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26157 records – page 1 of 1308.

Source
Alaska's Health. Special Edition. 1944. p.3-15.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1944
Source
Alaska's Health. Special Edition. 1944. p.3-15.
Date
1944
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Public Health
Tuberculosis
Housing
Sanitation
Alaska Health Commission
Less detail

Walter W. Council, PH.D., M.D.: 1882-1943, Alaska Commissioner of Health, 1933-1943.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294040
Source
Alaska's Health. December 1943; 1(7):[2]
Publication Type
Article
Date
1943
Source
Alaska's Health. December 1943; 1(7):[2]
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Notes
This editorial appeared in The Alaska Daily Empire, November 16, 1943.
Less detail
Source
Alaska's Health. August 1943. 1(3):[7].
Publication Type
Article
Date
1943
Source
Alaska's Health. August 1943. 1(3):[7].
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
paralytic shellfish poisoning
Less detail

Occurrence and genotypic analysis of Trichinella species in Alaska marine-associated mammals of the Bering and Chukchi seas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294053
Source
Veterinary Parasitology. 2014 Feb 24;200(1-2):153-64. doi: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2013.11.015. Epub 2013 Nov 26.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Seymour J
Horstmann-Dehn L
Rosa C
Lopez JA
Source
Veterinary Parasitology. 2014 Feb 24;200(1-2):153-64. doi: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2013.11.015. Epub 2013 Nov 26.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Aquatic Organisms
Epidemiology
Parasitology
Caniformia
Female
Foxes
Genotype
Incidence
Male
Oceans and Seas
Prevalence
Trichinella
Genetics
Physiology
Trichinellosis
Ursidae
Abstract
The zoonotic parasite Trichinella is the causative agent of trichinellosis outbreaks in the circumpolar Arctic. Subsistence communities are particularly prone to trichinellosis due to traditional meat preparation methods and regional presence of a freeze-tolerant Trichinella species (Trichinella nativa). This study is the first application of a validated artificial digestion method in determining incidence of Trichinella sp. in Alaskan mammals. Infection incidence in pinniped species (Erignathus barbatus, Eumetopias jubatus, Odobenus rosmarus divergens, and Pusa hispida) was low, with only 1/57 ringed seals infected. Polymerase Chain Reaction assays indicate T. nativa as the only species present in northern Alaska. Analysis of an archived polar bear (Ursus maritimus) muscle sample shows freeze-tolerance and longevity for T. nativa to -20°C for 10 years and short-term freeze resistance to -80°C when morphology was used to determine presence of live larvae. However, larval motility suggests 0% survival. An approach that combines artificial digestion with PCR based species identification has excellent potential for Trichinella sp. detection and identification of archived tissues. Overall, Trichinella in Alaskan mammals, particularly marine mammals of subsistence importance, appears to be a minor problem. These modern diagnostic techniques provide accurate insight into the presence of Trichinella in the Alaskan marine environment.
PubMed ID
24373515 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Helminth fauna and muscle phase of trichinellosis in polar bears from Wrangel Island].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294052
Source
Wiadomosci Parazytologiczne. 1971;17(5):451-63.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971

Integrating coalescent species delimitation with analysis of host specificity reveals extensive cryptic diversity despite minimal mitochondrial divergence in the malaria parasite genus Leucocytozoon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294051
Source
BMC Evolutionary Biology. 2018 Aug 30;18(1):128. doi: 10.1186/s12862-018-1242-x.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
Author
Galen SC
Nunes R
Sweet PR
Perkins SL
Source
BMC Evolutionary Biology. 2018 Aug 30;18(1):128. doi: 10.1186/s12862-018-1242-x.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Cytochromes b
Genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial
Genetic Loci
Genetic Variation
Haemosporida
Haplotypes
Host Specificity
Malaria
Parasitology
Mitochondria
Parasites
Phylogeny
Songbirds
Species Specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Coalescent methods that use multi-locus sequence data are powerful tools for identifying putatively reproductively isolated lineages, though this approach has rarely been used for the study of microbial groups that are likely to harbor many unrecognized species. Among microbial symbionts, integrating genetic species delimitation methods with trait data that could indicate reproductive isolation, such as host specificity data, has rarely been used despite its potential to inform species limits. Here we test the ability of an integrative approach combining genetic and host specificity data to delimit species within the avian malaria parasite genus Leucocytozoon in central Alaska. RESULTS: We sequenced seven nuclear loci for 69 Leucocytozoon samples and used multiple species delimitation methods (GMYC and BPP models), tested for differences in host infection patterns among putative species based on 406 individual infections, and characterized parasite morphology. We found that cryptic morphology has masked a highly diverse Leucocytozoon assemblage, with most species delimitation methods recovering support for at least 21 separate species that occur sympatrically and have divergent host infection patterns. Reproductive isolation among putative species appears to have evolved despite low mtDNA divergence, and in one instance two Leucocytozoon cytb haplotypes that differed by a single base pair (~?0.2% divergence) were supported as separate species. However, there was no consistent association between mtDNA divergence and species limits. Among cytb haplotypes that differed by one to three base pairs we observed idiosyncratic patterns of nuclear and ecological divergence, with cytb haplotype pairs found to be either conspecific, reproductively isolated with no divergence in host specificity, or reproductively isolated with divergent patterns of host specialization. CONCLUSION: Integrating multi-locus genetic species delimitation methods and non-traditional ecological data types such as host specificity provide a novel view of the diversity of avian malaria parasites that has been missed previously using morphology and mtDNA barcodes. Species delimitation methods show that Leucocytozoon is highly species-rich in Alaska, and the genus is likely to harbor extraordinary species-level diversity worldwide. Integrating genetic and ecological data will be an important approach for understanding the diversity and evolutionary history of microbial symbionts moving forward.
PubMed ID
30165810 View in PubMed
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Evidence for intercontinental parasite exchange through molecular detection and characterization of haematozoa in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled throughout the North Pacific Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294050
Source
International Journal of Parasitology. Parasites and Wildlife. 2014 Dec 30;4(1):11-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2014.12.004. eCollection 2015 Apr.
Date
2014
Author
Ramey AM
Schmutz JA
Reed JA
Fujita G
Scotton BD
Casler B
Fleskes JP
Konishi K
Uchida K
Yabsley MJ
Source
International Journal of Parasitology. Parasites and Wildlife. 2014 Dec 30;4(1):11-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2014.12.004. eCollection 2015 Apr.
Date
2014
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Keywords
Anas acuta
Haematozoa
Haemoproteus
Leucocytozoon
Northern pintail
Pacific Basin
Plasmodium
PubMed ID
25830100 View in PubMed
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First evidence and predictions of Plasmodium transmission in Alaskan bird populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294049
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e44729. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044729. Epub 2012 Sep 19.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loiseau C
Harrigan RJ
Cornel AJ
Guers SL
Dodge M
Marzec T
Carlson JS
Seppi B
Sehgal RN
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e44729. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044729. Epub 2012 Sep 19.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Birds
Malaria
Transmission
Plasmodium
Pathogenicity
Abstract
The unprecedented rate of change in the Arctic climate is expected to have major impacts on the emergence of infectious diseases and host susceptibility to these diseases. It is predicted that malaria parasites will spread to both higher altitudes and latitudes with global warming. Here we show for the first time that avian Plasmodium transmission occurs in the North American Arctic. Over a latitudinal gradient in Alaska, from 61°N to 67°N, we collected blood samples of resident and migratory bird species. We found both residents and hatch year birds infected with Plasmodium as far north as 64°N, providing clear evidence that malaria transmission occurs in these climates. Based on our empirical data, we make the first projections of the habitat suitability for Plasmodium under a future-warming scenario in Alaska. These findings raise new concerns about the spread of malaria to naïve host populations.
PubMed ID
23028595 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancement into the Arctic region for bioactive sponge secondary metabolites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294048
Source
Marine Drugs. 2011;9(11):2423-37. doi: 10.3390/md9112423. Epub 2011 Nov 21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Abbas S
Kelly M
Bowling J
Sims J
Waters A
Hamann M
Source
Marine Drugs. 2011;9(11):2423-37. doi: 10.3390/md9112423. Epub 2011 Nov 21.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biological Products
Isolation & purification
Pharmacology
Drug Design
Drug Discovery
Methods
Humans
Porifera
Classification
Metabolism
Abstract
Porifera have long been a reservoir for the discovery of bioactive compounds and drug discovery. Most research in the area has focused on sponges from tropical and temperate waters, but more recently the focus has shifted to the less accessible colder waters of the Antarctic and, to a lesser extent, the Arctic. The Antarctic region in particular has been a more popular location for natural products discovery and has provided promising candidates for drug development. This article reviews groups of bioactive compounds that have been isolated and reported from the southern reaches of the Arctic Circle, surveys the known sponge diversity present in the Arctic waters, and details a recent sponge collection by our group in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The collection has yielded previously undescribed sponge species along with primary activity against opportunistic infectious diseases, malaria, and HCV. The discovery of new sponge species and bioactive crude extracts gives optimism for the isolation of new bioactive compounds from a relatively unexplored source.
PubMed ID
22163194 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection of Francisella tularensis in Alaskan mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and assessment of a laboratory model for transmission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294047
Source
Journal of Medical Entomology. 2010 Jul;47(4):639-48.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010

Francisella genes required for replication in mosquito cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294046
Source
Journal of Medical Entomology. 2008 Nov;45(6):1108-16.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Read A
Vogl SJ
Hueffer K
Gallagher LA
Happ GM
Source
Journal of Medical Entomology. 2008 Nov;45(6):1108-16.
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anopheles
Microbiology
Bacterial Proteins
Genetics
Cell Line
Cell Proliferation
Francisella
Pathogenicity
Genomic Islands
Virulence Factors
Abstract
Francisella tularensis, a potential bioterrorism agent, is transmitted by arthropod vectors and causes tularemia in many mammals, including humans. Francisella novicida causes disease with similar pathology in mice. We show that F. novicida invades hemocyte-like cells of the SualB cell line derived from Anopheles gambiae and replicates vigorously within these cells. We used transposon knockouts of single genes of F. novicida to show that bacterial growth within these insect cells is dependent on virulence factors encoded in a bacterial pathogenicity island that has been linked to replication in mammalian macrophages. The virulence factors MglA, IglA, IglB, IglC, and IglD as well as PdpA and PdpB were necessary for efficient growth in insect cells, but PdpC and PdpD were not required. The SualB cell line presents a valuable model to study the interactions between this important pathogen and insect vectors.
PubMed ID
19058636 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Western of Journal of Medicine. 1993 Jun;158(6):619-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
Liles WC
Burger RJ
Source
Western of Journal of Medicine. 1993 Jun;158(6):619-22
Date
1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Epidemiology
Animals
Cat Diseases
Transmission
Cats
Humans
Male
Tularemia
Veterinary
Zoonoses
PubMed ID
8337864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tularemia; first case to be reported in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294044
Source
Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. : 1896). 1946 Jun 14;61:875.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1946
Author
Williams RB
Source
Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. : 1896). 1946 Jun 14;61:875.
Date
1946
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biometry
Tularemia
Epidemiology
Statistics & numerical data
Less detail
Source
Alaska's Health. December 1945; 3(12):p.[2-3]
Publication Type
Article
Date
1945
Author
Williams RB
Source
Alaska's Health. December 1945; 3(12):p.[2-3]
Date
1945
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Tularemia
Less detail

A tuberculosis control program in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294042
Source
Alaska Health. Special Edition. April 1945. 3(4).
Publication Type
Article
Date
1945
Author
Haas, R
Author Affiliation
S.A. Surgeon (R), U.S. Public Health Service
Source
Alaska Health. Special Edition. April 1945. 3(4).
Date
1945
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Tuberculosis
Medical care
Health education
Less detail
Source
Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health : Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1996
Author
Nikitin YuP
Tatarinova OV
Source
Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health : Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996.
Date
1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Aged
Far East
Humans
Longevity
Russia
Siberia
Less detail

Iron deficient states and blood lipids in Native Chukotka women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294037
Source
Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health : Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1996
  1 document  

Blood leukogram in Native Chukotka population, social and ecological risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294036
Source
Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health : Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1996
  1 document  
Author
Gyrgolkay LA
Astakhova T
Zhuravskaya E
Lebedev G
Source
Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health : Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996.
Date
1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
215945
Keywords
Chukotka
Blood
Leukogram
Leukoctes
Documents
Less detail
Source
Health Reports. 1989;1(1):69-79.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
Gaudette L
Source
Health Reports. 1989;1(1):69-79.
Date
1989
Language
English
French
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Risk factors
Tuberculosis
Ethnology
Abstract
In 1987, 1,957 new or reactivated cases of tuberculosis were reported in Canada, an 8.8% drop from 1986. This corresponds to an overall decline of almost 50% in Canada's tuberculosis rates over the past decade. This article examines tuberculosis rates by sex, age and province, and identifies four high risk groups. The first group, comprising North American Indians and Inuit, has a rate five to ten times higher than the Canadian population. Poor inner city residents have rates up to four times higher, and foreign-born Canadians up to three times higher. For all Canadians, risk increases with age, and thus the elderly comprise the fourth risk group. A fifth group, males aged 25 to 44 infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and who later develop Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), has emerged in the United States although no increased risk is at yet seen in Canada.
PubMed ID
2491353 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis: finding a community solution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294034
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:242-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
McGillivray J
Webb M
Jong M
Jong C
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:242-6.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arctic Regions
Epidemiology
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable disease control
Organization & administration
Community Health Planning
Methods
Community Health Services
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Newfoundland and Labrador
Population Surveillance
Program Evaluation
Tuberculosis
Prevention & control
Abstract
The Tuberculosis Surveillance Project set out to gain community and health care worker support for and participation in the development and implementation of a tuberculosis control program which would address the high incidence of tuberculosis in Innu and Inuit communities in Labrador. The underlying principle of this project is that a tuberculosis control program must have the support of both the communities and the health care workers if it is to succeed. A three-person tuberculosis steering committee, with representation from the Innu Nation, the Labrador Inuit Association, and the Labrador Health Services Board, supervised initial tuberculosis data collection and analysis and workshop planning. Community Health Representatives, community physicians, and community nurses participated in a workshop to develop a tuberculosis protocol for the region. In addition, community tuberculosis control strategies were developed in workshops in each community in an effort to ensure community and health care worker support for the protocol and tuberculosis control in its broadest sense. This project illustrates how partnerships between communities and health care workers can be achieved. Future tuberculosis incidence rates will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the partnership.
PubMed ID
10093282 View in PubMed
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26157 records – page 1 of 1308.