large population-based survey of Scandinavian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289839
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2017 03; 26(2):170-178
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
Louise T Thomsen
Mari Nygård
Signe Stensen
Bo Terning Hansen
Lisen Arnheim Dahlström
Kai-Li Liaw
Christian Munk
Susanne K Kjaer
Author Affiliation
aUnit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center bDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark cDepartment of Research, The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway dDepartment of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden eMerck & Co. Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2017 03; 26(2):170-178
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - therapeutic use
Population Surveillance - methods
Random Allocation
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination - methods
Abstract
Using a large, population-based survey, we assessed the levels and correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) awareness among Scandinavian women after introduction of HPV vaccination. In 2011-2012, a random sample of women aged between 18 and 45 years from Denmark, Sweden and Norway received a questionnaire on lifestyle, health and HPV awareness. We included 47?895 women (response rate 60.6%) in our study. Country-specific and age-specific proportions of women who had heard of HPV in 2011-2012 (postvaccination survey) were compared with corresponding proportions in an identical survey from 2004-2005 (prevaccination survey, n=54?079, response rate 71.3%). Correlates of HPV awareness in the postvaccination survey were assessed by logistic regression. In all countries and age groups, awareness of HPV increased from the prevaccination to the postvaccination survey. In the postvaccination survey, HPV awareness was higher in Denmark (75.8%) and Sweden (74.8%) compared with Norway (62.4%), with greatest discrepancy among women aged between 18 and 19 years (Denmark: 74.9%, Sweden: 70.4%, Norway: 39.6%). Variables associated with low HPV awareness included the following: low education [=12 vs. >16 years of schooling: odds ratio (OR)=0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42-0.48], being a virgin (vs. nonvirgins: OR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.66-0.83), never having used condoms (vs. ever: OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.56-0.67), nonuse of contraception at first intercourse (vs. use: OR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.79-0.88) and daily smoking (vs. never: OR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.80-0.92). HPV awareness in Scandinavia has increased since the introduction of HPV vaccination. However, 24-38% of Scandinavian women still have never heard of HPV. Future information efforts should target groups with low HPV awareness.
PubMed ID
27010329 View in PubMed
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Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Norway: a nationwide study, 1995-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289837
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2016 06; 20(6):786-92
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-2016
Author
M Jensenius
B A Winje
B Blomberg
A T Mengshoel
B von der Lippe
R Hannula
J N Bruun
P K Knudsen
J O Rønning
E Heldal
A M Dyrhol-Riise
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2016 06; 20(6):786-92
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Emigrants and Immigrants
Epidemics
Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotyping Techniques
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Linezolid - therapeutic use
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant - drug therapy - epidemiology
USSR - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
The management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is strictly regulated in Norway. However, nationwide studies of the epidemic are lacking.
To describe the MDR-TB epidemic in Norway over two decades.
Retrospective analysis of data on MDR-TB cases in Norway, 1995-2014, obtained from the national registry, patient records and the reference laboratory, with genotyping and cluster analysis data. Data for non-MDR-TB cases were collected from the national registry.
Of 4427 TB cases, 89 (2.0%) had MDR-TB, 7% of whom had extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) and 24% pre-XDR-TB. Of the 89 MDR-TB cases, 96% were immigrants, mainly from the Horn of Africa or the former Soviet Union (FSU); 37% had smear-positive TB; and 4% were human immunodeficiency virus co-infected. Of the 19% infected in Norway, the majority belonged to a Delhi/Central Asian lineage cluster in a local Somali community. Among the MDR-TB cases, smear-positive TB and FSU origin were independent risk factors for XDR/pre-XDR-TB. Treatment was successful in 66%; 17% were lost to follow-up, with illicit drug use and adolescence being independent risk factors. Forty-four per cent of patients treated with linezolid discontinued treatment due to adverse effects.
MDR-TB is rare in Norway and is predominantly seen in immigrants from the Horn of Africa and FSU. Domestic transmission outside immigrant populations is minimal.
PubMed ID
27155182 View in PubMed
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